Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents

2014.07.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dominic Gregory, Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents, Oxford University
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2014.07.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dominic Gregory, Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents, Oxford University Press, 2013, 230pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199653737. Reviewed by Angela Mendelovici, University of Western Ontario In this book, Dominic Gregory's aim is to provide a theory of the contents of distinctively sensory representations. The introduction and Chapters 1-4 provide the basic theory, while Chapters 5-8 discuss applications. This review focuses on the theory. Gregory's target is distinctively sensory representations (DSRs), which are representations that, as he puts it, show things as looking, sounding, or, more generally, "sensorily standing" a certain way. What it is to sensorily stand a certain way is best introduced with the help of examples. A visual mental image of a table shows the table as looking brown and shiny, but it does not, all on its own, show the complete. . .

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