Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States

2014.06.37 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rebecca Gordon, Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States, Oxford University Press, 2014, 214pp.,
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2014.06.37 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rebecca Gordon, Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States, Oxford University Press, 2014, 214pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780199336432. Reviewed by Stephen Kershnar, State University of New York at Fredonia In this book, Rebecca Gordon argues against the use of torture. What is distinctive about it is that she argues that the traditional ethical approaches to evaluating torture (consequentialism and deontology) fail because they evaluate torture as a set of isolated actions rather than as a historically and socially embedded practice. To evaluate such a practice she uses a virtue-ethics approach, focusing on the work of Alasdair MacIntyre to show that the U.S.'s use of torture was and is problematic.[1] Because torture's effect warps the four cardinal virtues (courage, prudence, temperance, and justice), it is problematic and should be prohibited. Gordon's argument is interesting. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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