Implicature

[Revised entry by Wayne Davis on June 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] "Implicature" denotes either (i) the act of meaning or implying one thing by saying something else,
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[Revised entry by Wayne Davis on June 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] "Implicature" denotes either (i) the act of meaning or implying one thing by saying something else, or (ii) the object of that act. Implicatures can be part of sentence meaning or dependent on conversational context, and can be conventional (in different senses) or unconventional. Figures of speech such as metaphor, irony, and understatement provide familiar examples. Implicature serves a variety of goals beyond communication: maintaining good social relations, misleading without lying, style, and verbal efficiency....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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