Distant Strangers: Ethics, Psychology, and Global Poverty

2014.06.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Judith Lichtenberg, Distant Strangers: Ethics, Psychology, and Global Poverty, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 276pp., $29.99
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2014.06.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Judith Lichtenberg, Distant Strangers: Ethics, Psychology, and Global Poverty, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 276pp., $29.99 (pbk), ISBN 9780521124621. Reviewed by Tina Rulli, University of California, Davis How much can morality demand of the world's affluent and comfortable people to help the billion-plus people who live in absolute poverty? Judith Lichtenberg advances a well-worn discussion by infusing it with insights from social psychology. On one side of the contemporary debate, ignited by Peter Singer, are those who argue that the affluent and comfortable have demanding duties to alleviate the suffering of the global poor;[1] on the other side is a program of scholarship advocating limits to the demands morality can make on individuals to help the poor.[2] Ultimately, Lichtenberg falls into the latter camp. But she aims to shift the terms of the debate. Lichtenberg begins with two "working. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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