Do older people have different epistemic intuitions than younger people? A study on fake-barn intuitions

Wesley Buckwalter, Stephen Stich, Edouard Machery and I recently had a paper published in Episteme, titled 'Epistemic Intuitions in Fake-Barn Thought Experiments'. Here is the abstract: In
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Wesley Buckwalter, Stephen Stich, Edouard Machery and I recently had a paper published in Episteme, titled 'Epistemic Intuitions in Fake-Barn Thought Experiments'. Here is the abstract:In epistemology, fake-barn thought experiments are often taken to be intuitively clear cases in which a justified true belief does not qualify as knowledge. We report a study designed to determine whether members of the general public share this intuition. The data suggest that while participants are less inclined to attribute knowledge in fake-barn cases than in unproblematic cases of knowledge, they nonetheless do attribute knowledge to protagonists in fake-barn cases. Moreover, the intuition that fake-barn cases do count as knowledge is negatively correlated with age; older participants are less likely than younger participants to attribute knowledge in fake-barn cases. We also found that increasing the number of defeaters (fakes) does not decrease the inclination to attribute knowledge.While we. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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