A Priori Justification and Knowledge

[Revised entry by Bruce Russell on May 19, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A priori justification is a type of epistemic justification that is, in some sense, independent of experience.
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[Revised entry by Bruce Russell on May 19, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A priori justification is a type of epistemic justification that is, in some sense, independent of experience. Gettier examples have led most philosophers to think that having a justified true belief is not sufficient for knowledge (see sec. 5, below, and the example, Sheep), but many still believe that it is necessary. For those that do, a priori knowledge is knowledge based on a priori justification. There are a variety of views...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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