Question about Logic - Richard Heck responds

In paradoxes such as the Epimenides 'liar' example, is it not sufficient to say that all such sentences are inherently contradictory and therefore without meaning? Like Chomsky's 'the green river
Philosophy News image
In paradoxes such as the Epimenides 'liar' example, is it not sufficient to say that all such sentences are inherently contradictory and therefore without meaning? Like Chomsky's 'the green river sleeps furiously', it's a sentence, to be sure, but that's all it is. Thanks in advance :) Response from: Richard Heck Chomsky himself, if I remember correctly, once pointed out that "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" could mean something like: Uninteresting environmentalist proposals are not now being paid attention to, but they are starting to gain adherents. (The last bit isn't right, but it gets the gist.)I'll add that the strengthened liar (due to Charles Parsons, in this form) is usually taken to be: (S) Either (S) is meaningless, or else (S) is false. If you think that (S) is meaningless, then you are presumably prepared to assert:(S') (S) is meaningless.But then it is a simple step of disjunction introduction to (S) itself. Can disjunction introduction really take us from a. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

blog comments powered by Disqus