Addiction and Self-Control: Perspectives from Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience

2014.04.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Neil Levy (ed.), Addiction and Self-Control: Perspectives from Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience, Oxford University
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2014.04.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Neil Levy (ed.), Addiction and Self-Control: Perspectives from Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience, Oxford University Press, 2013, 278pp., $59.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780199862580. Reviewed by Olav Gjelsvik, CSMN, University of Oslo My grandfather died young in 1938. He was a keen smoker, teetotaller, sportsman, family man, and a pillar of society. He was definitely self-controlled in the eyes of his contemporaries -- a tremendously hard worker and, we know now, a happy addict who died from tobacco use. He had no knowledge of nicotine addiction or its ramifications. Examples like this should be kept in mind when thinking about addiction, self-control and the relationship between the two. In his fine introduction to this new and excellent collection, Neil Levy starts by saying: "One of the defining features of addiction is an impairment of self-control: addicts are people who (to all appearance) find. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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