Justice and Bad Luck

[Revised entry by Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen on April 11, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement1.html, supplement2.html] Some people end up worse off than others partly because of
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[Revised entry by Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen on April 11, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement1.html, supplement2.html] Some people end up worse off than others partly because of their bad luck. For instance, some die young due to a genetic disease, whereas others live long lives. Are such differential luck induced inequalities unjust? Many are inclined to answer this question affirmatively. To understand this inclination, we need a clear account of what luck involves. On some accounts, luck nullifies responsibility. On others, it nullifies desert. It is often said that justice requires luck to be 'neutralized'. However, it is...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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