Austen was fond of fabrication

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Macrocognition: A Theory of Distributed Minds and Collective Intentionality

2014.04.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Bryce Huebner, Macrocognition: A Theory of Distributed Minds and Collective Intentionality, Oxford University Press, 2014,
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2014.04.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Bryce Huebner, Macrocognition: A Theory of Distributed Minds and Collective Intentionality, Oxford University Press, 2014, 278pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199926275. Reviewed by Deborah Perron Tollefsen, University of Memphis The idea that groups have minds was popular in the late-19th and early-20th centuries. The group mind was posited as a force that influenced and dominated individual agency and provided an explanation for various types of human behavior. But such explanations were deemed mysterious, and, with the rise of behaviorism and operationalism, the idea fell out of favor. But interest in group mentality has experienced a rebirth over the past few decades. Within philosophy, Margaret Gilbert's work (e.g., 1989, 2004, 2013) has done a great deal to bring attention to the ways in which individuals might form a single unit of intentional agency, and Christian List and Philip. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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