Question about Logic - Stephen Maitzen responds

What is the metaphysical nature of logic itself? When we refer to a basic principle of logic (such as non-contradiction) are we referring to something that exists which we call “non-contradiction”?
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What is the metaphysical nature of logic itself? When we refer to a basic principle of logic (such as non-contradiction) are we referring to something that exists which we call “non-contradiction”? Or is it simply an abstraction that doesn’t exist naturally or non-naturally? Response from: Stephen Maitzen I would caution against inferring from 'The principle of noncontradiction is an abstraction' to 'The principle of noncontradiction doesn't exist naturally or non-naturally'. A number of philosophers, and maybe an even larger number of mathematicians, think that at least some abstract objects must exist -- and exist non-naturally. It may be that the principle of noncontradiction is among those abstract objects. You may find this SEP entry on the topic helpful.

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