Tense and Aspect

[New Entry by Friedrich Hamm and Oliver Bott on January 7, 2014.] Time flies like an arrow.... Fruit flies like a banana. (Oettinger 1966) Many languages have grammatical means to indicate the time when an action or event occurs, or when a state or process holds. This phenomenon is called tense. In
[New Entry by Friedrich Hamm and Oliver Bott on January 7, 2014.] Time flies like an arrow.... Fruit flies like a banana. (Oettinger 1966) Many languages have grammatical means to indicate the time when an action or event occurs, or when a state or process holds. This phenomenon is called tense. In English, for example, adding the morpheme -ed to the verb walk, to form walked, indicates that the event denoted by the verb occurred before the present time. What is called aspect, on the other hand, deals with the internal constituency of actions, events, states, processes or situations. For instance, it may indicate that an action is completed or still ongoing. English typically uses the -ing form of verbs to indicate ongoing processes, as in He is building a house....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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