Austen was fond of fabrication

" href="/post/2017/01/19/lt;pgt;Whats-the-relationship-between-fact-and-fiction-in-Jane-Austens-novels-Janeites-take-pride-in-discovering-ldquo;truths-but-lt;stronggt;Austen-was-fond-of-fabricationlt;stronggt;lt;pgt;.aspx" />

Question about Probability - Allen Stairs responds

In a chapter on regression to the mean (Thinking Fast and Slow) Daniel Kahneman resorts to "luck" as an explanation for why one professional golfer shoots a lower score in a round than his/her rivals given that the talent pool is reasonably even. While a "lucky" (or unlucky) bounce can impact one's

Philosophy News image In a chapter on regression to the mean (Thinking Fast and Slow) Daniel Kahneman resorts to "luck" as an explanation for why one professional golfer shoots a lower score in a round than his/her rivals given that the talent pool is reasonably even. While a "lucky" (or unlucky) bounce can impact one's score, I find luck as a concept a poor explanation for performance. What is the philosophical status of luck, and are there different flavors of luck depending upon the philosophy? Is luck to chance as evidence is to data?

Response from: Allen Stairs  . . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

blog comments powered by Disqus