Newcomb's Paradox

"There are two boxes in front of you. One, a transparent box, has $10,000 in it that you can see, and the other, an opaque box, has either $0 or $1,000,000 in it. You can choose to take both boxes or you can choose to take only the opaque box..."

"There are two boxes in front of you.  One, a transparent box, has $10,000 in it that you can see, and the other, an opaque box, has either $0 or $1,000,000 in it.  You can choose to take both boxes or you can choose to take only the opaque box.  However, a very successful Predictor has made a prediction as to whether you will take the opaque box only (one-box) or both boxes (two-box).  In accordance with its prediction, it has placed $0 in the opaque box if it has predicted that you will two-box, or it has placed $1,000,000 in the opaque box if it has predicted that you will one-box.  You know all of this information.  Do you one-box or two-box, that is, do you take the opaque box only, or do you take both boxes?" 

When faced with the situation presented in Newcomb's paradox, do you choose one box or two boxes (Note: If you have studied this paradox before, what was your unstudied and first answer to this paradox)?


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