Borsa di studio/Scholarship

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  Istituto Italiano per gli Studi
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Storici
Town: 
Napoli
Country: 
Italy . . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Short-term postdoc appointments (2 months, full-time) in ethics, with a focus on technology

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  University of Twente
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
University of Twente
Town: 
Enschede
Country: 
Netherlands
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

How well do you know Thomas Hobbes? [quiz]

This May, the OUP Philosophy team honors Thomas Hobbes (April 5, 1588 – December 4, 1679) as their Philosopher of the Month. Hobbes is remembered as the author of one of the greatest of books on
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This May, the OUP Philosophy team honors Thomas Hobbes (April 5, 1588 – December 4, 1679) as their Philosopher of the Month. Hobbes is remembered as the author of one of the greatest of books on political philosophy ever written, Leviathan, in which he argued with a precision reached by few other thinkers. But how much do you know about this famous political philosopher? Test your knowledge of Hobbes with the quiz below. Quiz image credit: portrait of Thomas Hobbes by John Michael Wright. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.  Featured image credit: The Destruction of Leviathan by Gustave Doré. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.  The post How well do you know Thomas Hobbes? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesPhilosopher of the month: Thomas HobbesHow well do you know Immanuel Kant? [quiz]How well do you know David Hume? [quiz] 

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Caring about human rights: the case of ISIS and Yazidi women

Mass sexual violence against women and girls is a constant in human history. One of these atrocities erupted in August 2014 in ISIS-occupied territory and persists to this day. Mainly targeting
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Mass sexual violence against women and girls is a constant in human history. One of these atrocities erupted in August 2014 in ISIS-occupied territory and persists to this day. Mainly targeting women and girls from the Yazidi religious minority, ISIS officially reinstituted sexual slavery. Publicly promulgated, purportedly Sharia sanctioned rules govern buying, selling, gifting, and emancipating abducted women and girls. Accessing the perspectives of the victims is necessary to understand this flagrant human rights abuse and to secure commitment to restoring their rights. The victims’ stories that the media and NGOs transmit provide ample information about where ISIS imprisoned Yazidi women and girls, how ISIS transported them, and how ISIS allocated them to men. Documenting these logistics could prove invaluable if it becomes possible to prosecute ISIS leaders and other perpetrators for war crimes and crimes against humanity. The victims also testify to the workings of ISIS’s sexual. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

<strong>Reading Edward Said</strong> in a warming world. The critic had no time for tree-huggers, who he felt lacked a proper cause. But tree-huggers should make time for Said

Reading Edward Said in a warming world. The critic had no time for tree-huggers, who he felt lacked a proper cause. But tree-huggers should make time for
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Reading Edward Said in a warming world. The critic had no time for tree-huggers, who he felt lacked a proper cause. But tree-huggers should make time for Said

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Have you ever wanted to be a badger? A goat? The long, weird history of artists and intellectuals <strong>trying to become animals</strong> involves Tolstoy, Joyce, Heidegger

Have you ever wanted to be a badger? A goat? The long, weird history of artists and intellectuals trying to become animals involves Tolstoy, Joyce,
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Have you ever wanted to be a badger? A goat? The long, weird history of artists and intellectuals trying to become animals involves Tolstoy, Joyce, Heidegger

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

"We don&rsquo;t learn much of anything from the past," says <strong>David Rieff</strong>. The crimes of then provide no prophylactic against those of now

&quot;We don&amp;rsquo;t learn much of anything from the past,&quot; says David Rieff. The crimes of then provide no prophylactic against those of
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"We don’t learn much of anything from the past," says David Rieff. The crimes of then provide no prophylactic against those of now

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Manifest Reality: Kant's Idealism and His Realism

2016.05.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Lucy Allais, Manifest Reality: Kant&#39;s Idealism and His Realism, Oxford University Press, 2015, 329pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.05.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Lucy Allais, Manifest Reality: Kant's Idealism and His Realism, Oxford University Press, 2015, 329pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198747130. Reviewed by Kris McDaniel, Syracuse University This book is terrific. In it one finds a plausible account of transcendental idealism, supported by arguments that are refreshingly clear yet powerful. It provides an excellent overview of a wide range of competing interpretations, each of which is sympathetically presented but also subjected to serious objections. It would be near impossible to survey all the ways in which Kant's transcendental idealism has been interpreted, but this book provides an excellent overview of many of them, and hence is welcome resource for both beginners and experts. Although some of these interpretations, e.g., Kant as a phenomenalist, are decisively refuted, Allais is rhetorically temperate throughout. Finally, it is a pleasure to read, and how. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Catharine Macaulay

[Revised entry by Karen Green on May 25, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Catharine Macaulay&#39;s most substantial work was the eight-volume A History of England from the Accession of James
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[Revised entry by Karen Green on May 25, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Catharine Macaulay's most substantial work was the eight-volume A History of England from the Accession of James I. to that of the Brunswick Line, the first volume of which was published in 1763, but the last not until twenty years later. This history, which began with the accession of James 1, and told the history of the English Civil War as the outcome of the struggle of the Commons to retain their liberties against the absolutist tendencies of the Stuarts, affirmed the right of the people to depose their monarch. She wrote a...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Incredible Shifting Hillary

Embed from Getty Images When supporters of Donald Trump are asked why they back him, the most common answers are that Trump “tells it like it is” and that he is “authentic.” When people who dislike
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Embed from Getty Images When supporters of Donald Trump are asked why they back him, the most common answers are that Trump “tells it like it is” and that he is “authentic.” When people who dislike Hillary are asked why, they often refer to her ever shifting positions and that she just says what she thinks people want to hear. Given that Trump has, at best, a distant relation with the truth it is somewhat odd that he is seen as telling it like it is. He may be authentic, but he is most assuredly telling it like it is not. While Hillary has shifted positions, she has a far closer relationship to the truth (although still not a committed one). Those who oppose Hillary tend to focus on these shifts in making the case against her. Her defenders endeavor to minimize the impact of these claims or boldly try to make a virtue of said shifting. Given the importance of the shifting, this a matter well worth considering. While the extent of Hillary’s shifting can be debated, the fact that she. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy