Advances in Experimental Moral Psychology

2014.10.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Hagop Sarkissian and Jennifer Cole Wright (eds.), Advances in Experimental Moral Psychology, Bloomsbury, 2014, 256pp., $112.00
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2014.10.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Hagop Sarkissian and Jennifer Cole Wright (eds.), Advances in Experimental Moral Psychology, Bloomsbury, 2014, 256pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781472509383. Reviewed by Jesse S. Summers, Duke University The distinction between moral psychology and moral philosophy has never been a clear one. Observations about what humans are like plays an indispensable role in understanding our moral obligations and virtues, and great swaths of moral philosophy until the 19th century are psychology avant la lettre, empirical speculations about how we form moral judgments, about mental faculties and rationality, pleasure, pain, and character. This relationship between philosophy and psychology becomes both opaque and strained once experimental psychology develops its own academic discipline. Nevertheless, many contemporary moral debates -- like those surrounding moral character and moral motivation -- are clearly aware of and. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Law and Ideology

[Revised entry by Christine Sypnowich on October 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] If law is a system of enforceable rules governing social relations and legislated by a political
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[Revised entry by Christine Sypnowich on October 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] If law is a system of enforceable rules governing social relations and legislated by a political system, it might seem obvious that law is connected to ideology. Ideology refers, in a general sense, to a system of political ideas, and law and politics seem inextricably intertwined....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Deaths of Ambrose Bierce

In 1913, Ambrose Bierce rode a horse into Mexico and disappeared. There were clues – too many to follow. Indeed, Bierce died over and over again…
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In 1913, Ambrose Bierce rode a horse into Mexico and disappeared. There were clues – too many to follow. Indeed, Bierce died over and over again… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

King of Colors

Mondrian called green a “useless color.” Kandinsky compared it to “a fat cow.” Nonetheless, we live in green’s triumphant age…
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Mondrian called green a “useless color.” Kandinsky compared it to “a fat cow.” Nonetheless, we live in green’s triumphant age… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

End of genius

The end of genius. The label, which once conveyed the supposed superiority of white European males, has outlived its usefulness…
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The end of genius. The label, which once conveyed the supposed superiority of white European males, has outlived its usefulness… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Question about Beauty, Biology - Allen Stairs responds

Are 'dangerous' and 'aesthetically ugly' one and the same thing? I read somewhere once, that arachnophobia evolved as a defence mechanism against dangerous spiders. Even though most spider species
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Are 'dangerous' and 'aesthetically ugly' one and the same thing? I read somewhere once, that arachnophobia evolved as a defence mechanism against dangerous spiders. Even though most spider species are harmless, this evolved response is still there, as it is better to avoid all spiders, even the harmless ones to avoid being bitten by the really deadly ones. Seeing as this aesthetic disgust and fear arose for the purpose of keeping one safe, and very few spiders are actually dangerous, would it be incorrect to view the harmless ones as ugly? Similarly, there are some dangerous animals I consider quite beautiful: tigers, for example. Would it be incorrect to view them as beautiful because they are dangerous? Basically, what I'm trying to ask is, because perception of ugliness evolved to keep us from danger, is danger synonymous with ugliness and is any visual beauty we ascribe to a dangerous animal simply an illusion? Conversely, are non-dangerous animals that we find ugly actually. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Charlie Dunbar Broad

[Revised entry by Kent Gustavsson on October 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text,
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[Revised entry by Kent Gustavsson on October 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] ...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

IAI Debate: Secrets of the Mind

Many philosophers hold that the essence of consciousness is the first person experience of being a conscious being, a phenomenon irreducible to any third-person analysis. Others demur. On which side do you fall?

LOGO_iai-black_40x373222Can science explain consciousness? That's the topic of a debate hosted by The Institute of Arts and Ideas. The debate is not new of course but of all topics in philosophy, this one is one of the more susceptible to being better informed by advances in the hard sciences. Many philosophers hold that the essence of consciousness is the first person experience of being a conscious being, a phenomenon irreducible to any third-person analysis. Others demur. On which side do you fall? IAI describes their debate this way: We have no explanation of consciousness. Yet from the origins of life to the workings of the atom, science has provided answers when none were thought possible.  Might we be about to crack consciousness as well?  An impossible fantasy or an exciting adventure for mankind?

The Panel: Joanna Kavenna asks eminent physicist Roger Penrose, Master and His Emissary author Iain McGilchrist, and evolutionary psychologist Nicholas Humphrey to explain the all-seeing 'I'.

Check out the video below and visit their website to join the conversation!

The truth about evil

Politicians talk about evil as if it could be eradicated. But the only effective strategy begins with accepting that evil will never go away…
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Politicians talk about evil as if it could be eradicated. But the only effective strategy begins with accepting that evil will never go away… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Shakespeare and Montaigne

Working in different languages at nearly the same time, Shakespeare and Montaigne invented the stylistic means for reflecting on the human condition…
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Working in different languages at nearly the same time, Shakespeare and Montaigne invented the stylistic means for reflecting on the human condition… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily