Assistant Director

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  APRA Foundation Berlin
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
APRA Foundation Berlin
Town: 
Berlin
Country: 
Germany
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Africana Philosophy

[Revised entry by Lucius T. Outlaw Jr. on May 23, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] "Africana philosophy" is the name for an emergent and still developing field of ideas and idea-spaces,
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[Revised entry by Lucius T. Outlaw Jr. on May 23, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] "Africana philosophy" is the name for an emergent and still developing field of ideas and idea-spaces, intellectual endeavors, discourses, and discursive networks within and beyond academic philosophy that was recognized as such by national and international organizations of professional philosophers, including the American Philosophical Association, starting in the 1980s. Thus, the name does not refer to a particular philosophy, philosophical system,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

For modern interpreters, <strong>Greek tragedy</strong> boils down to lessons of power &mdash; how to get and keep it. And sexual politics, of course

For modern interpreters, Greek tragedy boils down to lessons of power &amp;mdash; how to get and keep it. And sexual politics, of
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For modern interpreters, Greek tragedy boils down to lessons of power — how to get and keep it. And sexual politics, of course

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Diana Trilling</strong> was key to her husband's literary success. But did it come at the expense of her own? &ldquo;People will celebrate one member of a household but not two&rdquo;

Diana Trilling was key to her husband&#39;s literary success. But did it come at the expense of her own? &amp;ldquo;People will celebrate one member of a household but not
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Diana Trilling was key to her husband's literary success. But did it come at the expense of her own? “People will celebrate one member of a household but not two”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Is <strong>intersectionality</strong> solving social ills? Or does it make us stupid? The academic theory, once obscure, is now everywhere

Is intersectionality solving social ills? Or does it make us stupid? The academic theory, once obscure, is now
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Is intersectionality solving social ills? Or does it make us stupid? The academic theory, once obscure, is now everywhere

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Responding to Global Poverty: Harm, Responsibility, and Agency

2017.05.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christian Barry and Gerhard &#216;verland, Responding to Global Poverty: Harm, Responsibility, and Agency, Cambridge University Press,
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2017.05.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christian Barry and Gerhard Øverland, Responding to Global Poverty: Harm, Responsibility, and Agency, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 263pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107031470. Reviewed by George Pavlakos, University of Glasgow Facts of (global) poverty ground responsibility whereby people owe to one another obligations of justice. Recent controversies about the nature of our relation with those who live beyond the borders of our countries have disabled this compelling and, in many ways, robust explanation, leaving many a philosopher struggling to establish a much lower baseline for the explanation of responsibility for global poverty. If there are no (normative) facts of justice, which can explain how facts of poverty ground responsibility, some other route needs to be taken. A standard move is to divest the interaction between the poor and the affluent of any substantive normative meaning and try to work. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The illegitimate open-mindedness of arithmetic

We are often told that we should be open-minded. In other words, we should be open to the idea that even our most cherished, most certain, most secure, most well-justified beliefs might be wrong.
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We are often told that we should be open-minded. In other words, we should be open to the idea that even our most cherished, most certain, most secure, most well-justified beliefs might be wrong. But this is, in one sense, puzzling. After all, aren’t those beliefs that we hold most dearly–those that we feel are best supported–exactly the one’s we should not feel are open to doubt? If we found ourselves able to doubt those beliefs – that is, if we are able to be open-minded about them–then they aren’t all that cherished, certain, secure, or well-justified after all! This has led some philosophers to treat open-mindedness, not as an attitude that applies to particular beliefs, but rather as a second-order attitude that applies to our body of beliefs as a whole. I can’t do full justice to this sort of approach here, but the following should give one an idea of what is going on. To make things concrete, let’s let Φ(x) be a predicate that applies to numbers, and let’s say. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Lorenzo Valla

[Revised entry by Lodi Nauta on May 22, 2017. Changes to: Bibliography] Lorenzo Valla (c. 1406 - 1457) was one of the most important humanists of his time. In his Elegantiae linguae Latinae, an
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[Revised entry by Lodi Nauta on May 22, 2017. Changes to: Bibliography] Lorenzo Valla (c. 1406 - 1457) was one of the most important humanists of his time. In his Elegantiae linguae Latinae, an advanced handbook of Latin language and style, he gave the humanist program some of its most trenchant and combative formulations, bringing the study of Latin to an unprecedented level. He made numerous contributions to classical scholarship. But he also used his vast knowledge of the classical languages and their literatures as a tool...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Imagination, idealism, an urge for self-transcendence: Why prominent intellectuals have been so willing to <strong>support terrible regimes</strong>&nbsp;

Imagination, idealism, an urge for self-transcendence: Why prominent intellectuals have been so willing to support terrible
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Imagination, idealism, an urge for self-transcendence: Why prominent intellectuals have been so willing to support terrible regimes 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In 2011, Daryl Bem, a social psychologist, published a paper in a top journal suggesting that <strong>ESP is real</strong>. That touched off a crisis of confidence in science. Should he be thanked or blamed?

In 2011, Daryl Bem, a social psychologist, published a paper in a top journal suggesting that ESP is real. That touched off a crisis of confidence in science. Should he be thanked or
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In 2011, Daryl Bem, a social psychologist, published a paper in a top journal suggesting that ESP is real. That touched off a crisis of confidence in science. Should he be thanked or blamed?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily