Why I Hope to Die at 75

Americans are a people obsessed with living longer, a misguided and destructive obsession, says Ezekiel Emanuel. He wants to die at 75…
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Americans are a people obsessed with living longer, a misguided and destructive obsession, says Ezekiel Emanuel. He wants to die at 75… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

History of the color green

How can one shade evoke sickness, hope, hazard, the supernatural? Colors are uncertain things, green not least among them…
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How can one shade evoke sickness, hope, hazard, the supernatural? Colors are uncertain things, green not least among them… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Cult of the talentless hipster

The music, the beards, the lack of talent: Are you fed up with hipster culture? Fine. But you have only yourself to blame for its ubiquity…
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The music, the beards, the lack of talent: Are you fed up with hipster culture? Fine. But you have only yourself to blame for its ubiquity… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Agamben and Politics: A Critical Introduction

2014.09.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sergei Prozorov, Agamben and Politics: A Critical Introduction, Edinburgh University Press, 2014, 200pp., $39.95 (pbk), ISBN
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2014.09.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sergei Prozorov, Agamben and Politics: A Critical Introduction, Edinburgh University Press, 2014, 200pp., $39.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780748676217. Reviewed by Adam Kotsko, Shimer College The field of secondary works on Agamben is becoming crowded, particularly works on his political thought. This year alone, Sergei Prozorov's Agamben and Politics joins Mathew Abbott's The Figure of This World: Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology (Edinburgh) and Jessica Whyte's Catastrophe and Redemption: The Political Thought of Giorgio Agamben. This multiplication should not be taken as simple repetition, however. In these and other recent studies, it could be said that the scholarship on Agamben's political thought is moving into a second phase, one that emphasizes the need to understand Agamben's project as a whole before grappling with his specifically political works. By contrast, the first phase of scholarship. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Question about Mind - Nicholas D. Smith responds

Is it even conceivable to think about absolutely nothing? Response from: Nicholas D. Smith Better than me trying to answer this, let me make a suggestion: if you want to read a very wry (and
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Is it even conceivable to think about absolutely nothing? Response from: Nicholas D. Smith Better than me trying to answer this, let me make a suggestion: if you want to read a very wry (and really thoughtful) essay about nothing, have a look at the old Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on "Nothing" written by P. T. Heath (Macmillan Publishing Co. & The Free Press, 1967), pp. 524-525 in vols. 5-6.

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Hermann Lotze

[Revised entry by David Sullivan on September 18, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Rudolph Hermann Lotze (1817 - 1881) mediated the transition from the exuberance of German idealism, in
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[Revised entry by David Sullivan on September 18, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Rudolph Hermann Lotze (1817 - 1881) mediated the transition from the exuberance of German idealism, in the first half of the nineteenth century, to the sober, scholarly and scientific ethos that came to prevail in the second half. He adapted the notion...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Question about Philosophers - Nicholas D. Smith responds

What does Plato mean (in The Republic) when he identifies that moderation (in the case of the city in speech) is identified with the agreement over who rules the city? Where is the moderation in
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What does Plato mean (in The Republic) when he identifies that moderation (in the case of the city in speech) is identified with the agreement over who rules the city? Where is the moderation in that? I really don't understand that word in the context of this metaphor. Response from: Nicholas D. Smith Plato has a number of things to say about moderation in the Republic, but I think the most important one is where he associates moderation with the proper functioning of the appetitive part of the soul. The good news about that part is that it is responsible for the basic functions that keep us alive, such as eating and drinking, and also make us inclined to reproduce. The bad news is that the appetites have a tendency to excess, which--if not prevented by the ruling part of the soul (the reasoning part)--will lead us to do things that are not all things considered really good for us. Hence, moderation in a person will be the result of the "agreement" on the part of the appetitive. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Should We Be Thinking About "Grand Ideas"?

Have you ever tried to bring up a philosophical "big idea" at a party and had those around you, glasses largely full, politely excuse themselves for another drink? People who think about grand theories are, many times, relegated to the same class as conspiracy theorists or astrologists: amusing but not those who should be taken seriously.

LOGO_iai-black_40x373Have you ever tried to bring up a philosophical "big idea" at a party and had those around you, glasses largely full, politely excuse themselves for another drink? People who think about grand theories are, many times, relegated to the same class as conspiracy theorists or astrologists: amusing but not those who should be taken seriously. Our friends at IAI put together a panel to discuss the relevance of big idea theorizing and the relevance such philosophizing has on the broader intellectual framework in which we operate. From their website: "Our culture and philosophy is sceptical of grand theories and big ideas, which we think best left to Parisian taxi drivers.  But aren't grand theories unavoidable? Would it not be better to explore and embrace big ideas rather than pretend they have been banished?  Or is this the route to dangerous nonsense?"

The Panel: Historian of ideas Hannah Dawson, philosopher and Closure theorist Hilary Dawson, and Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought Robert Eaglestone are thinking big.

Would it not be better to explore and embrace big ideas Check out the video below!

The "Double Jeopardy" Objection to QALYs

I've previously discussed Harris (1987)'s famous objection that the use of Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) in medical resource allocation is unjustly "discriminatory". Harris' second
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I've previously discussed Harris (1987)'s famous objection that the use of Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) in medical resource allocation is unjustly "discriminatory". Harris' second objection is that the use of QALYs gives rise to an unfair kind of “double jeopardy” (p.190):QALYs dictate that because an individual is unfortunate, because she has once become a victim of disaster, we are required to visit upon her a second and perhaps graver misfortune. The first disaster leaves her with a poor quality of life and QALYs then require that in virtue of this she be ruled out as a candidate for lifesaving treatment, or at best, that she be given little or no chance of benefiting from what little amelioration her condition admits of. Her first disaster leaves her with a poor quality of life and when she presents herself for help, along come QALYs and finish her off!Harris makes it sound as though the worse off people are, the less. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

PhD Fellowship in Philosophy of Art on Architectural Theory (KU Leuven)

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  KU Leuven
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
KU Leuven
Town: 
Leuven
Country: 
Belgium
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy