Unifying morality's effect on non-moral cognition

At this point, it is pretty clear is that people’s moral judgments affect a surprisingly large number of their judgments that do not seem to be straightforwardly moral (e.g., belief, causation,
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At this point, it is pretty clear is that people’s moral judgments affect a surprisingly large number of their judgments that do not seem to be straightforwardly moral (e.g., belief, causation, doing vs. allowing, freedom, happiness, innateness, intentional action, knowledge, love, and so on) The sheer number of different judgments affected by morality provides some reason against continuing to search for separate explanations for each effect. Rather, it looks as though we should be searching for ways in which the various effects of morality may be unified. Of course, the sort of explanation that could unify these various effects would have to be so abstract that it could be playing a role in each of these diverse kinds of judgments.In a new paper, we propose that the key to understanding how these effects can be unified is to begin thinking about the role of alternative possibilities. The basic idea is that our way of understanding many aspects of the world involves not only thinking. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

Full Professorship in Visual Culture

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  Alpen-Adria-Universität
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt
Town: 
Klagenfurt
Country: 
Austria . . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Beyond Art

2015.09.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dominic McIver Lopes, Beyond Art, Oxford University Press, 2014, 224pp., $30.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780198748083. Reviewed by David
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2015.09.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dominic McIver Lopes, Beyond Art, Oxford University Press, 2014, 224pp., $30.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780198748083. Reviewed by David Davies, McGill University In this richly argued and challenging book, Dominic McIver Lopes offers both a diagnosis of our current situation in the philosophy of art and a prescription for future progress. The diagnosis traces the historical path that has led us to our current preoccupation with developing a theory of art and to a consequent theoretical impasse. The prescription is that we 'change the subject' by asking different questions from the ones that have dominated philosophical reflection on art over the past two and a half centuries. By asking different questions within a different framework, Lopes maintains, we can better satisfy the interests that led us to philosophise about art in the first place. Lopes distinguishes three kinds of theories that might be offered in. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>Everybody's a critic</strong>. And everybody's in a rush to declare an opinion. But how one arrives there is often more interesting than the opinion itself

Everybody&#39;s a critic. And everybody&#39;s in a rush to declare an opinion. But how one arrives there is often more interesting than the opinion
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Everybody's a critic. And everybody's in a rush to declare an opinion. But how one arrives there is often more interesting than the opinion itself

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What does it mean to <strong>time-travel</strong>? In literature, history is a text, and we are its readers. Fredric Jameson unpacks the idea of science fiction

What does it mean to time-travel? In literature, history is a text, and we are its readers. Fredric Jameson unpacks the idea of science
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What does it mean to time-travel? In literature, history is a text, and we are its readers. Fredric Jameson unpacks the idea of science fiction

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The <strong>Library of America</strong> began publishing in 1982. But the idea was born in the mid-1950s, out of the friendship of Edmund Wilson and Jason Epstein

The Library of America began publishing in 1982. But the idea was born in the mid-1950s, out of the friendship of Edmund Wilson and Jason
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The Library of America began publishing in 1982. But the idea was born in the mid-1950s, out of the friendship of Edmund Wilson and Jason Epstein

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Kingdoms of God

2015.09.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kevin Hart,&#160;Kingdoms of God, Indiana University Press, 2014, 326pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780253014498. Reviewed by Felix &#211;
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2015.09.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kevin Hart, Kingdoms of God, Indiana University Press, 2014, 326pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780253014498. Reviewed by Felix Ó Murchadha, National University of Ireland, Galway Kevin Hart’s book is a rich collection of 13 essays (some but not all of which have been published previously in different forms) discussing the question of the Christian preaching of a salvation through God as Trinity. The essays are presented as a kind of promissory note to a book of systematic theology which Hart is in the process of writing (2). They range historically, conceptually and in disciplinary terms over a wide area, but there is a consistent thread throughout centering both methodologically and substantially around a ‘phenomenology of Christ’. The book has 5 parts. Beginning with St. Augustine, the essays involve careful readings also of Aquinas, Fichte, Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Bonhoeffer, Jankélévitsch, and Derrida,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Conservatives should embrace same-sex marriage

Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle In the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, decided on 26 June 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States has ruled by a 5-4 majority in favour of same-sex
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Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle In the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, decided on 26 June 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States has ruled by a 5-4 majority in favour of same-sex marriage. The majority judges have held that state governments must license same-sex marriages and recognize same-sex marriages lawfully licensed and performed elsewhere. The SCOTUS decision The “opinion of the Court” – i.e. the opinion commanding a majority of judges – was delivered by Justice Kennedy, joined by Justices Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan. Chief Justice Roberts dissented, along with Justices Scalia, Thomas, and Alito. Although I have not yet digested the entire 100 pages of the judges’ opinions, it is clear that the case turned on the court’s interpretation of the US Constitution’s Fourteenth Amendment, which, most relevantly, requires as follows: “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Descartes' Ontological Argument

[Revised entry by Lawrence Nolan on September 2, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Descartes&#39; ontological (or a priori) argument is both one of the most fascinating and poorly understood
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[Revised entry by Lawrence Nolan on September 2, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Descartes' ontological (or a priori) argument is both one of the most fascinating and poorly understood aspects of his philosophy. Fascination with the argument stems from the effort to prove God's existence from simple but powerful premises. Existence is derived immediately from the clear and distinct idea of a supremely perfect being. Ironically, the simplicity of the argument has also produced several misreadings, exacerbated in part by Descartes'...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Computability and Complexity

[Revised entry by Neil Immerman on September 2, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, descriptiveWorld2015.jpg] A mathematical problem is computable if it can be solved in principle by a
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[Revised entry by Neil Immerman on September 2, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, descriptiveWorld2015.jpg] A mathematical problem is computable if it can be solved in principle by a computing device. Some common synonyms for "computable" are "solvable", "decidable", and "recursive". Hilbert believed that all mathematical problems were solvable, but in the 1930's Godel, Turing, and Church showed that this is not the case. There is an extensive study and classification of which mathematical...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy