Feminist Perspectives on Class and Work

[Revised entry by Ann Ferguson, Rosemary Hennessy, and Mecke Nagel on September 28, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A good place to situate the start of theoretical debates about women,
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[Revised entry by Ann Ferguson, Rosemary Hennessy, and Mecke Nagel on September 28, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A good place to situate the start of theoretical debates about women, class and work is in the intersection with Marxism and feminism. Such debates were shaped not only by academic inquiries but as questions about the relation between women's oppression and liberation and the class politics of the left, trade union and feminist movements in the late 19th and 20th centuries, particularly in the U.S., Britain and Europe. It will also be necessary to consider various philosophical approaches to the concept of work, the way that...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Philosophy of Humor

[Revised entry by John Morreall on September 28, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Although most people value humor, philosophers have said little about it, and what they have said is
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[Revised entry by John Morreall on September 28, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Although most people value humor, philosophers have said little about it, and what they have said is largely critical. Three traditional theories of laughter and humor are examined, along with the theory that humor evolved from mock-aggressive play in apes. Understanding humor as play helps counter the traditional objections to it and reveals some of its benefits, including those it shares with philosophy itself....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The new creation part 3: Disability and the Eschaton, by Kevin Timpe

A few years ago, I had a student with Cerebral Palsy. He was one of those students that I connected with outside of the regular classroom. One day while we were talking about theological matters at
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A few years ago, I had a student with Cerebral Palsy. He was one of those students that I connected with outside of the regular classroom. One day while we were talking about theological matters at our favorite local coffee shop, he told me that he’d be “really pissed off” if he didn’t have CP [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Drugs, Race, Crime & Health

The war on drugs is perhaps the longest and least successful war waged by the United States. One of the main problems is, as Walt Kelley said, “we have met the enemy and he is us.” Which is to say
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The war on drugs is perhaps the longest and least successful war waged by the United States. One of the main problems is, as Walt Kelley said, “we have met the enemy and he is us.” Which is to say that the war on drugs is largely a civil war and most of the casualties are Americans. While some regard the war on drugs as a battle of virtue against vice, there is a compelling case that many of the drug laws were motivated by racism. For example, San Francisco’s 1875 law against opium was apparently based on the fear that Chinese men were luring white women into opium dens so as to have sex with them. This was followed by laws against cocaine (motivated largely by racism towards blacks) and then by laws against marijuana (motivated largely by biases against Mexicans). The war on drugs proper began in 1971 with Richard Nixon’s declaration and following presidents followed suit with varying degrees of enthusiasm. President Bill Clinton, eager to appear tough on crime, escalated the war in. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

The origin of the word SLANG is known!

Caution is a virtue, but, like every other virtue, it can be practiced with excessive zeal and become a vice (like parsimony turning into stinginess). The negative extreme of caution is
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Caution is a virtue, but, like every other virtue, it can be practiced with excessive zeal and become a vice (like parsimony turning into stinginess). The negative extreme of caution is cowardice. Although in dealing with historical linguistics, one should beware of jumping to conclusions, sometimes explorers succeed in revealing the truth, and then the time comes for accepting it. Slang, an overlay on standard language, has always existed, but the English word slang, as we know it, is recent: the earliest citations in the OED go back to the second half of the eighteenth century. That the very name of slang may emerge as a slang word need not surprise us (the origin of argot and cant provides a good parallel), and this makes its source even harder to discover, for slang tends to be born in places like Offal Court and disguise its shabby pedigree. Only a hundred years ago, slang was castigated as something unseemly and vulgar, but the war declared on it had as little chance of success. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

There's long been a vexed relationship between <strong>flesh and thought</strong>. We stubbornly cling to the hope of transcending the former to achieve a higher state of the latter&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;

There&#39;s long been a vexed relationship between flesh and thought. We stubbornly cling to the hope of transcending the former to achieve a higher state of the
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There's long been a vexed relationship between flesh and thought. We stubbornly cling to the hope of transcending the former to achieve a higher state of the latter   

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

When it came to <strong>explaining China</strong> to America, Pearl S. Buck and H.T. Tsiang seemed on two ends of a spectrum. But they shared a common fate: being ignored

When it came to explaining China to America, Pearl S. Buck and H.T. Tsiang seemed on two ends of a spectrum. But they shared a common fate: being
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When it came to explaining China to America, Pearl S. Buck and H.T. Tsiang seemed on two ends of a spectrum. But they shared a common fate: being ignored

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In postwar Paris, artists flocked to a squalid alley. There was a single shared toilet and cheap food, but the <strong>ideas were priceless</strong>

In postwar Paris, artists flocked to a squalid alley. There was a single shared toilet and cheap food, but the ideas were
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In postwar Paris, artists flocked to a squalid alley. There was a single shared toilet and cheap food, but the ideas were priceless

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Philosophy of Luck

2016.09.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Duncan Pritchard and Lee John Whittington (eds.), The Philosophy of Luck, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, 224pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN
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2016.09.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Duncan Pritchard and Lee John Whittington (eds.), The Philosophy of Luck, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, 224pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781119030577. Reviewed by Rik Peels, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam The notion of luck plays a crucial role in various areas in philosophy: there is, among other things, the concept of epistemic luck in different accounts of knowledge, the theory of moral luck in ethics, the notion of just desert in political philosophy, and all sorts of issues regarding the relation between luck and causation in metaphysics. As far as I know, this is the first edited volume to cover the notion of luck -- especially its nature -- in various subdisciplines in philosophy. One of the volume's key virtues is that it recognizes that the nature of luck -- exactly what luck is -- is crucial to many of these debates. It brings together and provides various new views on exactly what luck is... Read. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Not conservative, reactionary: The flawed case against same-sex marriage

Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle The time has come for Australia to provide for same-sex marriages. This would reflect the countries with which we compare ourselves, including the US and
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Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle The time has come for Australia to provide for same-sex marriages. This would reflect the countries with which we compare ourselves, including the US and the UK, and it would acknowledge the contemporary meaning of marriage in Western liberal democracies. As I write, however, progress has stalled. It remains to be seen whether Australia will have a plebiscite on same-sex marriage in early 2017. Federal parliament is considering the issue, and political parties are negotiating. Something that ought to be easy has become very difficult. A plebiscite is unnecessary, since the federal parliament has undoubted power to amend section 5 of the Marriage Act to change the definition of “marriage”. That is exactly what happened when the definition was last altered by parliament, as recently as 2004, to exclude the possibility of same-sex marriages. On that occasion, the Howard government’s action did not need a specific vote by the public. Michael. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy