What can my grandmother know about Mary

In What can she know Lorraine Code argues for a feminist epistemology, in which our situation, community, position in society, matter to what we can know. Knowledge mainly available to men is
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In What can she know Lorraine Code argues for a feminist epistemology, in which our situation, community, position in society, matter to what we can know. Knowledge mainly available to men is implicitly regarded as gender-neutral; meanwhile knowledge traditionally associated with women is regarded as not knowledge at all. Consider the practice of Latina women in [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Full Professor of Theoretical Philosophy

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  Utrecht University
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
Utrecht University
Town: 
Utrecht
Country: 
Netherlands
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Secret Life of Passwords

Our passwords, ourselves. More than an annoyance, they are suffused with pathos, mischief, sometimes even poetry. They are totems of our inner lives…
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Our passwords, ourselves. More than an annoyance, they are suffused with pathos, mischief, sometimes even poetry. They are totems of our inner lives… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Inimitable Clive James

The Clive James voice: intensely serious yet self-mocking, grave but never solemn, highbrow but never snobby. And always gorgeously inventive…
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The Clive James voice: intensely serious yet self-mocking, grave but never solemn, highbrow but never snobby. And always gorgeously inventive… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Neuroscience Is ruining the Humanities

We have shifted our focus from the meaning of ideas to the means by which they’re produced, says Arthur Krystal. Neuroscience is ruining the humanities…
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We have shifted our focus from the meaning of ideas to the means by which they’re produced, says Arthur Krystal. Neuroscience is ruining the humanities… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Nelson Goodman

[New Entry by Daniel Cohnitz and Marcus Rossberg on November 21, 2014.] Henry Nelson Goodman (1906 - 1998) was one of the most influential philosophers of the post-war era of American philosophy.
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[New Entry by Daniel Cohnitz and Marcus Rossberg on November 21, 2014.] Henry Nelson Goodman (1906 - 1998) was one of the most influential philosophers of the post-war era of American philosophy. Goodman's philosophical interests ranged from formal logic and the philosophy of science to the philosophy of art. In all these diverse fields Goodman made significant and highly original contributions. Perhaps his most famous contribution is the...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Ancient Political Philosophy

[Revised entry by Melissa Lane on November 21, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Ancient political philosophy is understood here to mean ancient Greek and Roman thought from the classical
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[Revised entry by Melissa Lane on November 21, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Ancient political philosophy is understood here to mean ancient Greek and Roman thought from the classical period of Greek thought in the fifth century BCE to the end of the Roman empire in the West in the fifth century CE, excluding the rise of Christian ideas about...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Bionic Ethics

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/51256116 Although bionics have been part of science fiction for quite some time (a well-known example is the Six Million Dollar Man), the reality of prosthetics has
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http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/51256116 Although bionics have been part of science fiction for quite some time (a well-known example is the Six Million Dollar Man), the reality of prosthetics has long been rather disappointing. But, thanks to America’s endless wars and recent advances in technology, bionic prosthetics are now a reality. There are now replacement legs that replicate the functionality of the original organics amazingly well. There have also been advances in prosthetic arms and hands as well as progress in artificial sight.  As with all technology, these bionic devices raise some important ethical issues. The easiest moral issue to address is that involving what could be called restorative bionics. These are devices that restore a degree of the original functionality possessed by the lost limb or organ. For example, a soldier who lost the lower part of her leg to an IED in Iraq might receive a bionic device that restores much of the functionality of the lost leg. As. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Question about Freedom, Law - Jonathan Westphal responds

If we have no free will, then is the entire legal system redundant since no one can be held accountable for anything since no one has control over their own actions? Response from: Jonathan
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If we have no free will, then is the entire legal system redundant since no one can be held accountable for anything since no one has control over their own actions? Response from: Jonathan Westphal Your question is a very important one and has been very important historically. It has driven quite a lot of discussion about freewill. Alas, I do not agree with Stephen's answer. If hard determinism is true, which is to say that we have no free will, then, Stephen says, the legal system would be corrupt. So also would be the moral systems, including the one that allows him to use the concept corrupt. Corruption is moral depravity, and if determinism is true and it undercuts law and morals, then there is no such thing as corruption. Those like me who are compatibilists take the view that the truth of determinism would have no consequences for law and morals. The classical compatibilist makes a distinction between those actions that are caused, and those that are coerced, though this. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Foundations of the Everyday: Shock, Deferral, Repetition

2014.11.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Eran Dorfman, Foundations of the Everyday: Shock, Deferral, Repetition, Rowman and Littlefield, 2014, 216pp., $37.95 (pbk), ISBN
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2014.11.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Eran Dorfman, Foundations of the Everyday: Shock, Deferral, Repetition, Rowman and Littlefield, 2014, 216pp., $37.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781783480500. Reviewed by Dylan Trigg, University of Memphis/University College Dublin Eran Dorfman seeks to critically revive the concept of the everyday as a central term in philosophical vocabulary. His reference to "foundation" in his titles reinforces this aim. For Dorfman, the term "foundation" marks the dynamic "background against which any significant activity occurs" (1-2). Such a conception of the everyday plays upon an ambiguity between the foundation as a site of stability and the foundation as a process of constant renewal and transformation. His book, drawing on both psychoanalysis and phenomenology, is an intriguing analysis of the multifaceted ways in which the everyday serves as a foundation of our bodily and cultural existence. At the heart of this work is a. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News