The Moral Status of Animals

[Revised entry by Lori Gruen on August 23, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Is there something distinctive about humanity that justifies the idea that humans have moral
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[Revised entry by Lori Gruen on August 23, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Is there something distinctive about humanity that justifies the idea that humans have moral status while non-humans do not? Providing an answer to this question has become increasingly important among philosophers as well as those outside of philosophy who are interested in our treatment of non-human animals. For some, answering this question will enable us to better understand the nature of human beings and the proper scope of our moral obligations. Some argue that there is an answer that can distinguish humans from the rest of the...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Sex is nice but fleeting. The joys of syntax, on the other hand, are everlasting. For a good time, diagram a sentence or dive into <strong>Coleridge&rsquo;s poetics</strong>

Sex is nice but fleeting. The joys of syntax, on the other hand, are everlasting. For a good time, diagram a sentence or dive into Coleridge&amp;rsquo;s
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Sex is nice but fleeting. The joys of syntax, on the other hand, are everlasting. For a good time, diagram a sentence or dive into Coleridge’s poetics

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

You can judge critics by the intensity of their feelings. Exhibit A: <strong>Michael Robbins</strong>, who swoons for Taylor Swift and tosses Molotovs at Charles Simic

You can judge critics by the intensity of their feelings. Exhibit A: Michael Robbins, who swoons for Taylor Swift and tosses Molotovs at Charles
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You can judge critics by the intensity of their feelings. Exhibit A: Michael Robbins, who swoons for Taylor Swift and tosses Molotovs at Charles Simic

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

America endures another <strong>racial reckoning</strong>. Will this one lead to social disintegration, political breakup, or collective nervous breakdown?

America endures another racial reckoning. Will this one lead to social disintegration, political breakup, or collective nervous
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America endures another racial reckoning. Will this one lead to social disintegration, political breakup, or collective nervous breakdown?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Descartes' Physics

[Revised entry by Edward Slowik on August 22, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] While Rene Descartes (1596 - 1650) is well-known as one of the founders of modern philosophy, his
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[Revised entry by Edward Slowik on August 22, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] While Rene Descartes (1596 - 1650) is well-known as one of the founders of modern philosophy, his influential role in the development of modern physics has been, until the later half of the twentieth century, generally under-appreciated and under-investigated by both historians and philosophers of science. Not only did Descartes provide the first distinctly modern formulation of laws of nature and a conservation principle of motion, but he also constructed what would...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Cellular Automata

[Revised entry by Francesco Berto and Jacopo Tagliabue on August 22, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Cellular automata (henceforth: CA) are discrete, abstract computational systems that
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[Revised entry by Francesco Berto and Jacopo Tagliabue on August 22, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Cellular automata (henceforth: CA) are discrete, abstract computational systems that have proved useful both as general models of complexity and as more specific representations of non-linear dynamics in a variety of scientific fields. Firstly, CA are (typically) spatially and temporally discrete: they are composed of a finite or denumerable set of homogenous, simple units, the atoms or cells. At each time unit, the cells instantiate one of a finite set of states. They evolve in parallel at...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Commentators on Aristotle

[Revised entry by Andrea Falcon on August 22, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement.html] One important mode of philosophical expression from the end of the Hellenistic period and
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[Revised entry by Andrea Falcon on August 22, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement.html] One important mode of philosophical expression from the end of the Hellenistic period and into Late Antiquity was the philosophical commentary. During this time Plato and Aristotle were regarded as philosophical authorities and their works were subject to intense study. This entry offers a concise account of how the revival of interest in the philosophy of Aristotle that took place toward the end of the Hellenistic period eventually developed into a new literary production: the philosophical commentary. It also follows the...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Fine-Tuning

[New Entry by Simon Friederich on August 22, 2017.] The term &quot;fine-tuning&quot; is used to characterize sensitive dependences of facts or properties on the values of certain parameters. Technological
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[New Entry by Simon Friederich on August 22, 2017.] The term "fine-tuning" is used to characterize sensitive dependences of facts or properties on the values of certain parameters. Technological devices are paradigmatic examples of fine-tuning. Whether they function as intended depends sensitively on parameters that describe the shape, arrangement, and material properties of their constituents, e.g., the constituents' conductivity, elasticity and thermal expansion coefficient. Technological devices are the products of actual...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Delmore Schwartz</strong> worried that he would be remembered as nasty, gauche, awkward &mdash; an overeager clown. The weight of his concerns, and his loneliness, hangs over his biographer

Delmore Schwartz worried that he would be remembered as nasty, gauche, awkward &amp;mdash; an overeager clown. The weight of his concerns, and his loneliness, hangs over his
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Delmore Schwartz worried that he would be remembered as nasty, gauche, awkward — an overeager clown. The weight of his concerns, and his loneliness, hangs over his biographer

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Her husband tried to commit suicide on their honeymoon, her brother disowned her, and at a ball, no one asked her to dance. <strong>George Eliot&rsquo;s humiliations</strong> enriched her writing

Her husband tried to commit suicide on their honeymoon, her brother disowned her, and at a ball, no one asked her to dance. George Eliot&amp;rsquo;s humiliations enriched her
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Her husband tried to commit suicide on their honeymoon, her brother disowned her, and at a ball, no one asked her to dance. George Eliot’s humiliations enriched her writing

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily