The Myth of the Moral Brain: The Limits of Moral Enhancement

2016.08.36 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Harris Wiseman, The Myth of the Moral Brain: The Limits of Moral Enhancement, MIT Press, 2016, 337pp., $38.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.08.36 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Harris Wiseman, The Myth of the Moral Brain: The Limits of Moral Enhancement, MIT Press, 2016, 337pp., $38.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262033923. Reviewed by Norbert Paulo, University of Salzburg There are various ways in which humans try, and have always tried, to become morally better. Traditional means of moral enhancement include civic education, the criminal justice system, self-awareness seminars, and ethics courses. Recent years have seen increased discussion of the potential of non-traditional biomedical means to enhance humans morally. For instance, it has been suggested that the hormone oxytocin makes people more social. In his far-ranging book, Harris Wiseman takes a cautious view and laments the fact that most proponents of such non-traditional moral enhancements fail to understand the complexity of morality when they ascribe an explanatory primacy to biological influences. In doing so they neglect. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<p>What stands between you and the act of writing? The insidious <strong>Imps of Inertia</strong>: Disenchanted Imp, Jaded Imp, Loneliness Imp, and Sloth Imp. Mark Edmundson explains</p>

What stands between you and the act of writing? The insidious Imps of Inertia: Disenchanted Imp, Jaded Imp, Loneliness Imp, and Sloth Imp. Mark Edmundson
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What stands between you and the act of writing? The insidious Imps of Inertia: Disenchanted Imp, Jaded Imp, Loneliness Imp, and Sloth Imp. Mark Edmundson explains

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<p><strong>Benjamin vs. Brecht</strong>. Their chess matches pitted the mercurial self-confidence of Brecht against the quiet focus of Benjamin. Brecht usually <br />won</p>

Benjamin vs. Brecht. Their chess matches pitted the mercurial self-confidence of Brecht against the quiet focus of Benjamin. Brecht usually
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Benjamin vs. Brecht. Their chess matches pitted the mercurial self-confidence of Brecht against the quiet focus of Benjamin. Brecht usually won

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<p><strong>Modernity</strong>&nbsp;is the feeling that we are profoundly different from the people who lived before us. It is a disorientation that began in the 16th <br />century and is still with us</p>

Modernity&amp;nbsp;is the feeling that we are profoundly different from the people who lived before us. It is a disorientation that began in the 16th century and is still with
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Modernity is the feeling that we are profoundly different from the people who lived before us. It is a disorientation that began in the 16th century and is still with us

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Reason, Value, and Respect: Kantian Themes from the Philosophy of Thomas E. Hill, Jr.

2016.08.35 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mark Timmons and Robert N. Johnson (eds.), Reason, Value, and Respect: Kantian Themes from the Philosophy of Thomas E. Hill, Jr.,
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2016.08.35 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mark Timmons and Robert N. Johnson (eds.), Reason, Value, and Respect: Kantian Themes from the Philosophy of Thomas E. Hill, Jr., Oxford University Press, 2015, 311pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199699575. Reviewed by David Sussman, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign This is a collection fourteen original papers inspired by the work of Thomas E. Hill, Jr., one of the foremost figures in contemporary Kantian ethics. It begins with a critical analysis by Hill's classic "Servility and Self-Respect," where he argues that servility is fundamentally a failure to properly understand or value one's own rights. In "Servility and Self-Respect: an African-American and Feminist Critique" Bernard and Jan Boxill contend that with his well-known examples of the Self-Deprecator, the Deferential Wife, and the Uncle Tom, Hill is really presenting us with cases that we naturally understand, despite Hill's stipulations,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Higher-Order Theories of Consciousness

[Revised entry by Peter Carruthers on August 29, 2016. Changes to: Bibliography] Higher-order theories of consciousness try to explain the distinctive properties of consciousness in terms of some
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[Revised entry by Peter Carruthers on August 29, 2016. Changes to: Bibliography] Higher-order theories of consciousness try to explain the distinctive properties of consciousness in terms of some relation obtaining between the conscious state in question and a higher-order representation of some sort (either a higher-order perception of that state, or a higher-order thought or belief about it). The most challenging properties to explain are those involved in phenomenal consciousness - the sort of state that has a subjective dimension, that has 'feel', or that it...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Ian McEwan</strong>&nbsp;woke from a daydream with a thought: Write a novel with a fetus as the narrator. "The idea struck me as so silly that I just couldn&rsquo;t resist it.&rdquo;

Ian McEwan&amp;nbsp;woke from a daydream with a thought: Write a novel with a fetus as the narrator. &quot;The idea struck me as so silly that I just couldn&amp;rsquo;t resist
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Ian McEwan woke from a daydream with a thought: Write a novel with a fetus as the narrator. "The idea struck me as so silly that I just couldn’t resist it.”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Burkini Ban

Embed from Getty Images In response to terrorist attacks, some French politicians sprang into action and imposed ordinances aimed at banning the burkini. For those who are not theological
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Embed from Getty Images In response to terrorist attacks, some French politicians sprang into action and imposed ordinances aimed at banning the burkini. For those who are not theological fashionistas, a burkini is essentially a more fashionable wet suit intended primarily for Moslem women who want to swim in public while remaining modestly dressed. The burkini is in some ways reminiscent of women’s swimwear of the early 1900s, but far less likely to result in death by drowning. The burkini is also popular with women who want to swim but would prefer to lower their chances of getting skin cancer. To be a bit more specific about the ban, the ordinances did not name the burkini, but rather forbid bathing attire that is not “appropriate,” that fails to be “respectful of good morals and of secularism,” and does not follow “hygiene and security rules.” There is a certain irony in the fact that being scantily clad on the beach was once considered in the West to be inappropriate and. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Phenomenal Intentionality

[New Entry by David Bourget and Angela Mendelovici on August 29, 2016.] Phenomenal intentionality is a kind of intentionality, or aboutness, that is grounded in phenomenal consciousness, the
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[New Entry by David Bourget and Angela Mendelovici on August 29, 2016.] Phenomenal intentionality is a kind of intentionality, or aboutness, that is grounded in phenomenal consciousness, the subjective, experiential feature of certain mental states. The phenomenal intentionality theory (PIT), is a theory of intentionality according to which there is phenomenal intentionality, and all other kinds of intentionality at least partly derive from it. In recent years, PIT has increasingly been seen as one of the main approaches to intentionality. 1. Introduction...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Expressing Our Attitudes: Explanation and Expression in Ethics, Volume 2

2016.08.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mark Schroeder, Expressing Our Attitudes: Explanation and Expression in Ethics, Volume 2, Oxford University Press, 2015, 266pp.,
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2016.08.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mark Schroeder, Expressing Our Attitudes: Explanation and Expression in Ethics, Volume 2, Oxford University Press, 2015, 266pp., $70.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198714149. Reviewed by Nate Charlow, University of Toronto Over the last decade -- owing largely to renewed philosophical interest in discourse what probably or likely or must be the case -- Expressivism has been revitalized as an empirical thesis about the semantics of natural language. The basic ideas -- for instance, the idea that to think that φ is probable is to exceed a certain threshold confidence in φ, rather than to bear the relation of outright belief to the propositional content that it is probable that φ, or the idea that one's confidence in an indicative conditional p → q equals one's conditional confidence in q given φ, rather than one's confidence in the truth of a conditional proposition -- have been in place for many decades now (especially. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News