Blame the dog

Roughly 40,000 years ago, Neanderthals dwindled and then vanished from Eurasia. What caused this die-off? Modern humans and their dogs…
Philosophy News image
Roughly 40,000 years ago, Neanderthals dwindled and then vanished from Eurasia. What caused this die-off? Modern humans and their dogs… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Music, nationalism, Christianity

To understand the decline of classical music, you need to understand what once made it great: nationalism and Christianity…
Philosophy News image
To understand the decline of classical music, you need to understand what once made it great: nationalism and Christianity… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Hegel, the End of History, and the Future

2015.03.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Eric Michael Dale, Hegel, the End of History, and the Future, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 256pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN
Philosophy News image
2015.03.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Eric Michael Dale, Hegel, the End of History, and the Future, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 256pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107063020. Reviewed by Laurence Dickey, University of Wisconsin-Madison On many levels Eric Michael Dale's book is impressive. It speaks well of his basic intelligence and the broad scope of his interests. Moreover, it shows him to be a curious and careful scholar as well as a talented writer who is capable of providing readers with clear expositions of Hegel's (and others) complex thinking. I admire these qualities of mind greatly. And I think it took academic courage to write this book the way it is written. The scope of Dale's work, however, is too broad -- that is to say, it is overfull and goes off in so many different directions and covers so many different thinkers and topics that it is difficult to review without neglecting themes that Dale has deemed central... . . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Wings of Desire

When a man loves a pigeon. Nikola Tesla had one true object of affection. She was pure white, with light-gray tips on her wings…
Philosophy News image
When a man loves a pigeon. Nikola Tesla had one true object of affection. She was pure white, with light-gray tips on her wings… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Life of John Aubrey

The biographer: glutton for anecdote, scavenger of detail, prisoner to tired conventions of chronology and storytelling…
Philosophy News image
The biographer: glutton for anecdote, scavenger of detail, prisoner to tired conventions of chronology and storytelling… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Sexual Paranoia Strikes Academe

Sex is leaky and anxiety-ridden, says Laura Kipnis, and no college policy or prohibition is going to change that. What rules will do is make students more vulnerable…
Philosophy News image
Sex is leaky and anxiety-ridden, says Laura Kipnis, and no college policy or prohibition is going to change that. What rules will do is make students more vulnerable… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Continuant Argument

I listed five false consequences of the standard view of personhood. Let me offer the continuant argument that I’m not a person. I mean, of course, that I am not essentially a person in the
Philosophy News image
I listed five false consequences of the standard view of personhood. Let me offer the continuant argument that I’m not a person. I mean, of course, that I am not essentially a person in the standard sense of personhood. I’d like to know where the argument goes wrong. I can’t see any place where it [...]

Continue reading . . .

News source: The Prosblogion

Experiment in Physics

[Revised entry by Allan Franklin and Slobodan Perovic on February 27, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, app7.html] Physics, and natural science in general, is a reasonable enterprise
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Allan Franklin and Slobodan Perovic on February 27, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, app7.html] Physics, and natural science in general, is a reasonable enterprise based on valid experimental evidence, criticism, and rational discussion. It provides us with knowledge of the physical world, and it is experiment that provides the evidence that grounds this knowledge. Experiment plays many roles in science. One of its important roles is to test theories and to provide the basis for scientific knowledge.[1]...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Spinoza, Self Help and Agency

View image | gettyimages.com The bookshelves of the world abound with tomes on self-help. Many of these profess to help people with various emotional woes, such as sadness, and make vague
Philosophy News image
View image | gettyimages.com The bookshelves of the world abound with tomes on self-help. Many of these profess to help people with various emotional woes, such as sadness, and make vague promises about happiness.  Interestingly enough, philosophers have long been in the business of offering advice on how to be happy. Or at least not too sad. Each spring semester I teach Modern Philosophy and cover our good dead friend Spinoza. In addition to an exciting career as a lens grinder, he also manage to avoid being killed by an assassin. However, breathing in all that glass dust seems to have ultimately contributed to his untimely death. But enough about his life and death, it is time to get to the point of this essay. As Spinoza saw it, people are slaves to their emotion and chained to what they love, such as fame, fortune and other people. This inevitably leads to sadness: the people we love betray us or die. That fancy Tesla can be smashed in a wreck. The beach house can be swept away. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Talking Philosophy

Genderalizations

Literary history is male-dominated. Literary journalism, too. But rest assured that editors are keenly aware of the problem…
Philosophy News image
Literary history is male-dominated. Literary journalism, too. But rest assured that editors are keenly aware of the problem… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily