Does the Legalization of Same-Sex Marriage Infringe on Religious Liberty?

View image | gettyimages.com In June, 2015 the United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of the legality of same-sex marriage. Many states had already legalized same-sex marriages and a
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View image | gettyimages.com In June, 2015 the United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of the legality of same-sex marriage. Many states had already legalized same-sex marriages and a majority of Americans think it should be legal. As such, the ruling seems to be consistent both with the constitution and with the democratic ideal of majority rule. There are, of course, those who object to the ruling. Some claim that the court acted in a way contrary to the democratic rule by engaging in judicial activism. Not surprisingly, some of those who make this claim were fine when the court ruled in ways they liked, despite the general principles being the same (that is, the court ruling in ways contrary to what voters had decided). I certainly do see the appeal of principle and consistent arguments against the Supreme Court engaging in activism and overruling what the voters have decided and there is certainly some merit in certain arguments against the same-sex marriage decision. However,. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

The Essence of the Self: In Defense of the Simple View of Personal Identity

2015.07.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Geoffrey Madell, The Essence of the Self: In Defense of the Simple View of Personal Identity, Routledge, 2015, 144pp., $140.00
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2015.07.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Geoffrey Madell, The Essence of the Self: In Defense of the Simple View of Personal Identity, Routledge, 2015, 144pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138823945. Reviewed by Daniel Giberman, University of Gothenburg In his new book on personal identity, Geoffrey Madell addresses the question, "What is it for states of consciousness, whether they occur at the same time or whether they occur over time, to be the conscious states of a single self?" (7, italics in original). The answer he defends is that there are "no logically constitutive criteria of the identity of the self" (ix). Rather, Madell claims, personal identity is "basic and not further analysable" (ix). This is the Simple View. Madell holds that personal identity centrally concerns the nature of and relations among conscious states as they obtain "from the point of view of the experiencing subject" (7). This first-person-focused claim is a crucial premise. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

To feel born too late, and to find that an ennobling failure, are very Czech emotions. And they permeate the work of a very Czech writer, <strong>Bohumil Hrabal</strong>

To feel born too late, and to find that an ennobling failure, are very Czech emotions. And they permeate the work of a very Czech writer, Bohumil
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To feel born too late, and to find that an ennobling failure, are very Czech emotions. And they permeate the work of a very Czech writer, Bohumil Hrabal

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

One of the functions of Nazism was social advancement, and few Nazis were as opportunistic as <strong>Joseph Goebbels</strong>. He embraced barbarism, but that was hardly unusual

One of the functions of Nazism was social advancement, and few Nazis were as opportunistic as Joseph Goebbels. He embraced barbarism, but that was hardly
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One of the functions of Nazism was social advancement, and few Nazis were as opportunistic as Joseph Goebbels. He embraced barbarism, but that was hardly unusual

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>David Foster Wallace</strong> has been canonized as self-help slacker saint, magnet for moral veneration. In short, the very thing he struggled against&nbsp;

David Foster Wallace has been canonized as self-help slacker saint, magnet for moral veneration. In short, the very thing he struggled
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David Foster Wallace has been canonized as self-help slacker saint, magnet for moral veneration. In short, the very thing he struggled against 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Definition of Lying and Deception

[Revised entry by James Edwin Mahon on June 30, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Questions central to the philosophical discussion of lying to others and other-deception (interpersonal
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[Revised entry by James Edwin Mahon on June 30, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Questions central to the philosophical discussion of lying to others and other-deception (interpersonal deceiving) may be divided into two kinds. Questions of the first kind are definitional (or conceptual). They include the questions of how lying is to be defined, how deceiving is to be defined, and whether lying is always a form of deceiving. Questions of the second kind are normative (more particularly, moral). They include the questions of whether lying and...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Chance and Temporal Asymmetry

2015.06.35 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Alastair Wilson (ed.), Chance and Temporal Asymmetry, Oxford University Press, 2014, 297pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2015.06.35 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Alastair Wilson (ed.), Chance and Temporal Asymmetry, Oxford University Press, 2014, 297pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199673421. Reviewed by Nina Emery, Brown University This collection of fourteen essays takes up questions about the nature of chance and of temporal asymmetry. Many are important extensions of well-known projects -- there are contributions from L. A. Paul on temporal experience, Jessica Wilson on the Humean denial of necessary connections, David Wallace on probability in quantum physics, and David Albert on the Mentaculus. But all are of interest as standalone pieces, and all include new ideas that address significant gaps in the existing literature. Readers who are not already well versed in the relevant literature will benefit from a careful reading of Alastair Wilson's introduction, which clearly and concisely reviews recent developments in philosophical thinking about chance and temporal. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy

2015.06.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Peter Olsthoorn,&#160;Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy, SUNY Press, 2015, 216pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781438455471.
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2015.06.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Peter Olsthoorn, Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy, SUNY Press, 2015, 216pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781438455471. Reviewed by Adam C. Pelser, United States Air Force Academy True to the description on the back cover, Peter Olsthoorn's book is more a "history of the development of ideas of honor in Western philosophy" than a philosophical defense of the proper role of honor in political and moral life. Yet, Olsthoorn relies on his discussions of both historical and contemporary accounts of honor to support the claim that, despite its reputation as an antiquated concept, honor can still be valuable for contemporary society. He nicely summarizes the scope and intent of the book in the introduction when he writes, "Drawing on moral philosophy from Cicero to Amartya Sen this book argues that honor, despite its limited role in our moral language, still has a role as a heuristic tool and an incentive to do... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

&ldquo;The <strong>love song</strong>, whether from Shakespeare or his lessers, is to the currency of our feelings what the dollar bill is to our economy, the dining-room table to our family life &ndash; the necessary, inevitable thing.&rdquo;

&amp;ldquo;The love song, whether from Shakespeare or his lessers, is to the currency of our feelings what the dollar bill is to our economy, the dining-room table to our family life &amp;ndash; the
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“The love song, whether from Shakespeare or his lessers, is to the currency of our feelings what the dollar bill is to our economy, the dining-room table to our family life – the necessary, inevitable thing.”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The editorial license of Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm. They <strong>stripped fairy tales</strong> of cruelty, licentiousness, rococo delirium, sophisticated comic irony

The editorial license of Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm. They stripped fairy tales of cruelty, licentiousness, rococo delirium, sophisticated comic
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The editorial license of Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm. They stripped fairy tales of cruelty, licentiousness, rococo delirium, sophisticated comic irony

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily