Skepticism About Moral Responsibility

Philosophy News image
[New Entry by Gregg Caruso on January 18, 2018.] Skepticism about moral responsibility, or what is more commonly referred to as moral responsibility skepticism, refers to a family of views that all take seriously the possibility that human beings are never morally responsible for their actions in a particular but pervasive sense. This sense is typically set apart by the notion of basic desert and is defined in terms of the control in action needed for an agent to be truly deserving of blame and praise. Some moral responsibility skeptics wholly reject this notion...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics: The Image of Nature

Philosophy News image
2018.01.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael James Bennett, Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics: The Image of Nature, Bloomsbury, 2017, 288pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474284677. Reviewed by Brent Adkins, Roanoke College The scholarship that examines Deleuze's use of and relation to Hellenic philosophy is rich and growing. Recent works include Sean Bowden's The Priority of Events and Ryan Johnson's The Deleuze-Lucretius Encounter. Michael James Bennett's book is a new and important contribution to this conversation. Not only does it give new insight into Deleuze's sources and arguments, but, in the spirit of Deleuze's history of philosophy, Bennett also allows us to see what the Stoics and Epicureans (and Deleuze with them) are creating in their thought. Chief among these creations, according to Bennett, is a new "image of nature." "Image of nature" is deployed here with technical specificity, meant to invoke Deleuze's use of the phrase... . . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Ibn Bâjja [Avempace]

Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Josép Puig Montada on January 17, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, aristotle-soul-arabic.html, ibn-bajja-biography.html, notes.html] Philosophy in Al-Andalus developed later than in the East; it grew among Muslims and Jews, since both communities were nurtured by a common Arabic. The Muslim community was much larger and it defined the cultural space, a significant part of which was made by Arabic translations of Greek scientifical and philosophical works. By the midst of the 10th century CE, materials related to...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy