<strong>Nabokov</strong> was self-involved, even callous. His fiction isn't praised for its compassion. But was he so uncaring as to leave a wounded man to die?

Nabokov was self-involved, even callous. His fiction isn&#39;t praised for its compassion. But was he so uncaring as to leave a wounded man to
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Nabokov was self-involved, even callous. His fiction isn't praised for its compassion. But was he so uncaring as to leave a wounded man to die?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Czeslaw Milosz</strong>, who witnessed Stalinist repression firsthand, is remembered as a political writer. Yet he always chafed against the label

Czeslaw Milosz, who witnessed Stalinist repression firsthand, is remembered as a political writer. Yet he always chafed against the
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Czeslaw Milosz, who witnessed Stalinist repression firsthand, is remembered as a political writer. Yet he always chafed against the label

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Scholars are painstakingly reproducing all of <strong>Emily Dickinson</strong>'s faintly penciled jottings. The undertaking is necessary and laudable. It's also misguided&nbsp;

Scholars are painstakingly reproducing all of Emily Dickinson&#39;s faintly penciled jottings. The undertaking is necessary and laudable. It&#39;s also
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Scholars are painstakingly reproducing all of Emily Dickinson's faintly penciled jottings. The undertaking is necessary and laudable. It's also misguided 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Foucault/Derrida Fifty Years Later: The Futures of Genealogy, Deconstruction, and Politics

2017.04.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Olivia Custer, Penelope Deutscher, and Samir Haddad (eds.), Foucault/Derrida Fifty Years Later: The Futures of Genealogy,
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2017.04.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Olivia Custer, Penelope Deutscher, and Samir Haddad (eds.), Foucault/Derrida Fifty Years Later: The Futures of Genealogy, Deconstruction, and Politics, Columbia University Press, 2016, 234pp., $35.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780231171953. Reviewed by Christopher Penfield, Sweet Briar College The 'debate' between Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida on the history of reason's exclusion of madness is famous for the polemical charge, rhetorical force, and intellectual acuity it displays. Less well-known are the debate's philosophical stakes, not only for the careers of Derrida and Foucault, but for the legacy of their competing methodologies for critical thought today. The aim of Olivia Custer, Penelope Deutscher, and Samir Haddad's edited volume is precisely to plumb and cultivate the critical philosophic wealth of a debate the dimensions of which have, until recently, gone all-too-untended. In their instructive. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Why shouldn’t we compel them to come in? Locke, the Enlightenment, and the debate over religious toleration

Most people in the West today unreflectively accept the need for religious toleration. Of course, if pressed, they will admit that toleration, like freedom of speech, can’t be absolute; there must
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Most people in the West today unreflectively accept the need for religious toleration. Of course, if pressed, they will admit that toleration, like freedom of speech, can’t be absolute; there must be some limits. Suppose, for example, that my religion calls for human sacrifice every Sunday; no one will think that such a religion should be tolerated. Again, if pressed, people will agree that there are difficult cases: to take an issue that troubled John Locke, suppose that my religion demands allegiance to a foreign power. We may think that reasonable people can disagree over such cases. But the fact that there are these problem cases doesn’t shake people’s commitment to the principle of religious toleration. We tend to be so wedded to this principle that we can easily forget how seductive the case for intolerance can be. Consider, for instance, a person who says with an authoritative air: “I know that my religion is the true one and that yours is completely false. I also know you will. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Airaksinen on Berkeley’s Theological Ethics

The 11th and final chapter of Idealism and Christian Theology is &amp;#8220;Idealistic Ethics and Berkeley&amp;#8217;s Good God&amp;#8221; by Timo Airaksinen. This is a rich, complex, and careful treatment of
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The 11th and final chapter of Idealism and Christian Theology is “Idealistic Ethics and Berkeley’s Good God” by Timo Airaksinen. This is a rich, complex, and careful treatment of Berkeley’s ethical thought. It is the only essay in the volume that pays careful attention to Berkeley’s own theological commitments. Further, by specific attention to the [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Earth Day 2017: reading for environmental & climate literacy

Earth Day is celebrated globally on 22 April in support of environmental protection. The theme for 2017’s Earth Day is “Environmental &amp;#038; Climate Literacy” – and we couldn’t think of a better way
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Earth Day is celebrated globally on 22 April in support of environmental protection. The theme for 2017’s Earth Day is “Environmental & Climate Literacy” – and we couldn’t think of a better way to celebrate knowledge of the environment and climate than with a reading list. These books, chapters, and articles can add to your understanding of Earth through topics such as climate change, natural phenomena, and what practical steps are being taken to help protect our planet. “Confronting the Consequences of Climate Change” from Adapting to a Changing Environment: Confronting the Consequences of Climate Change by Tim R. McClanahan and Joshua E. Cinner This chapter summarizes the available options for confronting the consequences of climate change through building local-scale adaptive capacity in societies and improving the condition of the natural resources on which people depend for their livelihoods. This first item in our reading list discusses how to simultaneously govern resource. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Universalizing Tactical Voting

I regularly come across two objections to tactical voting, i.e. voting for Lesser Evil rather than Good in hopes of defeating the Greater Evil candidate. &amp;nbsp;One objection is just the standard
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I regularly come across two objections to tactical voting, i.e. voting for Lesser Evil rather than Good in hopes of defeating the Greater Evil candidate.  One objection is just the standard worry that individual votes lack instrumental value, debunked here.  More interestingly, some worry that tactical voting is positively problematic, morally speaking, on grounds of its putative non-universalizability.On one version of the worry, tactical voting involves (something approaching) a contradiction in the will, insofar as even if those who most prefer Good constituted a majority, they could get stuck in the inferior equilibrium point of all (unnecessarily, and contrary to their collective preference) supporting Lesser Evil.  On another version of the worry, tactical voting involves (something like) a contradiction in conception, insofar as it involves responding to how others plan to vote, which might seem to depend upon those others voting non-tactically, i.e. not waiting. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

Why are we still interested in the story of the <strong>Benson family</strong>? Sure, it includes eccentrics, Victorian patriarchs, and repressed sexuality. But also: That clan couldn&rsquo;t stop writing

Why are we still interested in the story of the Benson family? Sure, it includes eccentrics, Victorian patriarchs, and repressed sexuality. But also: That clan couldn&amp;rsquo;t stop
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Why are we still interested in the story of the Benson family? Sure, it includes eccentrics, Victorian patriarchs, and repressed sexuality. But also: That clan couldn’t stop writing

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Snobs: we hate them, but can we live without them? Insolence, ostentation, and the cultivation of <strong>arbitrary superiority</strong> help make us all who we are

Snobs: we hate them, but can we live without them? Insolence, ostentation, and the cultivation of arbitrary superiority help make us all who we
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Snobs: we hate them, but can we live without them? Insolence, ostentation, and the cultivation of arbitrary superiority help make us all who we are

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily