<strong>The <em>Pickwick</em> craze</strong>. More than a serial novel, it was a Victorian phenomenon: merchandise (hats, soaps), spinoffs (bootleg editions, joke books). It was the birth of modern mass culture

The Pickwick craze. More than a serial novel, it was a Victorian phenomenon: merchandise (hats, soaps), spinoffs (bootleg editions, joke books). It was the birth of modern mass
The Pickwick craze. More than a serial novel, it was a Victorian phenomenon: merchandise (hats, soaps), spinoffs (bootleg editions, joke books). It was the birth of modern mass [More]

The Japanese literary scene is plagued by rehashed American literature. Contemporary novelists are &ldquo;<strong>brainless writers of crap</strong>.&rdquo; Exhibit A: Haruki Murakami

The Japanese literary scene is plagued by rehashed American literature. Contemporary novelists are &amp;ldquo;brainless writers of crap.&amp;rdquo; Exhibit A: Haruki
The Japanese literary scene is plagued by rehashed American literature. Contemporary novelists are “brainless writers of crap.” Exhibit A: Haruki [More]

In the &lsquo;20s, a female sculptor like <strong>Barbara Hepworth</strong> had three options: assimilate, decorate, or detonate. She chose the third

In the &amp;lsquo;20s, a female sculptor like Barbara Hepworth had three options: assimilate, decorate, or detonate. She chose the
In the ‘20s, a female sculptor like Barbara Hepworth had three options: assimilate, decorate, or detonate. She chose the [More]

Vanishing Into Things

2015.06.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Barry Allen,&#160;Vanishing Into Things, Harvard University Press, 2015, 289pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674335912. Reviewed by
2015.06.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Barry Allen, Vanishing Into Things, Harvard University Press, 2015, 289pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674335912. Reviewed by [More]

Logical Constants

[Revised entry by John MacFarlane on June 18, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Logic is usually thought to concern itself only with features that sentences and arguments possess in
[Revised entry by John MacFarlane on June 18, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Logic is usually thought to concern itself only with features that sentences and arguments possess in [More]

After Physics

2015.06.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Z. Albert,&#160;After Physics, Harvard University Press, 2015, 181pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674731264. Reviewed by David
2015.06.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Z. Albert, After Physics, Harvard University Press, 2015, 181pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674731264. Reviewed by David [More]

&nbsp;&ldquo;I&rsquo;m after <em>me</em>,&rdquo; explained <strong>Edward Hopper</strong>. He hoped to find himself in what he painted, which explains the mystery of his art

&amp;nbsp;&amp;ldquo;I&amp;rsquo;m after me,&amp;rdquo; explained Edward Hopper. He hoped to find himself in what he painted, which explains the mystery of his
 “I’m after me,” explained Edward Hopper. He hoped to find himself in what he painted, which explains the mystery of his [More]

The trouble with <strong>new nature writing</strong>. Books by Helen Macdonald and Robert Macfarlane purport to be about wildness. Why are they so tame?

The trouble with new nature writing. Books by Helen Macdonald and Robert Macfarlane purport to be about wildness. Why are they so
The trouble with new nature writing. Books by Helen Macdonald and Robert Macfarlane purport to be about wildness. Why are they so [More]

Reforming the Art of Living: Nature, Virtue, and Religion in Descartes's Epistemology

2015.06.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rico Vitz,&#160;Reforming the Art of Living: Nature, Virtue, and Religion in Descartes&#39;s Epistemology, Springer, 2015, 154pp., $129.00
2015.06.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rico Vitz, Reforming the Art of Living: Nature, Virtue, and Religion in Descartes's Epistemology, Springer, 2015, 154pp., $129.00 [More]

<strong>Henry James loved his mother</strong> and was desperate to get away from her. It&rsquo;s no coincidence that some of his best novels have no mothers at all

Henry James loved his mother and was desperate to get away from her. It&amp;rsquo;s no coincidence that some of his best novels have no mothers at
Henry James loved his mother and was desperate to get away from her. It’s no coincidence that some of his best novels have no mothers at [More]