Religious Beliefs-Rational or Irrational?

Just as atheists can claim, “Religion is not true, it is useful”, the religious adherent can claim the same about atheists. Philosophical and psychological arguments about “who’s right” tend to be inconclusive largely for the same reasons evidence for and against religious truth claims are.
Just as atheists can claim, “Religion is not true, it is useful”, the religious adherent can claim the same about atheists. Philosophical and psychological arguments about “who’s right” tend to be inconclusive largely for the same reasons evidence for and against religious truth claims are. [More]

Robert McKim on Religious Diversity—Part 2

According to Dr. Robert McKim, "Many religious perspectives make sense from the inside and have associated with them forms of life and a host of experiences that simply are inaccessible to most outsiders. So some have evidence that others lack. And access to all of the relevant evidence is beyond any one of us. We should all face up to this and adjust our attitudes to others and to their beliefs accordingly." Do you agree? [More]

Robert McKim on Religious Diversity–Part 1

Everyone should recognize that many religious perspectives other than their own are endorsed by many people of integrity. Broadly speaking I favor the idea of being interested in others as they are, and the idea of adopting an exploratory, courteous, kind, and inquisitive approach to them and to their views and insights.
Everyone should recognize that many religious perspectives other than their own are endorsed by many people of integrity. Broadly speaking I favor the idea of being interested in others as they are, and the idea of adopting an exploratory, courteous, kind, and inquisitive approach to them and to their views and insights. [More]

Gotham’s State of Nature

Hobbes referred to the state of nature as a “war of all against all” and famously described life in the state of nature as “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.” In order to transition a society from the state of nature to civility, its people mutually agreed to create a state and give up their power to the state in return for the protection of their well-being.
Hobbes referred to the state of nature as a “war of all against all” and famously described life in the state of nature as “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.” In order to transition a society from the state of nature to civility, its people mutually agreed to create a state and give up their power to the state in return for the protection of their well-being. [More]

Like Sheep to the Slaughter?

Most societies revere the individual liberty exercised in the right to speak freely without fear of punishment. Conversely, most societies equally cherish and demand respect for one’s religious beliefs. Nonetheless, it is a philosophical challenge to advocate unrestrained free speech while maintaining respectful consideration of religious beliefs.
Most societies revere the individual liberty exercised in the right to speak freely without fear of punishment. Conversely, most societies equally cherish and demand respect for one’s religious beliefs. Nonetheless, it is a philosophical challenge to advocate unrestrained free speech while maintaining respectful consideration of religious beliefs. [More]

5 Reasons Why I Love Philosophy

Ever wonder about philosophy? If so, you've philosophized. Ever wonder if there is value in wondering? Rick Pimentel explores these questions and gives us some reasons why he thinks philosophy is one of the most valuable discplines available to mankind.
Ever wonder about philosophy? If so, you've philosophized. Ever wonder if there is value in wondering? Rick Pimentel explores these questions and gives us some reasons why he thinks philosophy is one of the most valuable discplines available to mankind. [More]

Privacy: A Thing of the Past?–Part II

Are social networks deteriorating important social boundaries or enhancing personal relationships? As social networks grow and become more integrated into the lives of many, ethical philosophers have new, uncharted territory to explore.
Are social networks deteriorating important social boundaries or enhancing personal relationships? As social networks grow and become more integrated into the lives of many, ethical philosophers have new, uncharted territory to explore. [More]

To God, I’m the Loyal Opposition

I’ve read many psychologists that warn about focusing too much on a person or a group you hate because in doing so you risk becoming just like them. I think some modern atheists may be falling prey to this problem.
I’ve read many psychologists that warn about focusing too much on a person or a group you hate because in doing so you risk becoming just like them. I think some modern atheists may be falling prey to this problem. [More]

Privacy: A Thing of the Past?

Most philosophers have agreed that privacy is a good or a right. With the exception of Plato and Aristotle (they viewed privacy as a negative concept), philosophers generally have promoted privacy as a necessary component for a prosperous and happy society. But privacy seems to be eroding in Western society. Why? And is this okay?
Most philosophers have agreed that privacy is a good or a right. With the exception of Plato and Aristotle (they viewed privacy as a negative concept), philosophers generally have promoted privacy as a necessary component for a prosperous and happy society. But privacy seems to be eroding in Western society. Why? And is this okay? [More]

The Supreme Court and Philosophy

One of the most significant political and legal events of the year was The Supreme Court case in February, United States v. Alvarez. The Supreme Court consented to hear this case regarding the validity of the Stolen Valor Act of 2005. It was as if Socrates himself was there in the court. The dialectical method used by the judges was evident as they utilized questions to obtain the judgments required by this case. [More]