Is Tolerance Self-Undermining?

In light of all of the hullaballoo surrounding Brendan Eich’s resignation from Mozilla for his political views regarding same sex marriage, I have been musing over the meaning and practice of “tolerance”. In the name of “tolerance”, Eich was pressured to resign because he is supposedly intolerant of same sex marriage. However, supporters of Eich contend that this is just being intolerant in a different way, by refusing to tolerate Eich’s political beliefs. Who is right? In some ways, I think neither is, because the notion of “tolerance” seems to be self-contradictory, or at least, self-undermining. [More]

The Fort Hood Shooting: An Insider's Look

Kelly Perez, the spouse of an active member of the military, reflects on the tradegy of the Fort Hood shooting. For men and women that have bonded through the intensity of military service, murder-suicide creates a dichotomy of emotions in fellow soldiers and their spouses alike.
Kelly Perez, the spouse of an active member of the military, reflects on the tradegy of the Fort Hood shooting. For men and women that have bonded through the intensity of military service, murder-suicide creates a dichotomy of emotions in fellow soldiers and their spouses alike. [More]

Leontion: The Lost Woman Philosopher

Who was this brash, intelligent, ancient philosopher Leontion? We do know she was a woman that garnered both respect and vitriol from her peers. Epicurus praised her. Cicero disapproved. If we only knew why.
Who was this brash, intelligent, ancient philosopher Leontion? We do know she was a woman that garnered both respect and vitriol from her peers. Epicurus praised her. Cicero disapproved. If we only knew why. [More]

Why Supporting a Team isn't Like Choosing a Washing Machine

Once you have made something your goal, it comes to have a special importance for you, but not for those who lack it, in a way it didn’t before. So it is with supporting a team. Once you become a fan, the success of the team becomes one of your projects—and to that extent, I would say, there is nothing irrational in your partisanship.
Once you have made something your goal, it comes to have a special importance for you, but not for those who lack it, in a way it didn’t before. So it is with supporting a team. Once you become a fan, the success of the team becomes one of your projects—and to that extent, I would say, there is nothing irrational in your partisanship. [More]

Philosophy Can Change Your Life

Dr. Andrew Jeffrey introduces philosophy in a concise, accessible way. In this article, he talks about the differences between philosophy, religion, poetry, and science, and how philosophy fits in our modern world.
Dr. Andrew Jeffrey introduces philosophy in a concise, accessible way. In this article, he talks about the differences between philosophy, religion, poetry, and science, and how philosophy fits in our modern world. [More]

The Ties That Bind . . . are Tribal

When we're confronted with new ideas, we have a strong tendency to retreat to the beliefs we're comfortable with. This cognitive bias keeps us safe but also prevents us from seeing the errors in our own thinking and makes our world smaller than it should be. It's time to leave the cave of tribalism and embrace the unknown. It's risky and potentially painful but absolutely necessary. [More]

What Can Be Learned from Bertrand Russell’s Life as a Philanderer? Part IV

Bertrand Russell may have learned at the end of his life something that may have given him more peace and identity had he learned it earlier. His seeming inability to maintain a solid, loving relationship with a single woman was a symptom of a much more significant issue. By looking at his life, we possibly can save our own.
Bertrand Russell may have learned at the end of his life something that may have given him more peace and identity had he learned it earlier. His seeming inability to maintain a solid, loving relationship with a single woman was a symptom of a much more significant issue. By looking at his life, we possibly can save our own. [More]

What Can Be Learned from Bertrand Russell’s Life as a Philanderer? Part III

As Bertrand Russell moved from relationship to relationship, Russell eased into old age with Edith, his fourth wife and something with whom he experienced 'great happiness.' During this time, something appears to have changed in his temperment as well--a mellowness and comfort with life. Did his relationship with Edith help him finally discover something he sought all his life? [More]

What Can Be Learned from Bertrand Russell’s Life as a Philanderer? Part I

Russell springs to mind hunched over a cluttered bureau, suckling the temples of his spectacles in deep coitus with a battered tome, caring not for what might lie beyond its pages. This image is not, however, entirely accurate; he was not so musty and desolate in the way of his pigeonhole. He is remembered grandly as a philosopher, a mathematician, a revolutionary—but by no means least as a philanderer. [More]

What Can Be Learned from Bertrand Russell’s Life as a Philanderer? Part II

This second of four articles on Bertrand Russell's relationship with women surveys some of the relationships Russell had with women icnluding Ottoline Morrell, Dora Black, and Constance Malleson. His relationships provide an interesting and provacative insight into his complex personality.
This second of four articles on Bertrand Russell's relationship with women surveys some of the relationships Russell had with women icnluding Ottoline Morrell, Dora Black, and Constance Malleson. His relationships provide an interesting and provacative insight into his complex personality. [More]