Philosopher of the month: Confucius [infographic]

This October, the OUP Philosophy team honors Confucius (551 BC–479 BC) as their Philosopher of the Month. Recognized today as China’s greatest teacher, Confucius was an early philosopher whose
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This October, the OUP Philosophy team honors Confucius (551 BC–479 BC) as their Philosopher of the Month. Recognized today as China’s greatest teacher, Confucius was an early philosopher whose influence on intellectual and social history extended well beyond the boundaries of China. Born in the state of Lu during the Zhou dynasty, Confucius dedicated his life to teaching, and believed he was called to reform the decaying Zhou culture. A symbolic and controversial figure, his philosophy is primarily moral and political in nature. Confucius taught that moral order must be brought about by human action. His lessons emphasized moral cultivation, stressed literacy, and demanded that his students be enthusiastic, serious, and self-reflective. Confucius taught that all persons, especially members of the ruling class, must develop moral integrity through ritual action, expressing care and empathy in order to become a consummate person.  An innovative teacher, his school was open to all. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Does anyone know what mental health is?

The concept of mental health lives a double life. On the one hand it denotes a state today universally valued. Not simply valued but newly prioritised by governments, hospitals, schools, employers,
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The concept of mental health lives a double life. On the one hand it denotes a state today universally valued. Not simply valued but newly prioritised by governments, hospitals, schools, employers, charities and so on. Expressions such as “mental capital” or “mental wealth of nations” appear in official reports and high profile articles emphasising the importance of public policy aimed directly at enhancing mental health. You’d think that when something is so valuable and so uncontroversially prized, there’d be an accepted definition of it. I am not asking for knowledge of the nature mental health and its causes, just a statement of what counts and doesn’t count as mental health. After all it’s hard to value something when you don’t know what to point at when you name it. And yet when you look closely at the existing efforts to define mental health, all you see is a multitude of definitions being bandied around with little consensus. Mental health appears to be. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

The <strong>Instagram poet Rupi Kaur</strong> outsells Homer 10 to 1. Her secret? Human experience, aestheticized and monetized, rendered inspirational and relatable

The Instagram poet Rupi Kaur outsells Homer 10 to 1. Her secret? Human experience, aestheticized and monetized, rendered inspirational and
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The Instagram poet Rupi Kaur outsells Homer 10 to 1. Her secret? Human experience, aestheticized and monetized, rendered inspirational and relatable

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Sylvia Plath at Smith.</strong> &ldquo;I&rsquo;m so happy here I could cry!&rdquo; she wrote to her mother. In her journals, she struck a different note: &ldquo;God, who am I? ... I&rsquo;m lost.&rdquo;

Sylvia Plath at Smith. &amp;ldquo;I&amp;rsquo;m so happy here I could cry!&amp;rdquo; she wrote to her mother. In her journals, she struck a different note: &amp;ldquo;God, who am I? ... I&amp;rsquo;m
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Sylvia Plath at Smith. “I’m so happy here I could cry!” she wrote to her mother. In her journals, she struck a different note: “God, who am I? ... I’m lost.”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The eccentric life of <strong>Ignatius Donnelly.</strong> An unsuccessful land speculator and politician, he put his apocalyptic views to use by writing the story of Atlantis

The eccentric life of Ignatius Donnelly. An unsuccessful land speculator and politician, he put his apocalyptic views to use by writing the story of
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The eccentric life of Ignatius Donnelly. An unsuccessful land speculator and politician, he put his apocalyptic views to use by writing the story of Atlantis

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Bump Stocks

Listening to audio from the shooting in Las Vegas, many people concluded the gunman had used automatic weapons. However, it turned out that he had used legally purchased semi-automatic rifles that
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Listening to audio from the shooting in Las Vegas, many people concluded the gunman had used automatic weapons. However, it turned out that he had used legally purchased semi-automatic rifles that had been legally modified with bump stocks. Normal semi-automatic weapons fire as fast as the user can pull the trigger, but only one shot is fired per trigger pull. A bump stock does not change the way the gun fires, rather it speeds up the rate of fire by using the recoil of the gun to push the trigger against the user’s trigger finger. If a person could manually pull the trigger as fast, the result would be the same—but such rapid pull is not something people are generally capable of doing. While a bump stock boosts the rate of fire of a semiautomatic weapon, it does so at the cost of accuracy—the weapon bumping makes it considerably harder to aim properly. When used at a gun range, the usual point of the bump stock is to have the thrill of firing an “automatic” weapon and, as such,. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

The Social and Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft

2017.10.07 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sandrine Berg&#232;s and Alan Coffee (eds.), The Social and Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft, Oxford University Press 2017,
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2017.10.07 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sandrine Bergès and Alan Coffee (eds.), The Social and Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft, Oxford University Press 2017, 247 pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198766841. Reviewed by Ruth Hagengruber, Paderborn University Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), a famous and prolific writer whose work was translated into several languages during her lifetime, reflected on the philosophical and political issues connected with the topics current at that time. Her ideas focus on important themes such as how a community organizes itself and what is wrong with the general positions of women in society. Today, her writing serves as an example of a proto-feminist approach which articulates this special problem of the sexes as an elementary moment in political philosophy. Nonetheless, although these issues have continued to be relevant, Wollstonecraft's position is debated within feminist theory. Her writings satisfy the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Few women were associated with <em>Partisan Review</em>, and even fewer had identities as something more than literary wives. Consider <strong>Elizabeth Hardwick</strong>

Few women were associated with Partisan Review, and even fewer had identities as something more than literary wives. Consider Elizabeth
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Few women were associated with Partisan Review, and even fewer had identities as something more than literary wives. Consider Elizabeth Hardwick

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>James C. Scott</strong>&nbsp;faults civilization for destroying the freedom and equality of our ancestors. But civilization is why we value such ideals in the first place

James C. Scott&amp;nbsp;faults civilization for destroying the freedom and equality of our ancestors. But civilization is why we value such ideals in the first
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James C. Scott faults civilization for destroying the freedom and equality of our ancestors. But civilization is why we value such ideals in the first place

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Philosophers have criticized luxury</strong>&nbsp;for a long time. But the consensus has always had its critics: the philosophers who like stuff

Philosophers have criticized luxury&amp;nbsp;for a long time. But the consensus has always had its critics: the philosophers who like
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Philosophers have criticized luxury for a long time. But the consensus has always had its critics: the philosophers who like stuff

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily