Right-to-Try

There has been a surge of support for right-to-try bills and many states have passed these into law. Congress, eager to do something politically easy and popular, has also jumped on this bandwagon.
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There has been a surge of support for right-to-try bills and many states have passed these into law. Congress, eager to do something politically easy and popular, has also jumped on this bandwagon. Briefly put, the right-to-try laws give terminally ill patients the right to try experimental treatments that have completed Phase 1 testing but have yet to be approved by the FDA. Phase 1 testing involves assessing the immediate toxicity of the treatment. This does not include testing its efficacy or its longer-term safety. Crudely put, passing Phase 1 just means that the treatment does not immediately kill or significantly harm patients. On the face of it, the right-to-try is something that no sensible person would oppose. After all, the gist of this right is that people who have “nothing to lose” are given the right to try treatments that might help them. The bills that propose to codify the right into law make use of the rhetorical narrative that the right-to-try laws would give. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Insolubles

[Revised entry by Paul Vincent Spade and Stephen Read on August 7, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] The medieval name for paradoxes like the famous Liar Paradox ("This
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[Revised entry by Paul Vincent Spade and Stephen Read on August 7, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] The medieval name for paradoxes like the famous Liar Paradox ("This proposition is false") was "insolubles" or insolubilia, [1] though besides semantic paradoxes, they included epistemic paradoxes, e.g., "You do not know this proposition". From the late-twelfth century to the end of the Middle Ages and beyond, such paradoxes were discussed at length by an enormous number of authors....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Friendship

[Revised entry by Bennett Helm on August 7, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Friendship, as understood here, is a distinctively personal relationship that is grounded in a
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[Revised entry by Bennett Helm on August 7, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Friendship, as understood here, is a distinctively personal relationship that is grounded in a concern on the part of each friend for the welfare of the other, for the other's sake, and that involves some degree of intimacy. As such, friendship is undoubtedly central to our lives, in part because the special concern we have for our friends must have a place within a broader set of concerns, including moral concerns, and in part because our friends can help shape who we are as persons. Given this centrality, important...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Blind Scholar

[Originally published March 2011] The Internet Encyclopaedia of Philosophy (IEP), an invaluable [sometimes] peer-reviewed resource established by Jim Fieser, has this to say of the work of one
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[Originally published March 2011] The Internet Encyclopaedia of Philosophy (IEP), an invaluable [sometimes] peer-reviewed resource established by Jim Fieser, has this to say of the work of one particular thinker from the 3rd Century A.D: The work of Diogenes [Laertius] is a crude contribution towards the history of philosophy…the author is limited in his philosophical abilities and assessment of the various schools…  and is entertaining as a sort of pot-pourri on the subject. Diogenes also includes samples of his own wretched poetry about the philosophers he discusses.. [and] is generally as reliable as whatever source he happens to be copying from at that moment. ** The IEP “is actively seeking an author who will write a replacement article”, but this “anonymous” piece presently stands as the IEP ‘obituary’ to a thinker who produced ten volumes on the history of ideas.  Our entry’s writer (A) concedes Diogenes’ ‘Lives of the Philosophers’ is “an important source of. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Wherever there is anger and agony, there is <em>Guernica</em>. What is it about <strong>Picasso's mural </strong>that answers our need for an epitome of death &ndash; and for life in the face of it?

Wherever there is anger and agony, there is Guernica. What is it about Picasso&#39;s mural that answers our need for an epitome of death &amp;ndash; and for life in the face of
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Wherever there is anger and agony, there is Guernica. What is it about Picasso's mural that answers our need for an epitome of death – and for life in the face of it?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Toscanini's resolute anti-fascism </strong>endeared him to fair-minded people. But it's a mistake to connect his political integrity to his music-making

Toscanini&#39;s resolute anti-fascism endeared him to fair-minded people. But it&#39;s a mistake to connect his political integrity to his
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Toscanini's resolute anti-fascism endeared him to fair-minded people. But it's a mistake to connect his political integrity to his music-making

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>E.H. Carr </strong>is best known for being consistently and egregiously wrong. But his treatment of historical change endures as a bulwark against despair

E.H. Carr is best known for being consistently and egregiously wrong. But his treatment of historical change endures as a bulwark against
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E.H. Carr is best known for being consistently and egregiously wrong. But his treatment of historical change endures as a bulwark against despair

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Justice as a Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective

2017.08.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jean Porter, Justice as a Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective, Eerdmans, 2016, 300pp., $40 (pbk), ISBN&#160;9780802873255. &#160; Reviewed
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2017.08.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jean Porter, Justice as a Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective, Eerdmans, 2016, 300pp., $40 (pbk), ISBN 9780802873255.   Reviewed by Stephen Chanderbhan, Canisius College Is justice primarily a virtue that institutions can have; or is it primarily a virtue that persons can have? Many thinkers take the former to be true. For example, on most social contract accounts (e.g., Rawls’s), justice is characterized first in terms of principles that help to structure a community. People are seen as just or unjust based on their actions relative to those principles. Thinkers in the Thomistic tradition, on the other hand, take justice to be primarily something that persons can have -- a virtue. Accordingly, a couple questions may be asked of Thomistic thinkers: first, what does it even mean for justice to be a virtue; and, second, how would a Thomistic view of justice resemble other traditions’... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Secrets of the comma

When it comes to punctuation, I’m a lumper rather than a splitter. Some nights I lie awake, pondering to secrets of commas, dashes, parentheses, and more, looking for grand patterns. The post
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When it comes to punctuation, I’m a lumper rather than a splitter. Some nights I lie awake, pondering to secrets of commas, dashes, parentheses, and more, looking for grand patterns. “Is something bothering you?” my wife asks. “Yes,” I reply. “Commas.” Style guides give a baker’s dozen of comma rules, which seem like a lot to remember. Some writers even distinguish commas by name: adverbial commas, appositive commas, clausal commas, phrasal commas, quotational commas, salutational commas, vocative commas, conjunctional commas, elliptical commas, list commas, and Oxford commas. Whew. Others adhere to the “put a comma anywhere you’d pause” idea. The pause approach really doesn’t work (especially if you are prone to dramatic speech). Commas may have once been used to indicate pauses, but today they are keyed to the grammar of sentences. In my most optimistic moments, I like to think that comma use can be organized according to just two broad themes. Commas combine. Commas coordinate. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

Anomaly v Huemer on Immigration

People often assume that to allow immigration is an act of charity: a country generously sharing its land and institutions with outsiders who have no real claim to be there. &amp;nbsp;Michael Huemer&#39;s
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People often assume that to allow immigration is an act of charity: a country generously sharing its land and institutions with outsiders who have no real claim to be there.  Michael Huemer's work forcefully upends this assumption, showing that immigration restrictions are in fact a form of harmful coercion (like blocking a starving man from accessing a public market where he could trade for food). This reconceptualisation shifts the argumentative "burden", insofar as we generally accept that it is much more difficult to justify coercively harming someone (a seeming rights-violation) than to merely refrain from assisting them.Jonny Anomaly, in a recent blog post on the issue, seems to miss this key feature of Huemer's argument, instead characterizing Huemer's argument in terms of "mutually beneficial gains", and responding that "although a small number of voluntary transactions may benefit all parties, this does not entail that a large series of transactions will. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera