Mortal Imitations of Divine Life: The Nature of the Soul in Aristotle's De Anima

2017.05.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Eli Diamond, Mortal Imitations of Divine Life: The Nature of the Soul in Aristotle's De Anima, Northwestern University Press,
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2017.05.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Eli Diamond, Mortal Imitations of Divine Life: The Nature of the Soul in Aristotle's De Anima, Northwestern University Press, 2015, 333pp., $39.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780810130692. Reviewed by Klaus Corcilius, University of California, Berkeley This is a book not on Plato, as the main title might suggest, but on Aristotle's De anima (DA). Eli Diamond offers a reading of the DA as "quietly but constantly theological", according to which "mind" (41) is the formal and final cause of all kinds of soul (nutritive, perceptual, noetic). Each stage on the ascending series of kinds of soul described in DA II 3 is, as Diamond writes in his preface, the "very activity, which is God, though with starkly varying degrees of success." (xi). This is a thesis reminiscent of Plotinus Enn. III 8 (not mentioned by Diamond), but completely unacceptable as an interpretation of the text of the DA: there is no passage in the work, or. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Writers once sought silence, exile, and cunning. Today they seek dialogue, community, and workshopping. What's lost when <strong>writers are afraid</strong> to stand alone?

Writers once sought silence, exile, and cunning. Today they seek dialogue, community, and workshopping. What&#39;s lost when writers are afraid to stand
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Writers once sought silence, exile, and cunning. Today they seek dialogue, community, and workshopping. What's lost when writers are afraid to stand alone?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

For 50 years, William F. Buckley Jr. policed the <strong>boundaries of conservatism</strong>, casting out extremists, bigots, kooks, anti-Semites, and racists. Or so he thought

For 50 years, William F. Buckley Jr. policed the boundaries of conservatism, casting out extremists, bigots, kooks, anti-Semites, and racists. Or so he
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For 50 years, William F. Buckley Jr. policed the boundaries of conservatism, casting out extremists, bigots, kooks, anti-Semites, and racists. Or so he thought

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

You&rsquo;re in your early 20s, your first book is a big success, you're called a genius. How would you react? If you're <strong>Dostoevsky</strong>, you'd become an insufferable jerk

You&amp;rsquo;re in your early 20s, your first book is a big success, you&#39;re called a genius. How would you react? If you&#39;re Dostoevsky, you&#39;d become an insufferable
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You’re in your early 20s, your first book is a big success, you're called a genius. How would you react? If you're Dostoevsky, you'd become an insufferable jerk

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Intuition

[Revised entry by Joel Pust on May 9, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement.html] This entry addresses the nature and epistemological role of intuition by considering the following
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[Revised entry by Joel Pust on May 9, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement.html] This entry addresses the nature and epistemological role of intuition by considering the following questions: (1) What are intuitions?, (2) What roles do they serve in philosophical (and other "armchair") inquiry?, (3) Ought they serve such roles?, (4) What are the implications of the empirical investigation of intuitions for their proper roles?, and (in the supplementary document titled "The Logical Structure of the Method of Cases")...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Thomas Aquinas on War and Peace

2017.05.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gregory M. Reichberg, Thomas Aquinas on War and Peace, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 302pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.05.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gregory M. Reichberg, Thomas Aquinas on War and Peace, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 302pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107019904. Reviewed by G. Scott Davis, University of Richmond Given the many avatars of Aquinas stalking the contemporary stage -- from the quasi-Kantian of John Finnis to James Turner Johnson's Augustinian to Richard Miller's crypto-pacifist -- it is good to have an overview grounded in the full spectrum of St. Thomas's works, informed as well by his early modern commentators and contemporary critics. Gregory M. Reichberg is doubtless correct that understanding the scope of Thomas's work and its historical development are essential to grasping what he is up to in his various discussions of war and peace. I'll say a bit about how much and what sort of historical stage-setting is essential in a moment.[1] The book has two parts. The first "was written as a single unit," in... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Technische/n Angestellte/n

Job List:&amp;nbsp; Europe Name of institution:&amp;nbsp; Hochschule Esslingen
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
Hochschule Esslingen
Town: 
Esslingen am Neckar
Country: 
Germany . . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Canons are formed through critical consensus. Yet consider this: None of the five most profitable films are canonical. You've probably seen them, but <strong>don't feel guilty</strong>

Canons are formed through critical consensus. Yet consider this: None of the five most profitable films are canonical. You&#39;ve probably seen them, but don&#39;t feel
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Canons are formed through critical consensus. Yet consider this: None of the five most profitable films are canonical. You've probably seen them, but don't feel guilty

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

How Martin Luther King Jr., who married a black sound &mdash; a rhythm, a style &mdash; to flawless Standard English, helped make "<strong>black talk</strong>" America's lingua franca&nbsp;

How Martin Luther King Jr., who married a black sound &amp;mdash; a rhythm, a style &amp;mdash; to flawless Standard English, helped make &quot;black talk&quot; America&#39;s lingua
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How Martin Luther King Jr., who married a black sound — a rhythm, a style — to flawless Standard English, helped make "black talk" America's lingua franca 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Poor Nietzsche</strong>. Not only is he blamed for World War I and Nazism, but he's maligned as the godfather of postmodern relativism. Nonsense. He was a champion of the Enlightenment

Poor Nietzsche. Not only is he blamed for World War I and Nazism, but he&#39;s maligned as the godfather of postmodern relativism. Nonsense. He was a champion of the
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Poor Nietzsche. Not only is he blamed for World War I and Nazism, but he's maligned as the godfather of postmodern relativism. Nonsense. He was a champion of the Enlightenment

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily