<strong>Hypocrisy</strong> is a limited measure of moral failing. It doesn't test for goodness, badness, efficacy, or intention. If the goal is less to be consistent than to be better, we need a more exacting metric

Hypocrisy is a limited measure of moral failing. It doesn&#39;t test for goodness, badness, efficacy, or intention. If the goal is less to be consistent than to be better, we need a more exacting
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Hypocrisy is a limited measure of moral failing. It doesn't test for goodness, badness, efficacy, or intention. If the goal is less to be consistent than to be better, we need a more exacting metric

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Gay Talese</strong>&rsquo;s eye for detail has made him a legend. But his obsession with observation can preclude deeper insights

Gay Talese&amp;rsquo;s eye for detail has made him a legend. But his obsession with observation can preclude deeper
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Gay Talese’s eye for detail has made him a legend. But his obsession with observation can preclude deeper insights

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In the 1960s and '70s, Habermas, Rorty, and their generation of philosophers focused almost exclusively on language. A singular exception: <strong>Foucault</strong>, who matters now more than ever

In the 1960s and &#39;70s, Habermas, Rorty, and their generation of philosophers focused almost exclusively on language. A singular exception: Foucault, who matters now more than
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In the 1960s and '70s, Habermas, Rorty, and their generation of philosophers focused almost exclusively on language. A singular exception: Foucault, who matters now more than ever

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Stain Removal: Ethics and Race

2017.03.06 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews J. Reid Miller, Stain Removal: Ethics and Race, Oxford University Press, 2017, 204pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190280970.
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2017.03.06 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews J. Reid Miller, Stain Removal: Ethics and Race, Oxford University Press, 2017, 204pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190280970. Reviewed by Naomi Zack, University of Oregon Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream that someday African Americans would be judged by the content of their characters and not the color(s) of their skins has to the present set the moral standard for attitudes and behavior involving racial difference. For instance, in Buck v. Davis, the U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled inadmissible a psychologist's assessment at sentencing that the defendant would be statistically likely to commit further crimes, because he was black. The Court's ruling was based on the presumption that racial stereotypes cannot be used as evidence in a court of law. Indeed, the application of group statistics to individual cases is not sound prediction and many would consider the Court's ruling here as an astute identification of. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Social Contract Theory for a Diverse World: Beyond Tolerance

2017.03.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ryan Muldoon, Social Contract Theory for a Diverse World: Beyond Tolerance, Routledge, 2016, 131pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.03.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ryan Muldoon, Social Contract Theory for a Diverse World: Beyond Tolerance, Routledge, 2016, 131pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138681361. Reviewed by Michael L. Frazer, University of East Anglia It is now a common platitude that diversity is not to be tolerated as a necessary evil, but to be celebrated as a positive good. It is also a well-worn, if more controversial, claim that universal conceptions of justice are a danger to our much-celebrated diversity. This latter idea is at the heart of everything from the leftist critique of liberalism as racist, sexist, and imperialist to the reactionary defense of folkish communities against rootless cosmopolitanism. Not only much of the political theory of our era, but also much of the actual political conflict, is devoted to the struggle between diverse particularities and universal principles. The public-reason-based account of political liberalism developed by. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Contractarianism

[Revised entry by Ann Cudd and Seena Eftekhari on March 15, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] &quot;Contractarianism&quot; names both a political theory of the legitimacy of political authority and
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[Revised entry by Ann Cudd and Seena Eftekhari on March 15, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] "Contractarianism" names both a political theory of the legitimacy of political authority and a moral theory about the origin or legitimate content of moral norms. The political theory of authority claims that legitimate authority of government must derive from the consent of the governed, where the form and content of this consent derives from the idea of contract or mutual agreement. The moral theory of contractarianism claims that moral norms derive their normative force from the idea of contract or mutual agreement....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Maimonides

[Revised entry by Kenneth Seeskin on March 15, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Moses ben Maimon [known to English speaking audiences as Maimonides and Hebrew speaking as Rambam] (1138 -
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[Revised entry by Kenneth Seeskin on March 15, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Moses ben Maimon [known to English speaking audiences as Maimonides and Hebrew speaking as Rambam] (1138 - 1204) is the greatest Jewish philosopher of the medieval period and is still widely read today. The Mishneh Torah, his 14-volume compendium of Jewish law, established him as the leading rabbinic authority of his time and quite possibly of all time. His philosophic masterpiece, the Guide of the Perplexed, is a sustained treatment of Jewish thought and practice...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Stealing Jobs

Embed from Getty Images One stock talking point is that illegal immigrants are stealing jobs from Americans. This point is then used as part of the justification for “building the wall” and
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Embed from Getty Images One stock talking point is that illegal immigrants are stealing jobs from Americans. This point is then used as part of the justification for “building the wall” and escalating the enforcement of immigration laws. As with any talking point, it is reasonable to ask whether it is true. One approach to this question is to consider what it would mean for immigrants to steal jobs. To facilitate the discussion, I’ll offer an analogy to another type of alleged theft, that of stealing someone’s girlfriend (or boyfriend). While I will change the names to protect the innocent and not innocent, when I was in school Dick was dating Jane.  Jane was at my school and Dick was attending a school in a different state. Jane started spending a lot of time with John, and eventually John was dating Jane. An angry Dick showed up to confront John about “stealing his woman.” Jane’s response that she was not stolen because she was not anyone’s property—she chose who she wanted to be. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Why bother?

Yes, there is every reason to bother. Read the following: “One of the most common expressions in everyday life, and one which is generally used by all classes, is the expression ‘Don’t bother me!’
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Yes, there is every reason to bother. Read the following: “One of the most common expressions in everyday life, and one which is generally used by all classes, is the expression ‘Don’t bother me!’ and the origin of the word bother has so frequently bothered me that I have spent some time in tracing its etymology. I was surprised to discover that, like a number of other words in our language, bother is a corruption of two words, viz., both ears; the original meaning of the word being ‘Do not annoy me at both ears’—id est, don’t deafen me with your noise.” This note appeared under the signature Scio in a popular Manchester journal in 1884. Who enlightened Mr. Scio after he “spent some time in tracing the origin” of the troublesome word, used by all classes? And where did he find such nonsense? By 1884 many dictionaries had been published, including Skeat’s, to say nothing of other works educated people used (Johnson and Webster among others). No one suggested anything like bother = both. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

Can art save us from fundamentalism?

London, rain, and Rothko—each was foreign to the missionary encampment on the Navajo reservation where Jakob grew up, in the 1980s. Back then, he seized every opportunity to share the gospel with
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London, rain, and Rothko—each was foreign to the missionary encampment on the Navajo reservation where Jakob grew up, in the 1980s. Back then, he seized every opportunity to share the gospel with his Native American friends, even as they played endless games of cowboys and Indians in the deserts of Arizona: “The Navajo kids always wanted to be the cowboys, because the cowboys always win, they said.” Into his early twenties, Jakob assumed that he would follow in the footsteps of his Pentecostal parents, attend Bible school, and enter into full-time ministry. He nearly did.  “But then, one day” he tells me, “I came into a room that was dimly lit. The space had the feel of a small chapel. [. . .] Tall dark paintings stretched from floor to ceiling. I sat with them for hours, soaking in the lines and colors, venturing into the empty spaces, and the spaces beyond them… I’d later learn that Mark Rothko said, ‘those who weep before my paintings are having the same religious experience. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy