Wisdom Won from Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

2017.06.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jonathan Lear, Wisdom Won from Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis, Harvard University Press, 2017, 328pp., $39.95
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2017.06.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jonathan Lear, Wisdom Won from Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis, Harvard University Press, 2017, 328pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674967847. Reviewed by Brian O'Connor, University College Dublin Jonathan Lear writes about a diverse range of topics with a steady mix of persuasion and provocation. The book, made up of previously published papers, includes chapters on issues in psychoanalysis, the interpretation of Plato, contemporary literature (J. M. Coetzee, Marilynne Robinson), and one on As You Like It. Among the psychoanalytic parts is a consideration of the significance of Aristotelian moral psychology in framing the objectives of the therapeutic process. (Lear defends himself from the charge of anachronism with brio.) There is also an ingenious reading of Freud's maddening Rat Man case. Lear occasionally illustrates his theoretical claims through notes from his own clinical practice. To. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Austro-Hungarian modernists like <strong>Wittgenstein, Karl Kraus, and Joseph Roth </strong>were anti-utopian and anti-ideological. What were they for? Irony

Austro-Hungarian modernists like Wittgenstein, Karl Kraus, and Joseph Roth were anti-utopian and anti-ideological. What were they for?
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Austro-Hungarian modernists like Wittgenstein, Karl Kraus, and Joseph Roth were anti-utopian and anti-ideological. What were they for? Irony

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

"Having won California, <strong>self-esteem </strong>conquered the world. So here we are, living with the first generation raised entirely on the intoxicating mantra of its own excellence"

&quot;Having won California, self-esteem conquered the world. So here we are, living with the first generation raised entirely on the intoxicating mantra of its own
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"Having won California, self-esteem conquered the world. So here we are, living with the first generation raised entirely on the intoxicating mantra of its own excellence"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Fifty years after the Congress for Cultural Freedom was outed as a <strong>CIA front</strong>, it stands as a reminder that state power can go only so far in setting the intellectual agenda

Fifty years after the Congress for Cultural Freedom was outed as a CIA front, it stands as a reminder that state power can go only so far in setting the intellectual
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Fifty years after the Congress for Cultural Freedom was outed as a CIA front, it stands as a reminder that state power can go only so far in setting the intellectual agenda

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Procreation, Parenthood, and Educational Rights: Ethical and Philosophical Issues

2017.06.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jaime Ahlberg and Michael Cholbi (eds.), Procreation, Parenthood, and Educational Rights: Ethical and Philosophical Issues,
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2017.06.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jaime Ahlberg and Michael Cholbi (eds.), Procreation, Parenthood, and Educational Rights: Ethical and Philosophical Issues, Routledge, 2017, 277pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138206229. Reviewed by David Archard, Queen's University Belfast Do we have rights to create and to rear children? If so, what are their source, nature and scope? In recent years there has been a huge volume of new writing in this area, and the present book contributes a further set of pieces that seek to answer the basic questions stated. The volume considers procreative ethics, what it means to be a parent, and how to balance parental and children's interests in a defensible specification of how children should be brought up and educated. It is a mixed bag with some pieces that argue for distinctive and substantive positions, others that muse on the difficulties in reaching agreement to answers, and others that are on the whole only. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Scientific Realism

[Revised entry by Anjan Chakravartty on June 12, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Debates about scientific realism are closely connected to almost everything else in the philosophy of
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[Revised entry by Anjan Chakravartty on June 12, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Debates about scientific realism are closely connected to almost everything else in the philosophy of science, for they concern the very nature of scientific knowledge. Scientific realism is a positive epistemic attitude toward the content of our best theories and models, recommending belief in both observable and unobservable aspects of the world described by the sciences. This epistemic attitude has important metaphysical and semantic dimensions, and these various commitments are contested by a number of rival epistemologies of science, known...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Philosophical writing </strong>is pedantically precise. It's not much fun and doesn't much influence people. The problems are hard to settle. It&rsquo;s a dirty job, but someone has to do it

Philosophical writing is pedantically precise. It&#39;s not much fun and doesn&#39;t much influence people. The problems are hard to settle. It&amp;rsquo;s a dirty job, but someone has to do
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Philosophical writing is pedantically precise. It's not much fun and doesn't much influence people. The problems are hard to settle. It’s a dirty job, but someone has to do it

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In an 1888 diary entry, <strong>Thomas Hardy </strong>reflected on a church service. His stream-of-consciousness style was a harbinger of modernist techniques to come. We are Hardy's heirs

In an 1888 diary entry, Thomas Hardy reflected on a church service. His stream-of-consciousness style was a harbinger of modernist techniques to come. We are Hardy&#39;s
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In an 1888 diary entry, Thomas Hardy reflected on a church service. His stream-of-consciousness style was a harbinger of modernist techniques to come. We are Hardy's heirs

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What's the relationship among <strong>genes, race, and IQ</strong>? The near-impossibility of a definitive answer has let assertion substitute for evidence

What&#39;s the relationship among genes, race, and IQ? The near-impossibility of a definitive answer has let assertion substitute for
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What's the relationship among genes, race, and IQ? The near-impossibility of a definitive answer has let assertion substitute for evidence

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Locke's Science of Knowledge

2017.06.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew Priselac, Locke&#39;s Science of Knowledge, Routledge, 2017, 240pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138918832. Reviewed by
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2017.06.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew Priselac, Locke's Science of Knowledge, Routledge, 2017, 240pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138918832. Reviewed by Georges Dicker, The College at Brockport, State University of New York This study of Locke's epistemology in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding is an original, ambitious, and complex monograph that also shows command of the relevant recent Locke scholarship. Although Matthew Priselac expounds Locke's epistemology as a whole, especially as presented in Books II and IV of the Essay, he says that his chief concern is Locke's "account of knowledge of the external world" (15; compare 9-11, 52, 60), and indeed his multi-layered book's most striking aspect, though by no means its only theme, is a defense of Locke's position on knowledge of the external world, or what Locke calls "sensitive knowledge." Such a defense faces at least two questions: (1) how can Locke avoid skepticism, given his. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News