Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change?

2014.04.31 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Katrina Hutchinson and Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? Oxford University Press, 2013,
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2014.04.31 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Katrina Hutchinson and Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? Oxford University Press, 2013, 271pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780199325610. Reviewed by Peg O'Connor, Gustavus Adolphus College This is a richly complex book that addresses what many women in philosophy unfortunately and easily can grant: there are some major problems for women (and for underrepresented males) in philosophy. While some of the problems may be caused by men behaving very badly, these are not really the subject of this work. That is not to say that these problems are not serious; they most certainly are. However, cases such as these are written off to the individual men without calling the discipline of philosophy into question. This works plumbs the depth and extent of the systemic and structural problems of philosophy and the often more difficult to identify ways that the discipline excludes,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Part-time Philosophy Instructor Fall 2014 - Winter 2015

Job List:  Americas Name of institution:  Red Deer College
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Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
Red Deer College
Town: 
Red Deer, AB
Country: 
Canada
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

The Moral Relevance of Non-Natural Properties

I've been thinking about the "ethical idlers" objection to non-naturalism recently, especially in light of Matt Bedke's really interesting forthcoming paper “A Menagerie of Duties?: Normative
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I've been thinking about the "ethical idlers" objection to non-naturalism recently, especially in light of Matt Bedke's really interesting forthcoming paper “A Menagerie of Duties?: Normative Judgments are not Beliefs about Non-Natural Properties”.  As Bedke introduces the problem:What things are like non-naturally is not relevant to our normative judgments in the way we would expect them to be if such judgments were beliefs about those sorts of properties. Non-natural properties would belong to a menagerie of curiosities if we could map and catalog them, but our deepest normative convictions do not hang on how they are arranged.Or, as Frank Jackson put it (From Metaphysics to Ethics, p.127):[I]t is hard to see how the further properties [posited by non-naturalists] could be of any ethical significance. Are we supposed to take seriously someone who says, 'I see that this action will kill many and save no-one, but that is not enough to justify my not doing it; what really. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

Chargé/e de cours (40%)

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  Department of Philosophy, University of
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
Department of Philosophy, University of Geneva
Town: 
Geneva
Country: 
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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Postdoc, 50% (three positions, three years each)

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  University of Geneva, Department of
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
University of Geneva, Department of Philosophy
Town: 
Geneva
Country: 
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Michigan & Affirmative Action

The matter of affirmative action once again hit the headlines in the United States with the Supreme Court upholding Michigan’s civil rights amendment, which had been overturned. The amendment
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Michigan State University wordmark (Photo credit: Wikipedia) The matter of affirmative action once again hit the headlines in the United States with the Supreme Court upholding Michigan’s civil rights amendment, which had been overturned. The amendment specifies that: (1) The University of Michigan, Michigan State University, Wayne State University, and any other public college or university, community college, or school district shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting. (2) The state shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting. On the face of it, these two things seem to be exactly what civil rights laws. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

What Killed My Sister?

Why hasn’t natural selection weeded out a genetic propensity for schizophrenia? The answer might have to do with its links to creativity…
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Why hasn’t natural selection weeded out a genetic propensity for schizophrenia? The answer might have to do with its links to creativity… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

On Stefan Zweig

Stefan Zweig killed himself in 1942. Once among the world’s most popular writers, he was no longer so widely read. A revival was soon under way…
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Stefan Zweig killed himself in 1942. Once among the world’s most popular writers, he was no longer so widely read. A revival was soon under way… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

White-Collar World

In the 1950s, America became nation of paper pushers. We still are: status and prestige, emotional games and office politics. Paging C. Wright Mills…
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In the 1950s, America became nation of paper pushers. We still are: status and prestige, emotional games and office politics. Paging C. Wright Mills… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Lewd, the Rude and the Nasty

2014.04.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Pekka Väyrynen, The Lewd, the Rude and the Nasty, Oxford University Press, 2013, 271pp., $49.95 (hbk), ISBN
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2014.04.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Pekka Väyrynen, The Lewd, the Rude and the Nasty, Oxford University Press, 2013, 271pp., $49.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780199314751. Reviewed by Matthew S. Bedke, University of British Columbia Suppose I begin like this: Pekka Väyrynen has written a rich, insightful book. He deftly plumbs the evidence on just how thick terms communicate evaluative content, and he fairly, judiciously comes down in favor of a pragmatic theory. I have just tried to employ some thick terms -- as the tradition would have it, terms that build into their meanings both description and evaluation. 'Deftly', for example, would be an inaccurate description of a clumsy, inept analysis. And in saying it was deft I am not remaining neutral on the quality I'm describing. I am also indicating its positive value. According to Väyrynen's main thesis, however, with those opening expressions I have not yet said the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News