Moral Arguments for the Existence of God

[Revised entry by C. Stephen Evans on June 12, 2014. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by C. Stephen Evans replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous
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[Revised entry by C. Stephen Evans on June 12, 2014. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by C. Stephen Evans replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.]...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

What Pragmatism Was

2014.06.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews F. Thomas Burke, What Pragmatism Was, Indiana University Press, 2013, 233pp., $25.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780253009586. Reviewed by
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2014.06.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews F. Thomas Burke, What Pragmatism Was, Indiana University Press, 2013, 233pp., $25.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780253009586. Reviewed by Robert B. Talisse, Vanderbilt University Charles Peirce introduced the term pragmatism in the early 1870s at The Metaphysical Club. Peirce meant to name the methodological doctrine articulated in what has since come to be known as "the pragmatic maxim." That maxim first appeared in his 1878 essay, "How to Make Our Ideas Clear"; there one finds a standard formulation: "Consider what effects, that might conceivably have practical bearings, we conceive the object of our conception to have. Then, our conception of these effects is the whole of our conception of the object." As is well known, the point of the maxim is to achieve a degree of clearness in thought that goes beyond Cartesian "clear and distinct" ideas. It is less often noticed that... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Stuart Dybek’s short stories

The American short story has long been dominated by small, minimalist tales of disaffection, longing, and boredom. Blame John Updike…
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The American short story has long been dominated by small, minimalist tales of disaffection, longing, and boredom. Blame John Updike… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Goalkeepers

The goalkeeper is a man for any season – crazy person, intellectual, scapegoat, literary hero. No other position attracts such odd and iconoclastic characters…
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The goalkeeper is a man for any season – crazy person, intellectual, scapegoat, literary hero. No other position attracts such odd and iconoclastic characters… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Art and Donna Tartt

The Goldfinch phenomenon. Donna Tartt’s novel is a masterpiece – or a cliché-ridden load of junk. Critics can’t see beyond their preconceptions…
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The Goldfinch phenomenon. Donna Tartt’s novel is a masterpiece – or a cliché-ridden load of junk. Critics can’t see beyond their preconceptions… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Metaphysics and the Tri-Personal God

2014.06.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews William Hasker, Metaphysics and the Tri-Personal God, Oxford University Press, 2013, 269pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2014.06.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews William Hasker, Metaphysics and the Tri-Personal God, Oxford University Press, 2013, 269pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199681518. Reviewed by Keith E. Yandell, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Trinity International University Analytic theology is a comparatively new enterprise in which philosophers and theologians in the analytic tradition provide carefully stated expressions of Christian doctrine and appraise the work of others who do likewise. William Hasker's book appears in the Oxford University Press series on Analytic Theology. The book is divided into three parts. In Part I, Hasker deals with difficult topics as he perceptively discusses pro-Nicene doctrine in the Cappadocians and Augustine, taking the fourth century as the high point of trinitarian doctrine. Part II includes clear discussions of the trinitarian views of contemporary theologians (Karl Barth, Karl Rahner, John Zizioulas, Jürgen Moltmann). . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Data Driven

While the notion of driverless cars is old news in science fiction, Google is working to make that fiction a reality. While I suspect that “Google will kill us all” (trademarked), I hope that Google
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English: Google driverless car operating on a testing path (Photo credit: Wikipedia) While the notion of driverless cars is old news in science fiction, Google is working to make that fiction a reality. While I suspect that “Google will kill us all” (trademarked), I hope that Google will succeed in producing an effective and affordable driverless car. As my friends and associates will attest, 1) I do not like to drive, 2) I have a terrifying lack of navigation skills, and 3) I instantiate Yankee frugality. As such, an affordable self-driving car would be almost just the thing for me. I would even consider going with a car, although my proper and rightful vehicle is a truck (or a dragon). Presumably self-driving trucks will be available soon after the car. While the part of my mind that gets lost is really looking forward to the driverless car, the rest of my mind is a bit concerned about the driverless car. I am not worried that their descendants will kill us all—I already accept that. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

The Atheistic Argument from Apathy

Roughly speaking, I’ve heard the following argument a few times recently: 1. I have thought a lot about religion and God. 2. After careful consideration, I don’t care whether or not God
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Roughly speaking, I’ve heard the following argument a few times recently: 1. I have thought a lot about religion and God. 2. After careful consideration, I don’t care whether or not God exists. 3. If it were remotely likely that God exists, I would care. 4. Therefore, God most likely does not exist. Wondering what…

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News source: The Prosblogion

Rethinking Jewish Philosophy: Beyond Particularism and Universalism

2014.06.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Aaron W. Hughes, Rethinking Jewish Philosophy: Beyond Particularism and Universalism, Oxford University Press, 2014, 170pp.,
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2014.06.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Aaron W. Hughes, Rethinking Jewish Philosophy: Beyond Particularism and Universalism, Oxford University Press, 2014, 170pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199356812. Reviewed by Kenneth Seeskin, Northwestern University Among its other virtues, the book boasts an accurate and descriptive title: its purpose is to argue that the dominant trend in Jewish philosophy has run aground because of its reliance on artificially constructed categories like universal/particular, Jew/non-Jew, and Jerusalem/Athens. In that respect, it is an exercise in what Aaron Hughes calls "Jewish metaphilosophy." He takes issue with the rationalist tendencies that emerged from the nineteenth century movement known as Wissenschaft des Judentums as well as the particularist tendencies that one finds in the work of Franz Rosenzweig. Whatever one thinks of the substance of Hughes' arguments, there is no getting around the fact that he writes with. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Robert Silvers interview

Robert Silvers, renowned as a ruthlessly highbrow editor, starring in a Martin Scorsese film? It’s true…
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Robert Silvers, renowned as a ruthlessly highbrow editor, starring in a Martin Scorsese film? It’s true… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily