Trending Topics and Words in Philosophy Dissertations

What are the hot topics of philosophical dissertations since 2000? Click here to find out which words are most common in these dissertation titles.

What are the hot topics in philosophical dissertations since 2000?  Using the approximately 2,000 dissertation titles (excluding all “Unknown” dissertations) I had collected for other analyses, I separated out each word in a single title and put it into a column with all of the words from other titles.  The combined result was approximately 16,500 individual words (so about 5 words per title), and of those, about 3,400 distinct words.  After removing common and uninteresting words like “the” and “and”, I found how many times each word was used in this collection of dissertation title words. (Note: I did not correct for misspellings.  The words are as I found them in the placement records.)

Which words were the most popular? 

In first, the word “Theory” was used 177 times, meaning that 9% of dissertation titles used this word.  In second, “Philosophy” was used 98 times.  And in third, “Ethics” was used 76 times.  Here are the top 100 results.

Word WordCount
THEORY 177
PHILOSOPHY 98
ETHICS 76
DEFENSE 62
KNOWLEDGE 57
NATURE 56
PHILOSOPHICAL 55
EPISTEMOLOGY 55
METAPHYSICS 53
SCIENCE 53
MIND 46
POLITICAL 45
ETHICAL 45
ACTION 45
EPISTEMIC 43
ACCOUNT 42
PRACTICAL 42
PROBLEM 42
LANGUAGE 42
REASON 42
STUDY 40
APPROACH 40
MORAL 38
VIRTUE 38
SCIENTIFIC 37
MEANING 36
IDENTITY 36
AGENCY 36
EXPLANATION 36
LOGIC 35
TOWARD 35
SOCIAL 34
HUMAN 34
JUSTIFICATION 33
ESSAY 33
WHAT 33
CONTENT 32
THOUGHT 31
REASONS 31
REALISM 30
CRITIQUE 29
GOOD 29
MENTAL 29
NATURAL 29
FOUNDATIONS 28
CRITICAL 28
ESSAYS 28
CAUSATION 28
COGNITIVE 28
TRUTH 28
TIME 27
UNDERSTANDING 27
VALUE 27
SELF 27
RESPONSIBILITY 27
THEORIES 27
SEMANTICS 27
FREEDOM 27
INTERPRETATION 27
PERCEPTION 26
ROLE 26
SKEPTICISM 25
ARISTOTLE 25
NEW 24
LAW 24
PSYCHOLOGY 24
WORLD 24
RATIONALITY 23
NORMATIVITY 23
AUTONOMY 23
CONCEPTS 23
CONCEPTUAL 22
BETWEEN 22
ANALYSIS 22
NORMATIVE 22
REPRESENTATION 22
WITTGENSTEIN 22
STRUCTURE 21
OBJECTIVITY 21
ABSTRACT 21
EXPERIENCE 21
CONTEMPORARY 20
ONTOLOGY 20
LIFE 20
INQUIRY 20
HUME 20
PLATO 19
MATHEMATICS 19
ART 19
BEING 19
COGNITION 19
QUANTUM 19
PERSONAL 18
HEGEL 18
HEIDEGGER 18
JOHN 17
LIBERALISM 17
MAKING 17
MODAL 17
NIETZSCHE 17

Which word pairings/trios were the most popular?

It had been suggested to me that I should look at word clusters, that is, which words appear together often, in the dissertation titles.  These will be more revealing of the topic being discussed in the dissertation.  Once again, I split up each of the words in a dissertation title, but I kept track of which were associated with a specific dissertation.  Then I matched each word with every other word in the same dissertation and then found the most common pairings and trios.  Below are the approximately 180 most common and interesting pairings I found (counts > 3) and the 2 interesting trios (counts > 3) (Note: I have tried to get rid of repeats, but I may have missed some):

Pairs:

Word1 Word2 PairCount
PHILOSOPHY SCIENCE 15
PERSONAL IDENTITY 13
PRACTICAL REASON 13
POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 11
VIRTUE ETHICS 11
MENTAL CAUSATION 10
THEORY TOWARD 10
TOWARD THEORY 10
THEORY DEFENSE 10
THEORY MIND 8
FREEDOM WILL 8
THREE ESSAYS 8
EPISTEMIC JUSTIFICATION 8
NATURAL PHILOSOPHY 7
MATHEMATICS PHILOSOPHY 7
ETHICAL THEORY 7
TRUTH THEORY 7
QUANTUM MECHANICS 7
FREE WILL 7
ANALYSIS PHILOSOPHICAL 6
SEMANTICS LOGIC 6
QUA PROBLEM 6
FOLK PSYCHOLOGY 6
THEORY CONTENT 6
HUME TREATISE 6
QUANTUM THEORY 6
PHILOSOPHICAL THEORY 6
LANGUAGE THOUGHT 6
POLITICAL IDEAL 6
BEING TIME 6
MAKING SENSE 6
MILITARY ETHIC 6
SOCIAL THEORY 6
THOMAS AQUINAS 6
HUMAN NATURE 6
CONTENT THEORY 6
PROBLEM QUA 6
GOOD WHAT 6
ACTION THEORY 5
BUSINESS ETHICS 5
CAUSATION METAPHYSICS 5
CONTENT MENTAL 5
CRITICAL THEORY 5
CRITICAL PHILOSOPHY 5
EARLY PHILOSOPHY 5
ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS 5
EPISTEMOLOGY UNDERSTANDING 5
ETHICAL NATURE 5
ETHICAL ETHICS 5
EXPLANATION THEORY 5
FOUNDATIONS THEORY 5
GOOD THEORY 5
HABERMAS THEORY 5
IDENTITY THEORY 5
INQUIRY INTO 5
INTUITIONS PHILOSOPHICAL 5
MENTAL REPRESENTATION 5
MENTAL CONTENT 5
METAPHYSICS CAUSATION 5
MIND SCIENCE 5
MODAL LOGIC 5
NEW THEORY 5
NORMATIVE THEORY 5
PHILOSOPHICAL INTUITIONS 5
PHILOSOPHY MIND 5
PHILOSOPHY LANGUAGE 5
POLITICAL OBLIGATIONS 5
PRACTICAL REASONS 5
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN 5
SCIENCE MIND 5
SCIENTIFIC REALISM 5
SEMANTICS MEANING 5
THEORY GOOD 5
THEORY EXPLANATION 5
THEORY FOUNDATIONS 5
VIRTUE THEORY 5
WITTGENSTEIN LANGUAGE 5
WITTGENSTEIN TRACTATUS 5
ACCOUNT ACTION 4
BAYESIAN THEORY 4
BEING METAPHYSICS 4
BEING HEIDEGGER 4
BELIEF LANGUAGE 4
CAUSATION PROBLEM 4
CAUSATION THEORY 4
CAUSATION EXPLANATION 4
COLLECTIVE ACTION 4
CONTEXT SCIENCE 4
CONTEXT JUSTIFICATION 4
CRITICAL EXAMINATION 4
DECISION THEORY 4
DEFENSE EPISTEMIC 4
DEMOCRATIC THEORY 4
DIRECT REALISM 4
DIVINE LEIBNIZ 4
EARLY CENTURY 4
EPISTEMIC DEFENSE 4
EPISTEMIC THEORY 4
EPISTEMIC KNOWLEDGE 4
EPISTEMOLOGY JUSTIFICATION 4
EPISTEMOLOGY SCIENTIFIC 4
EPISTEMOLOGY PROBLEM 4
ESSAY PHILOSOPHY 4
ESSAYS PHILOSOPHICAL 4
ETHIC TOWARD 4
EXPLANATION CAUSATION 4
FREE DEFENSE 4
FREEDOM HEGEL 4
GETTING IT 4
GOD SKEPTICISM 4
GRAMMAR MATHEMATICS 4
HEIDEGGER BEING 4
HUMAN ETHICS 4
IDEAL THEORY 4
IDEAL OBLIGATIONS 4
IDENTITY RESPONSIBILITY 4
INTELLIGENT BEHAVIOR 4
INTERPERSONAL SHARED 4
INTERPRETATION THEORY 4
JOHN LOCKE 4
JUSTIFICATION EPISTEMOLOGY 4
JUSTIFICATION CONTEXT 4
KANT REASON 4
LANGUAGE BELIEF 4
LEIBNIZ DIVINE 4
LOGICAL FORM 4
MARTIN HEIDEGGER 4
MATHEMATICS GRAMMAR 4
MEANING THEORY 4
MENTAL PROBLEM 4
METAPHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS 4
METAPHYSICS PHILOSOPHY 4
METAPHYSICS PROBLEM 4
METAPHYSICS BEING 4
MORAL PSYCHOLOGY 4
NATURAL SCIENCE 4
NATURALIZED EPISTEMOLOGY 4
NATURE REASON 4
NEW APPROACH 4
NORMATIVE ETHICS 4
OBLIGATIONS IDEAL 4
PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS 4
PHILOSOPHICAL STUDY 4
PHILOSOPHY ESSAY 4
PHILOSOPHY METAPHYSICS 4
PLATO REPUBLIC 4
POLITICAL AUTHORITY 4
POLITICAL THEORY 4
POSSIBLE WORLDS 4
PRACTICAL AGENCY 4
PRACTICAL THEORY 4
PROBLEM APPROACH 4
PROBLEM METAPHYSICS 4
PROBLEM EPISTEMOLOGY 4
PROBLEM CAUSATION 4
REASON NATURE 4
REASON KANT 4
RESPONSIBILITY IDENTITY 4
RULE LAW 4
SCIENCE CONTEXT 4
SCIENCE SCIENTIFIC 4
SCIENTIFIC EPISTEMOLOGY 4
SCIENTIFIC EXPLANATION 4
SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE 4
SHARED INTERPERSONAL 4
SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY 4
SPATIAL REPRESENTATION 4
SPINOZA THEORY 4
STATE NEUTRALITY 4
STUDY CASE 4
THEORY KNOWLEDGE 4
THEORY INTERPRETATION 4
THEORY TIME 4
THEORY MEANING 4
THEORY SPINOZA 4
THEORY PRACTICAL 4
TIME THEORY 4
TOWARD ETHIC 4
TOWARD UNDERSTANDING 4
VIRTUE EPISTEMOLOGY 4

Trios:

After controlling for dissertation titles that used the same word multiple times in their title (e.g., “Military”), I only found 2 trios that were used more than 3 times in separate dissertations.  But perhaps someone else can find more…

Word1 Word2 Word3 TrioCount
Causation Mental Problem 4
Free Will Defense 4

 

Which words were the Most Unusual/Surprising?

Which words/topics would it be surprising to find in a dissertation title?  Here are some that I found which jumped out at me and which were used more than once:

Word Count of Word
LOVE 9
SPIRIT 5
SHAME 4
SILENCE 4
FAILURE 4
SECESSION 3
SEX 3
MILITARY 3
HOPE 3
DOUBT 3
BUDDHISM 2
FORREST 2
ARMCHAIR 2
COUCH 2
SLAVES 2
SEXUAL 2
GANGSTER 2
ANATOMY 2
UNIVERSE 2
HONEYBEE 2
CONFESSION 2
RESCUE 2
ENTRENCHMENT 2

What do you notice?

Click below to download the full dataset of dissertation titles (approximately 2,000). Please post in the comments below anything interesting that you find in the dataset.  Thanks!

DissertationTitles.csv (122.14 kb)

PhD Placement Report: Updates to Data

The data and charts for the PhD placement report have been significantly updated. See here for the specific details. New and updated data is from Northwestern University, Ohio State University, Brown University, and the University of Toronto.

The data and charts for the PhD placement report have been significantly updated.  See here for the specific details.  New and updated data is from Northwestern University, Ohio State University, Brown University, and the University of Toronto. Most notably, Northwestern University is no longer in the top 3 when it comes to current placement in tenure-track/permanent/tenured positions.  However, it is still in the top 10.  Click here to view the updated report and find out what else has changed...

The Daily Owl 10-25-2013

Provided we have the right type of rigor, we need randomness, mess, adventures, uncertainty, self-discovery, near-traumatic episodes--all these things that make life worth living--compared to the structured, ineffective life of an empty-suit CEO with a pre-set schedule and an alarm clock. (Taleb )

DailyOwl_thumb5_thumb_thumb_thumb_th[2]_thumb_thumb   The Daily Owl says, “Provided we have the right type of rigor, we need randomness, mess, adventures, uncertainty, self-discovery, near-traumatic episodes--all these things that make life worth living--compared to the structured, ineffective life of an empty-suit CEO with a pre-set schedule and an alarm clock.” (Nassim Nicholas Taleb )

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Philosophers Immortalized in . . . Comics?

Learn about the likes and dislikes of Nietsche, what Plato was good at, and who was also known as The Jewish Elvis. Catch some funky dialogue between your now-dead favorite thinkers too!

flat,135x135,075,tIf you’ve ever wanted philosopher trading cards, now you have it (sort of). Dead Philosophers in Heaven creators Matt Russell and Nick Gibb are using their artistry to, ahem, “honor” philosophers (and teach us a little about them) by putting them in dialog and creating posters that summarize some of their important personality traits. For example, you’ll learn that:

  • Nietzsche dislikes socialism, 99.7% of western philosophy, and you
  • Marx’s ambition was to beat Engels at Beeropoly
  • Plato’s secret weapon was his terrible conversational skills
  • Wittgenstein liked boiled cabbage with a side of Saint Augustine

You can also listen to never-before revealed dialogue between dead philosophers about how governments should be structured and a personal interview with Albert Camus. Just a heads up that philosophers tend to be pretty foul-mouthed (something we all knew) but this glimpse into their secret lives will leave you wanting more.

Russell and Gibb have only a handful of posters on individual philosophers but I hope to see more in the future.

Enjoy!

http://www.dead-philosophers.com/

Graduate School Philosophy Placement Records In the US/CA: Prestige Placement Rankings

In this report, we rank PhD programs in philosophy according to how well they place schools based on the prestige of their (1) Terminal MA Philosophy program placements, (2) PhD philosophy program placements, (3) US News National University placements, and (4) US News Liberal Arts placements.

pr_prestige

In this report, we rank PhD programs in philosophy according to how well they place schools based on the prestige of their (1) Terminal MA Philosophy program placements, (2) PhD philosophy program placements, (3) US News National University placements, and (4) US News Liberal Arts placements.

 

Other Reports

pr_phdThe Placement Report for Ph.D. Programs
pr_terminalmaThe Placement Report for Terminal MA Programs
pr_contentialThe Placement Report for Continental Philosophy

The Motivation: Why do this Study?

In my initial work on philosophy placement records, I received a lot of feedback and criticism regarding my ranking of programs by job placement type, that is, by the ratio of students that receive a tenure-track/permanent position upon graduation to all graduating students, and the ratio of students that are currently in a tenure-track/permanent/Tenured position to all graduating students.  As my main goal in that article was to focus on the question, "Will I get a Job?", it seemed appropriate to me to focus simply on that question.

While I do think this sort of ranking is important in its own right (since some students will only/mostly care about getting a stable position, no matter where it is), I do agree that this is not the whole story when it comes to placement.  As such, I have worked on a way to measure the quality of placement (i.e., the rank of the school) as opposed to merely the kind of placement (i.e., tenure-track/permanent, post-doc/researcher, lecturer/temporary).  I do want to present as much of the full picture as I can regarding placement, so these efforts are an attempt to round out and complete the analysis.

The Method : How the Report was Created

I already had all of the placement data that I had collected for the previous article.  However, I needed a way to measure the quality of placement, both initially and currently, for each PhD program.  I found four sources to use for doing this.  The first is the terminal MA programs in philosophy rankings from the Leiter Report.  I found the average rank for each MA program from 2002 onwards, and then matched that rank up with each PhD placement to that school.  Then I found the average overall MA placement rank for each PhD program, weighted the rank by the percentage of students from the PhD program that went there, and then ranked PhD programs in order based on that weighted ranking.  Second, I used the PhD rankings from the Leiter Report to find the overall PhD placement rank using the same method as I did for the MA rankings.  Thus, these two sources can be used to measure the best overall placement into philosophy departments.

Third, I used the 2013 US News National University rankings to find the overall National University placement rank for each PhD program, using the same methods as before.  Fourth,  I used the 2013 US News Liberal Arts College rankings to find the overall Liberal Arts College placement rank for each PhD program, using the same methods as before. Thus, these two sources can be used to measure the best overall placement into universities and colleges in the US from the standpoint of which universities and colleges are currently ranked the best overall.

Each of these four methods provides a different insight into the sort of placement one can expect from a school, and as such, each can be used or not depending on a prospective student's interest.  If he or she wants to work at the best liberal arts college possible but wants to avoid a large university and doesn't care as much about the quality of the philosophy department, then the liberal arts rankings will be the most useful.  If a student wants to be in a great philosophy department, but does not care about the quality of the school overall, then the first two rankings will be most helpful.

(Note: there are close to 1,000 distinct schools mentioned in the placement data, and over 500 schools mentioned in the US News rankings, and sometimes, the names aren't exactly the same, even when it is the same school.  Please be patient with me while I working on normalizing the names so that they are consistent throughout, and as such, properly represented in the dataset. Further, the definition of quality I’m using in this study is a factor of the rankings determined by the sources I note above. Many consider quality to be somewhat of a subjective measure and I’m making no claims about a particular school’s quality all things considered. This is a study based on qualitative data from sources that attempt to assign a quality measure but I acknowledge that an individual’s assessment of a quality program may differ dramatically from the assessment given in those sources.)

The Meat: Which PhD Programs Have the Best Prestige Placement Rankings?

1. Prestige Rankings by Placement into Best MA Philosophy Program Departments

The following lists the rank of each PhD program according to how well it initially placed graduates into the best departments featuring a terminal MA in philosophy.  The columns mean the following things (note: these will have the same meanings for each list).

PhDSchool - The PhD program that is doing the placement

AvgOverallRank (AOR)- The average overall rank of all of the MA schools (PhD schools / National Universities / Liberal Arts colleges) that a graduate was placed at.

RatioOfRankedPlacements (RRP)- The ratio of students placed into these MA schools (PhD schools / National Universities / Liberal Arts colleges) compared with the total number of graduates from that school.

WeightedRank (WR)- The AvgOverallRank / RatioOfRankedPlacements.

PlacementRankScore (PRS) - The ranking of the school based on the WeightedRank (from low to high)

Why is the weighted rank necessary? Because not all schools are ranked, I needed a way to compensate for the ratio of students each school sent to a highly ranked program.  It wouldn't be fair if a school that only sent 1 student to a number 1 program ranked higher than a school that sent 100 students to a number 1 program and 1 student to a number 2 program.  Clearly, the ratio of students going to a ranked school should make a difference in how each PhD program is ranked.

Using the following list as an example, we can see that MIT and Stanford have the same AvgOverallRank. However, MIT has sent more of its students to these #1 schools then Stanford has.  So shouldn't it be ranked higher? I judge that is should. Similarly, the University of California, Berkeley has an AvgOverallRank of 2 while the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor has an AvgOverallRank  of 7.4.  However, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor has sent nearly 10% of its students to highly ranked MA programs while UC, Berkeley has sent only 2% of its graduates.  Imagine that we added 10 more ranked MA programs, and UC, Berkeley had more placements to these schools than Michigan did.  Then its AvgOverallRank would be much lower.  However, since these programs are not currently being counted, it looks as though UC, Berkeley has a better MA placement than Michigan does, when in fact, the reverse may be true. Thus, the weighted rank compensates for the ratio of PhD students being sent from a department and for the lack of rankings for all schools.  A PhD program that places most of its students in moderately high programs should rank more highly than a school with very few students that end up in very highly ranked programs, since the former normally has a better placement record than the latter.  As such, the weighted rank better represents the normal placement of a school.

Now on to the rankings.  In order, the PhD programs that have the best INITIAL placement of students who place into great terminal MA philosophy departments are (1) MIT, (2) Stanford, and (3) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.   Here is the full list of all PhD programs that have initially placed students into great terminal MA philosophy departments:

In order, the PhD programs that have the best CURRENT placement of students who place into great terminal MA philosophy departments are (1) Stanford, (2) MIT, and (3) New York University.   Here is the full list of all PhD programs whose graduates are currently in great terminal MA philosophy departments:

2. Prestige Rankings by Placement into Best PhD Philosophy Program Departments

In order, the PhD programs that have the best INITIAL placement of students who place into great terminal PhD philosophy departments are (1) New York University, (2) MIT, and (3) Princeton University.   Here is the full list of all PhD programs that have initially placed students into great PhD philosophy departments:

In order, the PhD programs that have the best CURRENT placement of students who place into great PhD philosophy departments are(1) New York University, (2) MIT, and (3) Princeton University.   Here is the full list of all PhD programs whose graduates are currently in great PhD philosophy departments:

3.  Prestige Rankings by Placement into Best National Universities

In order, the PhD programs that have the best INITIAL placement of students who place into great National Universities are (1) Carnegie Mellon University, (2) MIT, and (3) University of California, Berkeley.   Here is the full list of all PhD programs that have initially placed students into great National Universities departments:

In order, the PhD programs that have the best CURRENT placement of students who place into great National Universities are (1) Carnegie Mellon University, (2) MIT, and (3) New York University.   Here is the full list of all PhD programs whose graduates are currently in great National Universities departments:

4.  Prestige Rankings by Placement into Best Liberal Arts Colleges

In order, the PhD programs that have the best INITIAL placement of students who place into great Liberal Arts Colleges are (1) New York University, (2) University of Pennsylvania, and (3) University of California, Riverside.   Here is the full list of all PhD programs that have initially placed students into great Liberal Arts Colleges:

In order, the PhD programs that have the best CURRENT placement of students who place into great Liberal Arts Colleges are(1) Washington University, St. Louis, (2) Harvard University, and (3) University of Chicago.   Here is the full list of all PhD programs whose graduates are currently in great Liberal Arts Colleges (Note: Washington University's ranking is based on one student placing very highly.  After the school names have been normalized, I expect this rank to drop significantly.  However, to be consistent, I am leaving it as is for now):

Moving Forward: What Next?

There are lots of rankings here, and I suspect that each ranking will be more appropriate for some students compared with others.  Think about what matters most to you.  At what sort of school do you want to end up teaching initially?  At what sort of school do you want to end up teaching eventually?  A one-size-fits-all ranking system does not make sense for a diverse group of students with different goals and desires, so use these rankings along with other rankings (e.g., faculty rankings, job type placements) and other considerations (e.g., location, funding) you have to make your own ranking of schools, a ranking that suits you best.

Feel free to send me comments and suggestions on this report.

Thanks,

Andy Carson
pn_logo16x16Philosophy News

The Daily Owl 10-23-2013

We are generally the better persuaded by the reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others. (Pascal)

DailyOwl_thumb5_thumb_thumb_thumb_th[2]_thumb_thumb   The Daily Owl says, “We are generally the better persuaded by the reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others.” (Blaise Pascal)

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Graduate School in Philosophy in the US: Terminal MA Programs In Philosophy

An analysis of placements records from MA programs in philosophy in an effort to provide some insight into the assertions made by various programs. The report attempts to address questions like, which MA programs are the best at getting students into good PhD programs and how many MA students go on to study philosophy.

pr_terminalma

We offer this analysis of placements from MA programs in philosophy in an effort to place some data behind the assertions made by various programs and to provide some guidance (and comfort) to students pursuing an MA.  Which MA programs are the best at getting students into good PhD programs?  Do most MA students go on to study philosophy?  What do students do after their MA if they do not go into academic philosophy? This is what we wanted to find out.

 

Other Reports

pr_phdThe Placement Report for Ph.D. Programs
pr_prestigeThe Placement Report Based on School Prestige
pr_contential[5]The Placement Report for Continental Philosophy

The Motivation: Why do this Study?

When making a decision to pursue a career in philosophy, I decided to pursue a terminal MA first (Northern Illinois University, 2012).  I had a great experience, and had I chosen to apply to PhD programs, I know I would have been well prepared.

MA graduate students often discussed in our TA office how our program compared with other MA programs. We discussed the collegial atmosphere in our program, which was very supportive and friendly, and compared it with what we had heard about the collegial atmospheres at other MA programs.  We noted further similarities and differences between our program and others regarding requirements and faculty expertise.  We also discussed placements from various programs, debating whose program truly was the best, and wondering where we would end up in academia.  As I began to consider not entering into academia, I wondered what I would be able to do in the private sector.  What skills did having an MA in philosophy give me?  What sorts of jobs or other academic pursuits would be a natural fit for me?

The Mark:  The Goals of an MA Program in Philosophy

There seem to be two broad goals of an MA program.  Programs emphasized these goals to varying degrees

1. An MA program in philosophy ought to prepare students for doctoral study in philosophy; it ought to prepare students to teach philosophy at the college or university level.

I entered my MA program with the goal of attending a PhD program afterwards.  As I did not have a BA in philosophy (I had discovered philosophy late in my undergraduate studies), my professors encouraged me to attend an MA program first in order to boost my chances of getting into a well-ranked PhD program.  My fellow students were of similar backgrounds; either they did not have a BA in philosophy, or they had come from a small and lesser-known school.  My fellow students are bright and capable and just needed a bit more background and more established credentials before applying to PhD programs. After completing the program, most of my fellow graduate students applied for doctoral study in philosophy and they are now at some of the best programs in the country. MA programs are great places to prepare for doctoral study in philosophy, particularly for students whose philosophical background is not yet impressive enough to attract the best schools, but will be after completing the program.  Furthermore, an MA gives a student the ability to teach at the college and university level, even if he or she does not pursue a PhD.  Whether as a full time faculty member at a community college or a part time lecturer at a university, the MA opens the door to teaching philosophy professionally.

2. An MA program ought to provide valuable skills to those who do NOT pursue academic philosophy; a student should graduate with strong writing, reasoning, and analytical skills that will be useful in other academic disciplines or in other career paths.

It is generally expected that those entering a PhD program in philosophy will continue on to professional philosophy in some way.  This, however, is not necessarily the case at the MA level. After completing the MA, students should be able to pursue philosophy for its own sake and for the sake of acquiring useful skills that can be applied in other disciplines.  I know that the writing, reasoning, and analytical skills I learned and honed at NIU have been very helpful to me in my work as a data scientist, programmer, and DBA.  Even though I did not go on to the PhD, I found that my MA program prepared me well for working outside the discipline.  As one of my former professors put it, "the intellectual training that one gets in a master's program in philosophy is rewarding and valuable no matter which career path one subsequently decides to take."  As an added bonus, the MA is only a two-year commitment, as opposed to a 5-7 year commitment at the PhD level.  As such, MA students can study philosophy at a high level without the pressure of a long-term commitment, and earn these valuable skills relatively quickly.

The MA program at Brandeis University sums up these two goals very well on its department website: "The Master's Degree Program in Philosophy has two main goals: (1) to offer students the opportunity to learn more about philosophy and (2) to enable students to apply to top-ranked doctoral programs in philosophy or in other fields.  The M.A. in Philosophy will enhance students' qualifications if they plan to pursue a doctoral program in philosophy; this can be especially useful if they seek to enter graduate school without first having obtained an undergraduate major in philosophy. An M.A. in Philosophy is also valuable for students seeking to pursue other career paths. A demonstrated capacity for rigor in reasoning and analysis, as well as enhanced communication and writing skills will strengthen the applications of those pursuing careers in fields such as business, economics, law, medicine, publishing, and divinity."

The MA program at Northern Illinois University also characterizes its mission in a similar way on its website: "Those who complete this program are extremely well prepared for advanced work in leading doctoral programs in philosophy or for teaching philosophy at the community college level. The Master of Arts degree also provides excellent preparation for further graduate study in fields other than philosophy."

How are MA programs doing in meeting these two goals?

The Method: How I Gathered and Analyzed the Data

I gathered all of the placement data from all of the MA programs listed here on The Leiter Report. Based on the wording and structure of the paragraph, I have assigned the following ranks to the MA programs for 2011 (understand that rankings like these are subject to some interpretation and I expect others may evaluate the data differently):

MA_Schools 2011_Leiter_Rank
Tufts University 1
Arizona State University 2
Brandeis University 2
Georgia State University 2
Northern Illinois University 2
University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee 2
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University 2
San Francisco State University 8
University of Houston 8
University of Missouri, St. Louis 8
California State University, Los Angeles 11
Colorado State University 11
Ohio University 11
Texas A&M University (MA) 11
Texas Tech University 11
Western Michigan University 11

 

Using past Leiter Reports and averaging the rankings for each school across time since 2002, I found the average of rankings, along with the overall average ranking, for each school*.  Here are the full results:

*Notes:

Brandeis University has a very new MA program and has only been ranked since 2009.  As such, it does not yet have as extensive a placement record as other programs that have been around for much longer. Also, Arizona State University and Ohio University have only been ranked once (2011), even though their MA programs have been around since before 2000. Consequently, I have inferred a ranking (in comparison to the other MA schools) for both schools for each of the years that it had an MA program but was unranked.  Similarly, I have inferred rankings for California State University, Los Angeles prior to 2006, when it was first mentioned in the Leiter Report.

Tufts University - Their placement dataset does not contain anyone who did not apply for or who was not received into a PhD program. I had to infer the number of students for each year.  Very likely, some students are missing from this dataset that did not apply to PhD programs or who did not receive a PhD offer. If this is the case, Tufts' placement record will look much more favorable than it actually is. I will look for more data to determine if there are any students missing from the data set and update as soon as I can.

San Francisco State University - The placement dataset was not in a very usable format for my purposes. The schools that students had been accepted into were aggregated into a list, so it was impossible to tell how many students were enrolled in PhD programs, and where they were enrolled.  As such, it is not represented in the data, and I cannot make any comment on it's placement effectiveness.  I hope to gather data about this program soon.

University of Missouri, St. Louis - Only the dataset from 2010 through 2013 was included in the analysis.  Before 2010, the dataset was aggregated into lists, so it was impossible to tell how many students were enrolled in PhD programs, and where they were enrolled.  As such, I cannot comment on its placement effectiveness before 2010.  I hope to gather more data about this program soon.

Ohio University - Only the 2013 dataset was available.  I have no idea how this school placed students prior to 2013, so I cannot comment on its placement effectiveness before 2013. I hope to gather more data about this program soon.

Western Michigan University - The placement dataset was in a very confusing format.  I had to make a lot of inferences regarding where a student was enrolled in a PhD program, and there are probably students that attended that were not represented in the placement dataset.  What I have is my best effort to make sense of what was offered.  I will keep looking for better data.

Texas A&M University - This school has a PhD program in addition to its MA program.  I only used the MA placement records in evaluating the school's effectiveness in placement.

Finally, many programs included a list of schools for each year into which students had also been accepted.  This is often done for legitimate reasons (e.g., to maintain student anonymity, to avoid an unhealthy competitive atmosphere among students within a program).  I did not include these in any way into the rankings or analysis since I cannot tell which students are responsible for these schools (e.g., one student could be responsible for all of the well ranked acceptances, and as such, would be misrepresenting the school's overall placement).

I encountered other challenges which are noted here.

The Data

Gathering all of the placement data I could find from the previously mentioned schools, I created a dataset with the following columns:

Column

Description

Year The year a student graduated from the MA program
MA School The name of the school from which a student graduated
Thesis/Writing Sample The thesis or writing sample associated with the student.  If none was given, then a value of "Unknown" was assigned
Primary Area of Study A student's primary area of study, as given by the school, or as inferred from the thesis/writing sample title.  These values are "Aesthetics", "Continental Philosophy", "Epistemology", "Ethics", "History of Philosophy", "Metaphysics", "Philosophy of Language", "Philosophy of Logic", "Philosophy of Mathematics", "Philosophy of Mind", "Philosophy of Science", "Social and Political Philosophy", and "Unknown"
Applied to Philosophy PhD Programs Whether or not the student applied to philosophy PhD programs.  Values are "Yes", "No", and "Unknown"
Job or Schooling after MA The type of job or schooling a student pursued after receiving his or her MA in philosophy
Enrolled Philosophy PhD Program/First Listed Acceptance The PhD program (school) that a student was enrolled at.  When it was unclear which school a student enrolled at (or if he or she had enrolled at all), I selected the first school listed as an acceptance into the program.  Values are the school names
History and Philosophy of Science Some students enrolled in a History and Philosophy of Science (HPS) PhD.  I wanted to separate this out from other PhD philosophy programs.  Values are the school names
Law School Quite a few students attend law school after their MA, so I made this an additional column.  Values are the school names
Other Academic Programs Quite a few students enter into other academic (master's or doctoral) programs after their MA, so I made this an additional column.  Values are the school names
Type of Other Academic Program The type of institution a teacher is teaching at: high school, community college, four year college, and university
Teaching Many students go straight into teaching at the college or high school level, so this is an additional column.  Values are any information about the teaching position
Type of Teaching Institution The type of institution a teacher is teaching at: high school, community college, four year college, and university
Outside of Academia or Teaching Many students go outside of academia or teaching after their MA, so this is an additional column.  Values are any information about the professional pursuit outside of academia or teaching
Fully Funded Some schools explicitly noted whether an acceptance was fully funded or not.  I added this as an additional column.  Values include "NA" (for non academic positions), "No", "Yes", "Yes (Assumed)" (no information given about the funding, but in a PhD philosophy program), and "Unknown" (the status of the student cannot be inferred).  However, the data was not explicit and complete enough to do any useful analysis on this data
2011 Leiter Rank The inferred Leiter ranking of the MA program from 2011 (see above)
Overall Leiter Rank The inferred overall Leiter ranking for schools since 2002.  Found by averaging the rank of each school for each year it was evaluated and ranked

The Meat: Trends, Observations, and Conclusions

Since 2000, there have been over 1,000 students that have graduated from terminal MA programs in philosophy.  Here is my analysis column by column...

MA School

The distribution of records by MA school that I have gathered, post-2000.  Considering that several of the programs are new and/or are missing data, this should not be taken as showing the size of each school's student output compared to other schools over the past 13 years.  This merely shows the distribution of students in the data set, that is, in all of the data immediately and publicly available.

 

Primary Area Of Study

Most students submit as a writing sample or do a thesis related to ethics (15%), followed by metaphysics (11%), social and political philosophy (7%), epistemology (7%), and history of philosophy (7%) (Note: 36% of students have an "Unknown" primary area of study).

 

Has this changed over time?  It is difficult to say when each subfield is considered by itself, especially as the number of "Unknown" primary areas of study has increased over time.

When grouped together by similar subfields, each group seems to be decreasing, except for Science and Math subfields which appears to be steady, while the "Unknown" category increases.  If we compensate for this, then we can infer that Science and Math subfields are increasing while the other subfields are maintaining/decreasing slightly.

 

Applied to Philosophy PhD Programs

About 30% of students who receive an MA in philosophy from one of these programs DO NOT apply to a PhD program in philosophy; 66% do apply, and 6% are unknown.

 

Has this distribution changed over time? Slightly. The ratio of students that do apply for PhD programs seems to be increasing, while those that do not seems to be decreasing ("Unknowns" are very slightly increasing). So, overall, it seems that more and more students from MA programs are applying to PhD programs in philosophy as time goes on.

 

Breaking this down by schools, and ranking schools by the ratio of students that do apply for a PhD program in philosophy (i.e., "Yes"), we see that overall, the schools whose students on average most apply to PhD programs in philosophy since 2000 are (1) Tufts University (100%) (Note: see my disclaimer about Tufts up above), (2) Western Michigan University (97%), and (3) California State University, Los Angeles (79%).  Here is the full list:

 

Since 2011, the schools with the highest ratio of MA students that apply for PhD programs in philosophy have been (1) Tufts University (100%) (Note: see my disclaimer about Tufts up above), (2) Western Michigan University (100%), and (3) Texas A&M University (90%).  Here is the full list:

 

What does this mean?  For students that are very intent on studying philosophy at the PhD level, attending a school where the great majority of MA students apply to PhD programs (e.g., Tufts) may be the best environment for them to learn in.  However, for students that simply want to study philosophy and have no intention of pursuing a PhD in philosophy, a program where fewer students apply (e.g., University of Missouri, St. Louis) may provide the best learning environment for them. 

Job or Schooling after MA

What do students do after receiving their MA in philosophy? 

  • Over half of them do enroll in a PhD program in philosophy
  • 20% have no further information about their placement
  • Approximately 8% take on additional schooling in a different academic discipline
  • 6% leave academia and teaching
  • 5% go straight into teaching (at the high school, community college, college, and university levels)
  • 5% attend law school
  • 1% explicitly attend a History and Philosophy of Science program (note: this is probably higher than reported since many programs do not explicitly state the kind of program a student is going into)

Thus, at least 61% of graduating MA students remain involved in professional academic philosophy or teaching in some way.  At least 74% remain involved in academia in some way.  However, at least 24% of students do not go on to attend a PhD program in Philosophy or the History and Philosophy of Science.

 

 

Has this distribution changed over time?  It does not appear to have changed significantly.  When there is a sharp rise or fall in the data, it seems due to the number of "Unknown" placement rising and falling sharply, and thus, affecting the overall distribution.  So at least for now, it appears this distribution is fairly stable.

 

Enrolled Philosophy PhD Program/First Listed Acceptance

Now for the more controversial analyses.  First, which schools have accepted the most MA graduates? There are about 500 MA graduates from these schools that have enrolled in/been accepted into philosophy PhD programs since 2000. In order of ratio of most MA students accepted: (1) Ohio State University (3.5%), (2) University of California, San Diego (3.3%), and University of California, Riverside (2.7%). Here is the full list (of schools where the ratio is greater than or equal to 0.01):

Of those students who have applied, which schools have sent the most students to a PhD program in philosophy?  Without considering the prestige of the school, I provide three columns below.  The first contains a ratio of all students who enrolled in a program compared to all students who applied or whose application status was unknown.  Thus, these numbers will, for the most part, underestimate the enrollment rate of students that have applied.  The second only compares the number of students that enrolled with the number of students that I am sure applied (leaving the unknowns out of the count).  Thus, these numbers will, for the most part, overestimate the enrollment rate of students that have applied.  The third averages these two values, and is (I hope), closest to the true ratio of students who enrolled to students who applied. (Note: for programs that distinguished students that applied from students that did not, these ratios stay the same.)  In order of estimated rank, the schools with the highest enrollment/applied ratio are (1) Tufts University (100%) (Note: see my disclaimer about Tufts up above), (2) Texas Tech University (95%), and (3) University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (91%).  Here are the full results below:

Averaging out the average ratios, we can determine that approximately 85% of MA graduates that apply for PhD programs in philosophy are accepted into one.

Which MA programs send students to the most highly ranked (Leiter Report ranking) schools?  That is, which MA program has the overall highest average placement rank as determined by PhD faculty ranking?  I found the average English world faculty rank for each PhD program since 2002 and matched it up with the school that each MA student attended.  Then, I found the weighted faculty rank of each MA program's placement by multiplying the average faculty rank of each PhD school by the ratio of MA students that went there for a particular MA program, which I then added for each MA program (e.g., if 50% of an MA program's students went to a number 10 school and 50% went to a number 15 school, then the MA program's faculty rank of PhD placement would be 0.5 * 10 + 0.5 *15 = 12.5).  (Note: when a school was unranked in the world category, I inferred rankings using its average mean since 2002.  When a school was unranked and had never been evaluated, I ranked it after all schools that had been evaluated and ranked at some point. There were 26 such unranked and unevaluated schools that students attended.)

In order of the average weighted English world faculty rank of a PhD program since 2002 that the MA programs place their students into: (1) Tufts University (23.4), (2) Brandeis University (41.5), and (3) Northern Illinois University (41.9).  In other words, the average MA student from Tufts that enrolls in a PhD program in philosophy attends a school with a English world ranking of 23; for Brandeis, 42; for NIU, 42.  Here are the full results:

History and Philosophy of Science

There are not enough data to do any useful analysis of History and Philosophy of Science placements.  However, the programs that students attended that were listed explicitly as being HPS programs were at Arizona State University, Cambridge University, Indiana University (Bloomington), and the University of Pittsburgh.  This is not an exhaustive list of all HPS programs in the country, and MA students probably are in attendance at HPS programs at other schools, though these other school placements were not explicitly mentioned as HPS programs.

Law School

Where do MA graduates go to law school? I counted 34 distinct schools that students attended, and the distribution was fairly evenly distributed.  However, the following schools had more than one MA graduate attend: Catholic University of America, Law school; New York University, Law School; University of California, Berkeley Law School; University of California, Hastings Law School; University of Colorado, Law School; University of Texas, Austin Law School; and University of Virginia, Law School.

Other Academic Programs

What other academic programs do MA graduates pursue? Here is a list of the various doctoral and master's programs that students attended following their MA in philosophy:

Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought (ASPECT)
Anthropology
Architecture
Biology
Cell and Molecular Medicine
Classics
Cognitive Anthropology
Cognitive Psychology
Counseling Psychology
Diplomacy
Economics
Education
Educational Policy
Educational Psychology
English
Fine Arts
Health Care Ethics
History
International Relations
Library Science
Mathematics
Medicine
Modern Thought and Literature
Near Eastern Studies
Neuroscience
Pharmacy School
Physics
Planning Governance and Globalization
Political Science
Psychology
Public Administration
Public Policy
Religion
Rhetoric and Politics
History of Science & Technology
Science, Technology, and Society (STS)
Social Policy
Social Science
Social Work
Sociology
Storytelling
Theology
Urban Studies
Veterinary Medicine
Women's and Gender Studies

Thus, it appears that an MA in philosophy can be a prelude to virtually any other academic discipline.  However, students leaving academic philosophy tend more towards the social sciences than any other discipline. The most popular choice among these is Psychology (10%).  Here are some other top choices for academic disciplines following an MA in philosophy:

Teaching

At what type of institutions do MA graduates teach?

  • 35% of MA graduates that go into teaching end up at a university
  • 28% go to a community college
  • 26% teach high school
  • 11% teach at a four-year college

Most of the positions at the community college, four-year college, and university level appear to be temporary/lecturer/contract positions, although there are a few exceptions.

 

Outside of Academia or Teaching

What do MA graduates do who do not go into another academic program and who do not go into teaching?  Here is a list of some broad categories that I saw:

Account Management
Administrative Services
Advertising
Business
Clinical Psychology
Criminal Defense
Editing
Financial Aid Advising
Health Care Work
Human Resources
Human Rights Advocacy
Insurance
Judicial Clerk
Law Clerk
Law Practice
Library Specialist
Management
Military
Musician
Non Profit Research
Pharmaceutical Sales
Private Sector (Unspecified)
Public Sector (Unspecified)
Publishing
Securities
Software Consulting
Think Tank Research

Thus, MA graduates enter into a wide range of careers following their degree in philosophy.

Moving Forward: What Next?

Placement records are important, and increasingly so as the job market in academic philosophy becomes more and more competitive and students become more concerned about getting a job after they graduate.  Schools can offer better guidance to prospective students by keeping their placement records neat, complete, and organized in an easily-readable, understandable, and flexible format (see here for my recommendations).  If schools do this, then students can quickly and painlessly compare how different schools rank in their placement, further helping them to make the right decision for themselves as they consider a career in academic philosophy.  And if they choose not to go on into academic philosophy, placement records can still provide a valuable resource for students as they consider alternative academic and career paths.

Two final thoughts.  First, if you believe I have grossly misrepresented your school and would like me to correct it, please send me a .csv file, using the same columns and meanings that I have given up above, with all of the corrected information. I will update this article as often as necessary to keep the data current, correct, and fair. Second, if you know any students in or currently considering graduate school in philosophy, please send them a link to this article. I know I would have benefited greatly from an article like this when I was weighing my decision to continue pursuing academic philosophy, and I am sure they will too.

Andy Carson
swoosh_64x52Philosophy News

How Long Is Placement Data Useful?

How long is placement data good for? How far back should students look to gain a sense of a school's placement record? Answer our survey and let us know what you think.

Schools make placement records publicly available for many years after a student has graduated.  In my research, I have seen information about past graduates going back as far as 1920!  However, such information will hardly be useful to any prospective students wanting to get a sense for how a school is currently placing students.  But there is a definite tension here. 

 If we include too much placement data into our dataset, then we will have a hard time seeing new developments and trends in a school's placement.  For example, a PhD program may have hired the best faculty available (or it may have lost great faculty) in the past 5 years, and so its placement record should be really great (or really decline) from those years forward.  However, if we include placement data from 10 to 15 years ago, the school's record will look worse (or a lot better) than what is actually relevant for that prospective student.

On the other hand, it takes time for students to settle into a long term position.  The results of an initial placement are immediate, though to see a good representation of a school's immediate placement, several years will be required at least to get a good sample.  Current placements are not immediate, and sometimes a school's current placement record will not really show fruit for perhaps 5 to 7 years after a student has graduated (after doing post-docs and gaining teaching experience through temporary positions).

What is the right balance?  In general, how long is a school's placement data relevant and useful for prospective students?  Let us know what you think by selecting the answer you most agree with.  Thanks!

How long is placement data good for? That is, for how many years is a school's placement record relevant to a prospective student?






Show Results

 

Beyond Logic: Why Do We Disagree?

A recent paper by Helen de Cruz talks about why two educated people who are exposed to the same evidence disagree on the conclusion of an argument. The reasons aren't all that simple.

Two people look at the same arguments. The arguments are valid, the evidence that supports the premises are available to both people, and they both have the requisite training and intellectual skill to understand the subtleties of the domain. Why do they disagree? Differences in how people position themselves relative to arguments affect not only academic discourse but challenge dialogue in much more pedestrian discussions as well. It might be handy if the irresistible force of logic was much more irresistible than it appears to be. But as anyone who ever has engaged in any kind of a disagreement knows, there is much more at play psychologically and epistemically in how arguments are conducted than yielding to the pure logic of an argument.

While focused mainly on religious disagreement, I thought a recent paper  by Helen de Cruz (really just a collection of her thoughts on the subject) gets at some ideas that are critical ideas that affect discourse academic and otherwise. Humans aren’t Turing machines. Background beliefs, intuition, emotion, even physiology all play a role in how we think about evidence and the dynamics of argumentation. Thankfully, she gives some taxonomic help too by providing terms one can use to categorize various responses to these dynamics

As someone who is interesting in finding some unification across epistemic theories, I’m pleased to see that some of her ideas align with the work Robert McKim is doing.

“There seems to be an easy escape: one common response, both by steadfasters and conciliationists has been that we need not revise our beliefs in complex messy cases if we have reason to believe that we have access to some sort of insight that our epistemic peer lacks.”

You can read the article here

Graduate School Philosophy Placement: Welcome

Welcome to the main page for Philosophy News' Graduate School Philosophy Placement Report. This homepage will provide a more ordered presentation of our work and easier navigation.

Welcome to the main page for Philosophy News'  Graduate School Philosophy Placement Report.  This homepage will provide a more ordered presentation of our work and easier navigation.

Articles:

PhD Level

The Placement Report for Analytic Ph.D. Programs

A report on job placement trends in philosophy since 2000 for Analytic PhD programs.  We also look at trends in areas of specialty and the gender of graduate students since 2000.

The Placement Report for Continental Ph.D. Programs

A report on job placement trends in philosophy since 2000 for Continental PhD programs.  We also look at trends in areas of specialty and the gender of graduate students since 2000. A comparison of the Analytic vs. Continental job markets is also included.

Graduate School Philosophy Placement: The Leiter Report

An analysis of how The Leiter Report’s faculty rankings correlate with tenure-track/permanent/tenured placement rankings for Analytic PhD programs.

The Placement Report Based on School Prestige

A report on “prestige” placement trends for Analytic PhD programs since 2000.  We use the Analytic MA and PhD program rankings from The Leiter Report, as well as the US News National University and Liberal Arts College rankings to rank Analytic PhD philosophy programs by the quality of placement their students have on average.

Trending Topics and Words in Philosophy Dissertations

A little analysis on common words in Analytic philosophy dissertations since 2000.  Which words are popular and unusual?  Find out here.

 

MA Level

The Placement Report for Terminal Analytic MA Programs

A report on job and program placement trends in philosophy since 2000 for terminal MA Analytic programs in philosophy.   Which MA programs are the best at getting students into good PhD programs?  Do most MA students go on to study philosophy?  What do students do after their MA if they do not go into academic philosophy?  Click here to find out.

 

Surveys:

How Long Is Placement Data Useful?

How long is placement data useful for current and future graduate students?  Take our survey to let us know what you think.

What Type of Initial Job Placement Position is Most Valuable?

Is a tenure-track position better than a post-doctoral position?  Is a temporary lecturing position at a great school preferred to a tenure-track position at a poor school? Take our survey to let us know what you think.

 

Interviews:

Philosophy as a Career: Think Long and Hard About Thinking Long and Hard

Studying philosophy can train your mind, help you reason, and almost certainly enrich your life. But what can you do with a degree? Hear from three philosophy majors who now work in other fields on the value of their degree, the pitfalls in pursuing full-time work in philosophy, and some recommendations on how to navigate the often muddy career waters for philosophers.

A Conversation with Dr. Sandy Goldberg on Getting a Job In Philosophy

In this engaging and informative podcast, we talk with Dr. Sandy Goldberg, chairman of the philosophy department at Northwestern University. The catalyst for our conversation was the Philosophy News placement reports and in this interview, we talk with Dr. Goldberg about how his university prepares students for the job market. We also talk about where philosophy as a discipline might be headed, and what the job market may look like in the future.

 

Other:

How Were These Reports Made?

Click above to find out about how all of the data used in the above reports was and is being gathered.

Further Resources, Articles, and Files

Looking for more resources?  Want to see what other people have said about the above reports?  Want to send us an updated file of your school’s placement records?  Click above to find all of these and more.

Updates to the Report

Click here to find out what data has been recently updated and how the reports have changed since you last visited Philosophy News.

 

Author's Notes:

Given the immense amount of feedback and critique, please be patient with me as I work on updating this article.  My goal is to let the data speak for itself, without bias, prejudice, favoritism, or deception.  I aim to be transparent about all of my methods and where the data comes from.

My requests to you, the philosophical community:

If you have comments or feedback, please post them at the end of the article or send them to me directly.  And if you believe my data is mistaken or if your school's data has been significantly updated recently, please send me the appropriate and complete data for your school, so that I can update the data.

If your school is not listed in the Leiter Report, and you believe your placement record matches or exceeds those that are listed, please send me your data and I'll add you to the list.

Encourage those who control your school's placement data to post it fully, completely, and truthfully on the web in a form similar to what I have outlined here, for the sake of all current and future graduate philosophy students.

 

Thanks,

-Andy Carson

Philosophy News