Émilie du Châtelet

[Revised entry by Karen Detlefsen on June 13, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Emilie le Tonnelier de Breteuil, marquise Du Chatelet-Lomont - or simply Emilie Du Chatelet -
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[Revised entry by Karen Detlefsen on June 13, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Emilie le Tonnelier de Breteuil, marquise Du Chatelet-Lomont - or simply Emilie Du Chatelet - was born in Paris on 17 December 1706 to baron Louis Nicholas le Tonnelier de Breteuil and Gabrielle Anne de Froullay, Baronne de Breteuil. She married Marquis Florent-Claude de Chatelet-Lomont in 1725. Together they had three children, a daughter and two sons...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Aquinas and the Nicomachean Ethics

2014.06.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Tobias Hoffmann, Jörn Müller, and Matthias Perkams (eds.), Aquinas and the Nicomachean Ethics, Cambridge University Press, 2013,
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2014.06.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Tobias Hoffmann, Jörn Müller, and Matthias Perkams (eds.), Aquinas and the Nicomachean Ethics, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 275pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107002678. Reviewed by Andrew Pinsent, University of Oxford The choice of topic and the excellence of the contributors promise a great deal from this edited volume. The Nicomachean Ethics (EN) has been described as the 'canonical text' of the dominant tradition of virtue ethics, and much of what is published today makes extensive references to the work of Aristotle either as a foundation or a foil.[1] With a parallel resurgence of interest in the vast and influential works of Thomas Aquinas, the rationale is clear for a new examination of how Aquinas interpreted and adapted the work of Aristotle, especially in regard to the virtues and human action. The group assembled here includes some outstanding scholars who write with commendable clarity. As a. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Malthus among the doomsters

Hated by Coleridge, Byron, and Carlyle: Thomas Malthus, that “mischievous reptile,” was expert at making enemies of the Romantic poets…
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Hated by Coleridge, Byron, and Carlyle: Thomas Malthus, that “mischievous reptile,” was expert at making enemies of the Romantic poets… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Stealing cultures

Sir Walter Scott popularized the clan tartan; Madonna the kaffiyeh. When is it OK to steal from other cultures?…
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Sir Walter Scott popularized the clan tartan; Madonna the kaffiyeh. When is it OK to steal from other cultures?… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Reading: The Struggle

When what qualifies as iron will is not checking your email for an hour, there is little hope of finding the focus to read a long and complex book…
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When what qualifies as iron will is not checking your email for an hour, there is little hope of finding the focus to read a long and complex book… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Reframing the Intercultural Dialogue on Human Rights: A Philosophical Approach

2014.06.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jeffrey Flynn, Reframing the Intercultural Dialogue on Human Rights: A Philosophical Approach, Routledge, 2014, 223pp., $125.00
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2014.06.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jeffrey Flynn, Reframing the Intercultural Dialogue on Human Rights: A Philosophical Approach, Routledge, 2014, 223pp., $125.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415706025. Reviewed by Stephen C. Angle, Wesleyan University Human rights are brandished, criticized, and debated on streets and in seminars the world over. To some, human rights promise a firm foundation for healthy and equitable societies; to others, they imperil age-old values at the cores of people's identities. To give just one example, Malaysia's prime minister recently worried about "human rightism," which he characterized as a new religion that posed a major threat to the Islamic faith (Malay Mail Online, May 14, 2014). Jeffrey Flynn's important new book is aimed at the central issues raised as actors around the globe grapple with the apparent tension between the universal aspirations of human rights and our manifest differences. Although Flynn's starting. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Question about Mind - William Rapaport responds

I have a question about "solved" games, and the significance of games to artificial intelligence. I take it games provide one way to assess artificial intelligence: if a computer is able to win at a
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I have a question about "solved" games, and the significance of games to artificial intelligence. I take it games provide one way to assess artificial intelligence: if a computer is able to win at a certain game, such as chess, this provides evidence that the computer is intelligent. Suppose that in the future scientists manage to solve chess, and write an algorithm to play chess according to this solution. By hypothesis, then, a computer running this algorithm wins every game whenever possible. Would we conclude on this basis that the computer is intelligent? I have an intuition that intelligence cannot be reduced to any such algorithm, however complex. But that seems quite strange in a way, because it suggests that imperfect play might somehow demonstrate greater intelligence or creativity than perfect play. [If the notion of "solving" chess is problematic, another approach is to consider a computer which plays by exhaustively computing every possible sequence of moves. This is. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Question about Ethics, Sex - Charles Taliaferro responds

When I was a teenager, I started to think about sex all the time, but nobody ever talked to me about it. I may have been talking with someone of the opposite sex, for instance, whose dress
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When I was a teenager, I started to think about sex all the time, but nobody ever talked to me about it. I may have been talking with someone of the opposite sex, for instance, whose dress deliberately accentuated their sexual features, and yet both of us would go on idiotically talking about something else, which neither of us was probably really thinking about. Why is there such a prohibition about pointing out the elephant in the room? Why is it considered morally suspect to make one's sexual reaction to someone an explicit feature of a conversation? Response from: Charles Taliaferro Probably one of the main reasons we shy away from talking with others about sexual attraction unless we are doing so with a partner in a sexually intimate relationship or conversing with a therapist or discussing medical issues (from STDs to pregnancy to birth control) or advising a friend who has asked for advise, is because we see sexual matters as amazingly / profoundly personal and we would. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Question about Philosophy, Value - Miriam Solomon responds

The ancient Greek philosophical schools taught comprehensive philosophies of life. For them, the whole point of doing philosophy was to determine how to live well. Why do contemporary
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The ancient Greek philosophical schools taught comprehensive philosophies of life. For them, the whole point of doing philosophy was to determine how to live well. Why do contemporary philosophers not publish philosophies of life? Has the point of doing philosophy changed? If so, why? Response from: Miriam Solomon Some contemporary philosophers do publish philosophies of life. For example, Paul Thagard's "The Brain and the Meaning of Life" (Princeton, 2010)and Robert Nozick, "The Examined Life" (1990). I suggest that you look at the article on the meaning of life in the online Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. There is a good bibliography at the end of the article. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/life-meaning/

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Question about Mind - Richard Heck responds

I have a question about "solved" games, and the significance of games to artificial intelligence. I take it games provide one way to assess artificial intelligence: if a computer is able to win at a
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I have a question about "solved" games, and the significance of games to artificial intelligence. I take it games provide one way to assess artificial intelligence: if a computer is able to win at a certain game, such as chess, this provides evidence that the computer is intelligent. Suppose that in the future scientists manage to solve chess, and write an algorithm to play chess according to this solution. By hypothesis, then, a computer running this algorithm wins every game whenever possible. Would we conclude on this basis that the computer is intelligent? I have an intuition that intelligence cannot be reduced to any such algorithm, however complex. But that seems quite strange in a way, because it suggests that imperfect play might somehow demonstrate greater intelligence or creativity than perfect play. [If the notion of "solving" chess is problematic, another approach is to consider a computer which plays by exhaustively computing every possible sequence of moves. This is. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"