Integrity and the Virtues of Reason: Leading a Convincing Life

2014.04.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Greg Scherkoske, Integrity and the Virtues of Reason: Leading a Convincing Life, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 264pp.,
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2014.04.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Greg Scherkoske, Integrity and the Virtues of Reason: Leading a Convincing Life, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 264pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107000674. Reviewed by Andrea C. Westlund, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Integrity is a frequently invoked virtue in both public and private life. As Greg Scherkoske points out, we tend to admire people of integrity even when we do not agree with their views or share their convictions. And we tend to think poorly of those who readily abandon, compromise, or betray their convictions in the face of disagreement, social pressure, or temptation. It is commonly thought that integrity is a matter of having firm convictions and sticking to them even in challenging circumstances. But, we also recognize that sticking to one's convictions is not always admirable, and sometimes verges on dogmatism or pig-headedness. We admire those who are able to admit their. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Feminism for Them?

Lean In, The Richer Sex, The End of Men: Women may have won the battle of the sexes, but feminism was supposed to liberate men as well. It hasn’t…
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Lean In, The Richer Sex, The End of Men: Women may have won the battle of the sexes, but feminism was supposed to liberate men as well. It hasn’t… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Jenny Diski and old age

As Jenny Diski gets on in years, she’s been stumped by two questions: How does she know she’s old? When can she start complaining?…
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As Jenny Diski gets on in years, she’s been stumped by two questions: How does she know she’s old? When can she start complaining?… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Fatwa on Rushdie

When the fatwa against Salman Rushdie came down things turned nasty, and literary society took sides. Some of the divisions remain…
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When the fatwa against Salman Rushdie came down things turned nasty, and literary society took sides. Some of the divisions remain… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics

2014.04.33 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Avram Hiller, Ramona Ilea, and Leonard Kahn (eds.), Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics, Routledge, 2014, 194pp.,
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2014.04.33 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Avram Hiller, Ramona Ilea, and Leonard Kahn (eds.), Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics, Routledge, 2014, 194pp., $125.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415823807. Reviewed by Martin Peterson, Eindhoven University of Technology Some environmental ethicists believe that traditional, anthropocentric moral theories cannot be successfully applied to environmental problems. The reason is that anthropocentric theories (by definition) place humans at the center of the ethical discourse, not the environment. Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics can be read as an attempt to correct this misunderstanding. Not every version of consequentialism is anthropocentric, and as several contributors point out, some or all of the often very strong claims defended by non-anthropocentric thinkers can be expressed in a consequentialist framework. By doing so it becomes easier to understand, articulate and critically evaluate. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Legal Interpretivism

[Revised entry by Nicos Stavropoulos on April 29, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Interpretivism about law offers a philosophical explanation of how institutional practice - the legally
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[Revised entry by Nicos Stavropoulos on April 29, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Interpretivism about law offers a philosophical explanation of how institutional practice - the legally significant action and practices of political institutions - modifies legal rights and obligations. Its core claim is that the way in which institutional practice affects the law is determined by certain principles that explain why the practice should have that role. Interpretation of the...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

How sex rules our dreams

What are dreams made of? Male-female conflict, sexual desire, aggression. Put it this way: Dreams are a linchpin of reproductive fitness…
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What are dreams made of? Male-female conflict, sexual desire, aggression. Put it this way: Dreams are a linchpin of reproductive fitness… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Confetti Uncut

The story of confetti. Typically it’s traced to gift-giving in ancient Greece, but another explanation lurks: The paper shrapnel signals darker desires…
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The story of confetti. Typically it’s traced to gift-giving in ancient Greece, but another explanation lurks: The paper shrapnel signals darker desires… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Beauty of metaphor

Can anyone “sigh blood” or play “whisper music” on her hair? No matter: As Aristotle knew, a command of metaphor is “the mark of genius”…
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Can anyone “sigh blood” or play “whisper music” on her hair? No matter: As Aristotle knew, a command of metaphor is “the mark of genius”… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Phenomenology in French Philosophy: Early Encounters

2014.04.32 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christian Dupont, Phenomenology in French Philosophy: Early Encounters, Springer, 2014, 338pp, $129.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2014.04.32 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christian Dupont, Phenomenology in French Philosophy: Early Encounters, Springer, 2014, 338pp, $129.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789400746404. Reviewed by Edward Baring, Drew University The French reception of German phenomenology was the result of one of the most consequential border crossings in modern intellectual history. In the interwar period, the work of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, and to a lesser extent Max Scheler began to find traction west of the Rhine, where it proved to be a critical stimulus to philosophical renewal. Consequently, German phenomenology shaped the work of some of the most recognizable figures of twentieth-century French thought. The dynamics of this reception has attracted the interest of numerous intellectual historians and philosophers over the past fifteen years, and a vibrant field of scholarly inquiry has emerged. Christian Dupont's book is the latest instantiation. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News