How a little circle of Southern California Straussians became the intellectual hub of Trumpism. <strong>Meet the Claremonsters</strong>

How a little circle of Southern California Straussians became the intellectual hub of Trumpism. Meet the
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How a little circle of Southern California Straussians became the intellectual hub of Trumpism. Meet the Claremonsters

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Nietzsche's Life and Works

[Revised entry by Robert Wicks on March 17, 2017. Changes to: Main text] [Editor&#39;s Note: The following entry was previously published under the title &quot;Friedrich Nietzsche&quot;. A new entry on that
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[Revised entry by Robert Wicks on March 17, 2017. Changes to: Main text] [Editor's Note: The following entry was previously published under the title "Friedrich Nietzsche". A new entry on that topic has now been published.]...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

What kind of writer would <strong>Jane Austen</strong> have gone on to be had she lived beyond her early 40s? &ldquo;Of all great writers," said Virginia Woolf, "she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness&rdquo;

What kind of writer would Jane Austen have gone on to be had she lived beyond her early 40s? &amp;ldquo;Of all great writers,&quot; said Virginia Woolf, &quot;she is the most difficult to catch in the act of
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What kind of writer would Jane Austen have gone on to be had she lived beyond her early 40s? “Of all great writers," said Virginia Woolf, "she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Scantily Clad Heroes

Feminists have long been critical of how female superheroes are presented in comics. In terms of appearance, they have expressed concerns about the body types of female heroes, the way they are
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Feminists have long been critical of how female superheroes are presented in comics. In terms of appearance, they have expressed concerns about the body types of female heroes, the way they are posed, and the skimpy costumes most wear. One interesting visual response is the Hawkeye Initiative in which Hawkeye (or another male superhero) is drawn in the same pose and costume type as a female superhero. As would be imagined, the male hero looks absurd when so posed and costumed, which is exactly the point. While the presentation of female superheroes in comics is certainly a first world problem, it does raise some important concerns. These concerns normally focus on such matters as the impact on body image, but my interest here is with considering the superhero costume from a practical standpoint. That is, what such costumes should be like when considered from a realistic perspective. While I am no expert on fashion, I will draw on my experiences as an athlete, martial artist and gamer. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Virtual Colloquium: Jeanine Diller, “Global and Local Atheisms”

Today&amp;#8217;s Virtual Colloquium is &amp;#8220;Global and Local Atheisms&amp;#8221; by Jeanine Diller. Dr. Diller received her PhD from the University of Michigan and is currently an assistant professor in
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Today’s Virtual Colloquium is “Global and Local Atheisms” by Jeanine Diller. Dr. Diller received her PhD from the University of Michigan and is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy and Program on Religious Studies of the University of Toledo in Ohio. Her research focuses on he concept of God and alternative pictures [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Unlike some name-brand atheists, Nietzsche didn&rsquo;t waste time on easy targets like miracles or relics. He <strong>laughed at God</strong>. And nothing restores a sense of proportion like a sense of humor

Unlike some name-brand atheists, Nietzsche didn&amp;rsquo;t waste time on easy targets like miracles or relics. He laughed at God. And nothing restores a sense of proportion like a sense of
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Unlike some name-brand atheists, Nietzsche didn’t waste time on easy targets like miracles or relics. He laughed at God. And nothing restores a sense of proportion like a sense of humor

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Why has <em>The Hatred of Poetry</em> been such a publishing success? Yes, <strong>Ben Lerner</strong> is witty and charming. But more important, he gives readers permission to be a bit philistine

Why has The Hatred of Poetry been such a publishing success? Yes, Ben Lerner is witty and charming. But more important, he gives readers permission to be a bit
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Why has The Hatred of Poetry been such a publishing success? Yes, Ben Lerner is witty and charming. But more important, he gives readers permission to be a bit philistine

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What kind of writer would <strong>Jane Austen</strong> have gone on to be had she lived beyond her early forties? &ldquo;Of all great writers," said Virginia Woolf, "she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness&rdquo;

What kind of writer would Jane Austen have gone on to be had she lived beyond her early forties? &amp;ldquo;Of all great writers,&quot; said Virginia Woolf, &quot;she is the most difficult to catch in the act of
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What kind of writer would Jane Austen have gone on to be had she lived beyond her early forties? “Of all great writers," said Virginia Woolf, "she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Terrorism Unjustified: The Use and Misuse of Political Violence

2017.03.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Vicente Medina, Terrorism Unjustified: The Use and Misuse of Political Violence, Rowman and Littlefield, 2016, 289pp., $80.00
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2017.03.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Vicente Medina, Terrorism Unjustified: The Use and Misuse of Political Violence, Rowman and Littlefield, 2016, 289pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781442253513. Reviewed by Georg Meggle, University of Leipzig/American University in Cairo This book is on the ethics of terrorism. And its very title already gives us Medina's position: terrorism, being the sort of political violence it is (i.e., terrorism as understood by Medina), is per se unjustified; so every use of this special sort of political violence must be a misuse that is morally to be condemned. Before spelling out and discussing this position, Medina gives us (chapter 1) a short overview of the history of terrorism. In chapters 2-3 he does what every good philosopher has to start with: develops a map of the semantics of the wide field in question, ending up with an explicit definition of the term "terrorism" as used in his own arguments. Medina's main. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Wainwright on Berkeley and Edwards

The second essay in Idealism and Christian Theology is &amp;#8220;Berkeley, Edwards, Idealism, and the Knowledge of God&amp;#8221; by William J. Wainwright. The aim of this article is to explore and explain
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The second essay in Idealism and Christian Theology is “Berkeley, Edwards, Idealism, and the Knowledge of God” by William J. Wainwright. The aim of this article is to explore and explain similarities between Berkeley and Edwards in terms of the religious and cultural context in which they wrote, particularly the threat of deism and freethinking [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion