Paul Grice

[Revised entry by Richard E. Grandy and Richard Warner on October 9, 2017. Changes to: Main text] Herbert Paul Grice, universally known as Paul, was born on March 13, 1913 in Birmingham, England
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[Revised entry by Richard E. Grandy and Richard Warner on October 9, 2017. Changes to: Main text] Herbert Paul Grice, universally known as Paul, was born on March 13, 1913 in Birmingham, England and died on August 28, 1988 in Berkeley CA. Grice received firsts in classical honours moderation (1933) and literae humaniores (1935) from Corpus Christi College, Oxford. After a year teaching in a public school, he returned to Oxford where, with a nearly five year interruption for service in the Royal Navy, he taught in various positions until 1967 when he moved to...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Japanese Pure Land Philosophy

[Revised entry by Dennis Hirota on October 9, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Pure Land Buddhist teachings have played a major role in Japanese intellectual and social life from the
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[Revised entry by Dennis Hirota on October 9, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Pure Land Buddhist teachings have played a major role in Japanese intellectual and social life from the sixth century CE, when emissaries from the Korean peninsula first officially introduced Buddhist images and texts to the Japanese court, down to the present. While the influence of the Zen tradition on Japanese thought and culture is widely acknowledged, the role of Pure Land Buddhist concepts and sensibilities have tended to...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Henry James transformed the novel form into something new. Turn to chapter 27 of <em>The Portrait of a Lady</em>&nbsp;to see the<strong> birth of the psychological novel</strong>

Henry James transformed the novel form into something new. Turn to chapter 27 of The Portrait of a Lady&amp;nbsp;to see the birth of the psychological
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Henry James transformed the novel form into something new. Turn to chapter 27 of The Portrait of a Lady to see the birth of the psychological novel

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In the early 1930s, <strong>Nazi jurists</strong>&nbsp;debated how best to create a racist regime. They found inspiration in American law

In the early 1930s, Nazi jurists&amp;nbsp;debated how best to create a racist regime. They found inspiration in American
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In the early 1930s, Nazi jurists debated how best to create a racist regime. They found inspiration in American law

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Some are excited, others scared. Some are cautious, others jubilant. Some are utopian, others pessimistic. <strong>Futurists: a taxonomy</strong>

Some are excited, others scared. Some are cautious, others jubilant. Some are utopian, others pessimistic. Futurists: a
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Some are excited, others scared. Some are cautious, others jubilant. Some are utopian, others pessimistic. Futurists: a taxonomy

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Henry James transformed the novel form into something entirely new. Turn your copy of <em>The Portrait of a Lady</em>&nbsp;to chapter 27 to see the<strong> birth of the psychological novel</strong>

Henry James transformed the novel form into something entirely new. Turn your copy of The Portrait of a Lady&amp;nbsp;to chapter 27 to see the birth of the psychological
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Henry James transformed the novel form into something entirely new. Turn your copy of The Portrait of a Lady to chapter 27 to see the birth of the psychological novel

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In the early 1930s, <strong>Nazi jurists</strong>&nbsp;debated how best to create a racist regime. They looked to other nations for models. They found inspiration in American law

In the early 1930s, Nazi jurists&amp;nbsp;debated how best to create a racist regime. They looked to other nations for models. They found inspiration in American
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In the early 1930s, Nazi jurists debated how best to create a racist regime. They looked to other nations for models. They found inspiration in American law

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Some are excited, others are scared. Some are cautious, others are jubilant. Some are utopians, others are pessimists. <strong>Futurists: a taxonomy</strong>

Some are excited, others are scared. Some are cautious, others are jubilant. Some are utopians, others are pessimists. Futurists: a
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Some are excited, others are scared. Some are cautious, others are jubilant. Some are utopians, others are pessimists. Futurists: a taxonomy

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Panpsychism: Contemporary Perspectives

2017.10.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Godehard Bruntrup and&#160;Ludwig Jaskolla (eds.), Panpsychism: Contemporary Perspectives, Oxford University Press, 2017, 414pp.,
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2017.10.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Godehard Bruntrup and Ludwig Jaskolla (eds.), Panpsychism: Contemporary Perspectives, Oxford University Press, 2017, 414pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199359943. Reviewed by Joseph Levine, University of Massachusetts Amherst When I was interviewing for my first tenure-track job, at Boston University, in the winter of 1981, I gave a paper on the problem qualia posed for materialism. In the paper I argued that functionalism, the then (and still) reigning theory on the mind-body relation, couldn't adequately account for qualia. In the question period, Abner Shimony, the renowned philosopher of physics, asked me the following question: what if we attribute consciousness to elementary particles? Wouldn't that help solve the problem? My initial response was the proverbial "incredulous stare." But this was a job interview, so more was required; after all, you don't want to offend a senior member of the department. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Intelligible Non-Natural Concerns

I&#39;ve previously argued that -- even by non-naturalist lights -- what matters are various natural properties (e.g. causing pleasure or pain), and the role of the non-natural normative properties is
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I've previously argued that -- even by non-naturalist lights -- what matters are various natural properties (e.g. causing pleasure or pain), and the role of the non-natural normative properties is instead to "mark" the significance of these natural properties.But it's worth flagging that there are exceptions. While I take it that typically what matters are natural features of the world, this is not a universal restriction on what matters. After all, normative properties plausibly have the further normative property of being worthy of philosophical scrutiny. So I do not deny that there may be special cases when it is perfectly reasonable to take an interest in morality de dicto. (Responding to moral uncertainty may be another such case.) My claim was the more modest one that non-naturalism does not commit us to having non-natural properties take center stage in our moral lives.The special cases where normative properties themselves are of legitimate interest are precisely cases. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera