<strong>Inside Wagner's head</strong>. The composer's essence was self-dramatization wrapped in contradiction. He was, himself, an all-embracing work of art

Inside Wagner&#39;s head. The composer&#39;s essence was self-dramatization wrapped in contradiction. He was, himself, an all-embracing work of
Philosophy News image
Inside Wagner's head. The composer's essence was self-dramatization wrapped in contradiction. He was, himself, an all-embracing work of art

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Why keep a diary?</strong> Benjamin Franklin sought to log 13 virtues a day, Samuel Johnson &ldquo;to methodise&rdquo; his life. For Susan Sontag, private writing was a source of strength

Why keep a diary? Benjamin Franklin sought to log 13 virtues a day, Samuel Johnson &amp;ldquo;to methodise&amp;rdquo; his life. For Susan Sontag, private writing was a source of
Philosophy News image
Why keep a diary? Benjamin Franklin sought to log 13 virtues a day, Samuel Johnson “to methodise” his life. For Susan Sontag, private writing was a source of strength

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Moses Mendelssohn's Living Script: Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism

2017.06.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Elias Sacks, Moses Mendelssohn&#39;s Living Script: Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism, Indiana University Press, 2017, 316pp.,
Philosophy News image
2017.06.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Elias Sacks, Moses Mendelssohn's Living Script: Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism, Indiana University Press, 2017, 316pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780253023742. Reviewed by Corey W. Dyck, Western University/Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg In 1783, Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) published his Jerusalem: or on Religious Power and Judaism, an extended argument for the limits of the state and religion with respect to individual conscience, as well as an impassioned defense of the reasonability and modernity of Jewish religious practice. In connection with his discussion of the latter in the second part of Jerusalem, Mendelssohn writes: The ceremonial law itself is a kind of living script, rousing the mind and heart, full of meaning, never ceasing to inspire contemplation and to provide the occasion and opportunity for oral instruction. What a student did and saw being done from morning till night. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Descartes' Theory of Ideas

[Revised entry by Kurt Smith on June 14, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Ideas are among the most important items in Descartes&#39; philosophy. They serve to unify his ontology
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Kurt Smith on June 14, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Ideas are among the most important items in Descartes' philosophy. They serve to unify his ontology and epistemology. As he says in a letter to Guillaume Gibieuf (1583 - 1650), dated 19 January 1642, "I am certain that I can have no knowledge of what is outside me except by means of the ideas I have within me."[1] Descartes never published anything that specifically worked out a theory of ideas. Even so, he said enough in published and unpublished...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Mid-June etymology gleanings

John Cowan pointed out that queer “quaint, odd” can be and is still used today despite its latest (predominant) sense. Yes, I know. Quite intentionally, I sometimes use the phrase queer smile. It
Philosophy News image
From the life of words John Cowan pointed out that queer “quaint, odd” can be and is still used today despite its latest (predominant) sense. Yes, I know. Quite intentionally, I sometimes use the phrase queer smile. It usually arouses a few embarrassed grins. My students assume that a man in the winter of his days is so un-cool that he does not know what this adjective now means. I have never tried queer smell and will probably not risk it, but I once wrote a post on qualm (13 August 2014), whose German cognate means “dense smoke”—a queer pair, when you come to think of it. Peter Maher sent me an ad about a store, announcing twenty things to do in intercourse, all of them quite innocent and unexciting. He also reminds us of the famous word homely, “unattractive” in North America, but “cozy” on the other side of the Atlantic. By contrast, homey, I think, has positive connotations everywhere. All kinds of impulses can come from home. Thus, Icelandic heimskur (-sk is a suffix, and. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

After decades of research and dozens of excellent books, is there anything new to say about <strong>Hitchcock, Welles, and Kubrick</strong>? Yes, quite a lot

After decades of research and dozens of excellent books, is there anything new to say about Hitchcock, Welles, and Kubrick? Yes, quite a
Philosophy News image
After decades of research and dozens of excellent books, is there anything new to say about Hitchcock, Welles, and Kubrick? Yes, quite a lot

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Logics for Analyzing Power in Normal Form Games

[New Entry by Paolo Turrini on June 14, 2017.] This entry discusses the use of mathematical languages to express and analyze the formal properties of power in normal form games. The mathematical
Philosophy News image
[New Entry by Paolo Turrini on June 14, 2017.] This entry discusses the use of mathematical languages to express and analyze the formal properties of power in normal form games. The mathematical languages discussed in this entry will be referred to as logics, and classified according to their ability to express game-related concepts. The material in this entry will be limited to the logical analysis of...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Futurists dismiss religion </strong>but anoint &ldquo;evangelists&rdquo; of technology and &ldquo;oracles&rdquo; of artificial intelligence. Are futurists really as atheistic as they think?

Futurists dismiss religion but anoint &amp;ldquo;evangelists&amp;rdquo; of technology and &amp;ldquo;oracles&amp;rdquo; of artificial intelligence. Are futurists really as atheistic as they
Philosophy News image
Futurists dismiss religion but anoint “evangelists” of technology and “oracles” of artificial intelligence. Are futurists really as atheistic as they think?

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>James Baldwin's FBI file </strong>runs 1,884 pages. It's full of marginalia, including this, in 1964, from J. Edgar Hoover: &ldquo;Isn&rsquo;t Baldwin a Well-Known Pervert?&rdquo;

James Baldwin&#39;s FBI file runs 1,884 pages. It&#39;s full of marginalia, including this, in 1964, from J. Edgar Hoover: &amp;ldquo;Isn&amp;rsquo;t Baldwin a Well-Known
Philosophy News image
James Baldwin's FBI file runs 1,884 pages. It's full of marginalia, including this, in 1964, from J. Edgar Hoover: “Isn’t Baldwin a Well-Known Pervert?”

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Moral and Political Philosophy of Immigration: Liberty, Security, and Equality

2017.06.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jos&#233; Jorge Mendoza, The Moral and Political Philosophy of Immigration: Liberty, Security, and Equality, Lexington Books, 2017,
Philosophy News image
2017.06.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews José Jorge Mendoza, The Moral and Political Philosophy of Immigration: Liberty, Security, and Equality, Lexington Books, 2017, 141pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781498508513. Reviewed by Douglas MacKay, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Four months into the presidency of Donald Trump, it is a common refrain that the Trump administration is "not ready to govern." Many take some comfort in this; the Trump administration's incompetence has arguably made the realization of Candidate Trump's campaign promises less likely -- e.g. repealing the Affordable Care Act. However, the Trump administration has made significant progress towards fulfilling Candidate Trump's promises regarding immigration enforcement. Trump has signed two executive orders that, among other things, direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to use state and local police officers to enforce immigration law, and widen the scope of. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News