<strong>Christophe Guilluy,</strong> who calls himself a geographer, studies gentrification in France. Ideologically and intellectually, he is difficult to place. He's becoming impossible to ignore

Christophe Guilluy, who calls himself a geographer, studies gentrification in France. Ideologically and intellectually, he is difficult to place. He&#39;s becoming impossible to
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Christophe Guilluy, who calls himself a geographer, studies gentrification in France. Ideologically and intellectually, he is difficult to place. He's becoming impossible to ignore

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

From Valuing to Value: A Defense of Subjectivism

2017.05.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Sobel, From Valuing to Value: A Defense of Subjectivism, Oxford University Press, 2016, 312pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.05.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Sobel, From Valuing to Value: A Defense of Subjectivism, Oxford University Press, 2016, 312pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198712640. Reviewed by Ben Bramble, Trinity College Dublin David Sobel's book collects fifteen essays (fourteen reprinted, one new) on subjectivism about value, the view that "things have value because we value them" (1). Sobel has three main goals: to "make [subjectivism] clearer, underline its main strengths and weaknesses, and try to persuade you that the view is genuinely attractive and plausible even after sustained scrutiny" (3). The book is intended as merely the first step on an exciting journey from valuing to value (accordingly, it is depicted on the book's front cover as a small step-ladder leading up into a dazzling but treacherous mountain). Subjectivism about a particular normative domain holds that normativity in that domain flows from, or has its source in, an. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Addicted to opium and always in debt, <strong>Thomas De Quincey </strong>fled his own child&rsquo;s wake to escape a creditor. And yet he maintained a curious optimism

Addicted to opium and always in debt, Thomas De Quincey fled his own child&amp;rsquo;s wake to escape a creditor. And yet he maintained a curious
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Addicted to opium and always in debt, Thomas De Quincey fled his own child’s wake to escape a creditor. And yet he maintained a curious optimism

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Arthur Schopenhauer

[Revised entry by Robert Wicks on May 11, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Arthur Schopenhauer was among the first 19th century philosophers to contend that at its core, the universe is
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[Revised entry by Robert Wicks on May 11, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Arthur Schopenhauer was among the first 19th century philosophers to contend that at its core, the universe is not a rational place. Inspired by Plato and Kant, both of whom regarded the world as being more amenable to reason, Schopenhauer developed their philosophies into an instinct-recognizing and ultimately ascetic outlook, emphasizing that in the face of a world filled with endless strife, we ought to minimize our natural desires for the sake of achieving a more tranquil frame of mind and a disposition towards...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Why do Japanese audiences adore Woody Allen films? Because <strong>Jewish humor</strong> has become a marker of elite sophistication

Why do Japanese audiences adore Woody Allen films? Because Jewish humor has become a marker of elite
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Why do Japanese audiences adore Woody Allen films? Because Jewish humor has become a marker of elite sophistication

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Poor <strong>Thomas De Quincey</strong>! Addicted to opium and always in debt, he fled his own child&rsquo;s wake to escape a creditor. And yet he maintained a curious optimism

Poor Thomas De Quincey! Addicted to opium and always in debt, he fled his own child&amp;rsquo;s wake to escape a creditor. And yet he maintained a curious
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Poor Thomas De Quincey! Addicted to opium and always in debt, he fled his own child’s wake to escape a creditor. And yet he maintained a curious optimism

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Pointed hats, broomsticks, caldrons, cats. Why do we assume <strong>witches look a certain way</strong>? Blame the rise of the mass-produced woodcut

Pointed hats, broomsticks, caldrons, cats. Why do we assume witches look a certain way? Blame the rise of the mass-produced
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Pointed hats, broomsticks, caldrons, cats. Why do we assume witches look a certain way? Blame the rise of the mass-produced woodcut

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Irony and Idealism: Rereading Schlegel, Hegel, and Kierkegaard

2017.05.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Fred Rush, Irony and Idealism: Rereading Schlegel, Hegel, and Kierkegaard, Oxford University Press, 2016, 312pp., $85.00 (hbk),
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2017.05.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Fred Rush, Irony and Idealism: Rereading Schlegel, Hegel, and Kierkegaard, Oxford University Press, 2016, 312pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199688227. Reviewed by Allen Speight, Boston University In his ambitious and insightful new book, Fred Rush begins by noticing the developments in the academic discussion of German romanticism that have taken place over the last twenty years. Once mostly the province of literary scholars, the field of German romanticism also came to acquire in this period remarkable new interest within the Anglophone philosophical world. One question raised by this new philosophical attention, of course, is just what is meant by "romanticism" at all. Rush notes the wide valence of the term in a cultural and historical sense: there is, as he argues, both a "permeability" between national borders that has allowed reciprocal influence between German and English or French sources of. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Galileo Galilei

[Revised entry by Peter Machamer on May 10, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Galileo Galilei (1564 - 1642) has always played a key role in any history of science and, in many histories
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[Revised entry by Peter Machamer on May 10, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Galileo Galilei (1564 - 1642) has always played a key role in any history of science and, in many histories of philosophy, he is a, if not the, central figure of the scientific revolution of the 17th Century. His work in physics or natural philosophy, astronomy, and the methodology of science still evoke debate after over 400 years. His role in promoting the Copernican theory and his travails and trials with the Roman Church are stories that still...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Monthly gleanings for April 2017

The previous post on Nostratic linguistics was also part of the “gleanings,” because the inspiration for it came from a query, but a few more tidbits have to be taken care of before summer sets in.
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The previous post on Nostratic linguistics was also part of the “gleanings,” because the inspiration for it came from a query, but a few more tidbits have to be taken care of before summer sets in. Sleeveless errand (See the post for 26 April 2017.) Skeat’s idea that sleeveless means “imperfect; hence poor, like a garment without sleeves” does not go much farther than Horne Tooke’s suggestion that sleeveless should be understood as “without a cover or pretence.” Skeat dismissed Tooke’s idea as making little sense, but the difficulty lies elsewhere. We have to find out where it was bad, dangerous, or silly to wear a sleeveless piece of clothing. Stephen Goranson wrote me a letter and cited several examples in which sleeveless referred to knights-errant or arrant. In some way, those examples, though late, may confirm the idea that the figurative sense of sleeveless emerged in connection with chivalry. Also, perhaps errant evoked the idea of errand. But many details remain hidden. As for. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog