<strong>Poet-critics</strong>&nbsp;long ago traded the patronage of aristocrats for that of the government, foundation, or university administrator. That system is now partially in ruins

Poet-critics&amp;nbsp;long ago traded the patronage of aristocrats for that of the government, foundation, or university administrator. That system is now partially in
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Poet-critics long ago traded the patronage of aristocrats for that of the government, foundation, or university administrator. That system is now partially in ruins

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What happened to the <strong>public intellectual</strong>? She became a partisan. Hannah Arendt warned about translating philosophical insight into political commitment&nbsp;

What happened to the public intellectual? She became a partisan. Hannah Arendt warned about translating philosophical insight into political
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What happened to the public intellectual? She became a partisan. Hannah Arendt warned about translating philosophical insight into political commitment 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

&ldquo;What the hell have I taken on?&rdquo; That was Ian Buruma's second reaction to being named <strong>editor of the NYRB</strong>. His first reaction: "a sense of euphoria"

&amp;ldquo;What the hell have I taken on?&amp;rdquo; That was Ian Buruma&#39;s second reaction to being named editor of the NYRB. His first reaction: &quot;a sense of
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“What the hell have I taken on?” That was Ian Buruma's second reaction to being named editor of the NYRB. His first reaction: "a sense of euphoria"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Epistemology

2017.09.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ernest Sosa,&#160;Epistemology, Princeton University Press, 2017, 235pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780691137490. &#160; Reviewed by Adam
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2017.09.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ernest Sosa, Epistemology, Princeton University Press, 2017, 235pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780691137490.   Reviewed by Adam Carter, University of Glasgow This is, among other merits, the best epistemology textbook for advanced undergrads of which I'm aware. It certainly starts off with a bang: right from the first chapter, Sosa more-or-less tells you that much of what you've taken for granted about Descartes' epistemological project in the Meditations is mistaken -- or at the very least, overlooks key pieces of the picture that, once in place, help to unlock Descartes' deeper agenda. On Sosa's preferred, Pyrrhonian-style virtue-theoretic reading of the Meditations, the notions of judgment, aptness, and competence take centre stage in Descartes' project, as does the distinction between two very different levels, first-order and second-order, of epistemic performance (and, accordingly, of belief).  

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Science Fiction and the Moral Imagination now published

My new book, Science Fiction and the Moral Imagination: Visions, Minds, Ethics, has just been published by Springer in trade paperback and Kindle editions. You can find the book on Springer&amp;#8217;s
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My new book, Science Fiction and the Moral Imagination: Visions, Minds, Ethics, has just been published by Springer in trade paperback and Kindle editions. You can find the book on Springer’s own site or via online retailers such as Amazon. Science Fiction and the Moral Imagination does offer my own potted account of the nature of philosophy (in general) and of moral philosophy (in particular) in order to assist the argument. It does not, however, belong to the genre of pedagogical books that aim to introduce philosophy through science fiction. If anything, it is more an exercise in the history and philosophy of science fiction. More specifically it examines the intersection of science fiction and moral philosophy. Putting it another way, Science Fiction and the Moral Imagination examines ways in which science fiction novels, stories, movies, etc., engage with metaethical and normative ethical themes that are also of interest to moral philosophers. I hope to have discussed this. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

He couldn&rsquo;t sing and didn&rsquo;t know anything about the music, yet <strong>James Baldwin</strong> called himself a blues singer. What does it mean for a writer to be a blues singer?

He couldn&amp;rsquo;t sing and didn&amp;rsquo;t know anything about the music, yet James Baldwin called himself a blues singer. What does it mean for a writer to be a blues
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He couldn’t sing and didn’t know anything about the music, yet James Baldwin called himself a blues singer. What does it mean for a writer to be a blues singer?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Does <strong>what you eat </strong> reveal the content of your character? "While extraordinary circumstances produce extraordinary women, food makes them recognizable"

Does what you eat reveal the content of your character? &quot;While extraordinary circumstances produce extraordinary women, food makes them
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Does what you eat reveal the content of your character? "While extraordinary circumstances produce extraordinary women, food makes them recognizable"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Silicon Valley's latest "body hack": <strong>microdosing LSD</strong>. It's supposed to make you more creative. The real allure: It makes you more productive

Silicon Valley&#39;s latest &quot;body hack&quot;: microdosing LSD. It&#39;s supposed to make you more creative. The real allure: It makes you more
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Silicon Valley's latest "body hack": microdosing LSD. It's supposed to make you more creative. The real allure: It makes you more productive

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Religious Studies Postgraduate Essay Prize

Submissions are invited for the Religious Studies Postgraduate Essay Prize, which is sponsored jointly by Cambridge University Press and the British Society for the Philosophy of Religion. The
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Submissions are invited for the Religious Studies Postgraduate Essay Prize, which is sponsored jointly by Cambridge University Press and the British Society for the Philosophy of Religion. The winning entry will be published in Religious Studies, and the winner awarded £300. The Prize is an international prize, and open to all those who are registered [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Reasoning & Natural Disasters

As this is being written, Irma is scouring its way across the Atlantic and my adopted state of Florida will soon feel her terrible embrace. Nearby, Texas is still endeavoring to dry out from its own
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As this is being written, Irma is scouring its way across the Atlantic and my adopted state of Florida will soon feel her terrible embrace. Nearby, Texas is still endeavoring to dry out from its own recent watery disaster. The forces of nature can be overwhelming in their destructive power, but poor reasoning on the part of humans can contribute to the magnitude of a natural disaster. As such, it is worth considering how poor reasoning impacts disaster planning both by individuals and by the state. Or lack of planning. While human activity can impact nature, the power of nature can kill any human and sweep away anything we can construct. As such, even the best planning can come to nothing. To think that because perfect planning is impossible we should simply let nature shake the dice for us would be to fall into the classic perfectionist fallacy. This is to engage in a false dilemma in which the two assumed options are doing nothing or having a perfect option. While there are no. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy