Neuroscience marches on, but if it becomes possible to able to <strong>scan and upload your brain</strong>, will the result be <em>you</em>? Humans are not brains in vats

Neuroscience marches on, but if it becomes possible to able to scan and upload your brain, will the result be you? Humans are not brains in
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Neuroscience marches on, but if it becomes possible to able to scan and upload your brain, will the result be you? Humans are not brains in vats

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Our notions of &ldquo;progress&rdquo; are fatuous. We embrace empty ideas. We worship celebrity humanitarians. Is the key to real progress simply to <strong>forget the past</strong>?

Our notions of &amp;ldquo;progress&amp;rdquo; are fatuous. We embrace empty ideas. We worship celebrity humanitarians. Is the key to real progress simply to forget the
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Our notions of “progress” are fatuous. We embrace empty ideas. We worship celebrity humanitarians. Is the key to real progress simply to forget the past?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Victorian spiritualism</strong> was not just a fixation on death. Its history includes Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, P.T. Barnum, and the telegraph

Victorian spiritualism was not just a fixation on death. Its history includes Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, P.T. Barnum, and the
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Victorian spiritualism was not just a fixation on death. Its history includes Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, P.T. Barnum, and the telegraph

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

There is: The Event and the Finitude of Appearing

2016.07.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Claude Romano, There is: The Event and the Finitude of Appearing, Michael B. Smith (tr.), Fordham University Press, 2015, 271pp.,
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2016.07.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Claude Romano, There is: The Event and the Finitude of Appearing, Michael B. Smith (tr.), Fordham University Press, 2015, 271pp., $35.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780823267156. Reviewed by Pierre-Jean Renaudie, University of Porto This is the third volume (originally published in French as Il y a, 2003) in Claude Romano's 'evential hermeneutics' project. It evolved from Event and World (2009; L’événement et le monde, 1998) and Event and Time (2014; L’événement et le temps, 1999).  This third volume laid the groundwork for Romano's major work,  At the Heart of Reason (2015; Au cœur de la raison, la phénoménologie, 2010). In that later work, Romano developed an in-depth confrontation between phenomenology and its analytic criticisms, and he argued for the legitimacy of a renewal of phenomenology that addresses some of the main challenges of contemporary thought. With the translation of these four books, English speakers. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Ethical change in the Catholic Church

In just a little more than three years as the Bishop of Rome, Pope Francis appears to have disrupted what many thought was a straight and unchangeable course of moral teaching in the Catholic
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In just a little more than three years as the Bishop of Rome, Pope Francis appears to have disrupted what many thought was a straight and unchangeable course of moral teaching in the Catholic Church. Some of the more conservative members of the church are worried that the fundamentals of that teaching are being ignored, or worse, thrown overboard. Francis’s call for a ‘poorer’ church and a world that cares about the environment displays a significant turn in Catholic politics. But it is his frequent comments about personal and sexual morality that seem to upset people the most. Instead of talking about rules and behaviours, he has very clearly shifted the emphasis to people who find themselves in difficult situations. While some are worried about these changes, others, like myself, are delighted that the reforms in moral theology called for in Vatican II are finally being allowed to take place. The last two documents of that council, Gaudium et spes and Dignitatis humanae,. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

The obscure objects of mass production

The objects of mass production – screws, nails, cell phones, cars – are everywhere. They are, for the most part, humdrum and insignificant and beneath the notice of philosophers. But in fact, I
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The objects of mass production – screws, nails, cell phones, cars – are everywhere. They are, for the most part, humdrum and insignificant and beneath the notice of philosophers. But in fact, I shall suggest, they are deeply mysterious from an ontological point of view. Here is something that actually happened this morning, I folded a piece of origami paper (square and uniformly coloured) in a complicated way, made a single cut across the result, and ended up with two paper decorations. As I made the cut, one of them fell to my left – decoration A. The other fell to my right – decoration B. But suppose, hypothetically, that the piece of paper I grabbed had been put into the packet the other way round, rotated by 180˚. I would have grabbed the same piece and gone through the same process of folding and cutting. One decoration would have fallen to my left, one to my right. Would I have produced the same two decorations I in fact produced, namely A and B? And, supposing the answer to. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

The Notation in Principia Mathematica

[Revised entry by Bernard Linsky on July 17, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Principia Mathematica [PM] by A.N. Whitehead and Bertrand Russell, published 1910 - 1913 in three volumes by
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[Revised entry by Bernard Linsky on July 17, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Principia Mathematica [PM] by A.N. Whitehead and Bertrand Russell, published 1910 - 1913 in three volumes by Cambridge University Press, contains a derivation of large portions of mathematics using notions and principles of symbolic logic. The notation in that work has been superseded by the subsequent development of logic during the 20th century, to the extent that the beginner has trouble reading PM at all. This article provides an introduction to the symbolism of PM, showing how that symbolism can...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The agonies of <strong>H.T. Tsiang</strong>: literary rejection, an imagined feud with Pearl S. Buck, a deportation order. His life was stranger than his fiction

The agonies of H.T. Tsiang: literary rejection, an imagined feud with Pearl S. Buck, a deportation order. His life was stranger than his
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The agonies of H.T. Tsiang: literary rejection, an imagined feud with Pearl S. Buck, a deportation order. His life was stranger than his fiction

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Enlightenment and visual impairment

Blindness is a recurrent image in Enlightenment rhetoric. It is used in a political context to indicate a lack of awareness, seen in a letter from Edmund Burke to the chevalier de La Bintinnaye, in
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Blindness is a recurrent image in Enlightenment rhetoric. It is used in a political context to indicate a lack of awareness, seen in a letter from Edmund Burke to the chevalier de La Bintinnaye, in poetic rhetoric, with the stories of the blind poets Milton, Homer, and Ossian circulating among the intelligentsia of the time, or simply as a physical irritation, when writers with long lives and extensive correspondences frequently complained of their eyesight deteriorating. The reception of those with total blindness, however, changed during the course of the long eighteenth century. The experiences of three people (acknowledged as blind) serves to show the ways Enlightenment thinkers, and eighteenth century society in general, responded to those who were rendered separate by their blindness. The first is John Vermaasen, who plays a small but fascinating role in the evolution of Enlightenment epistemology, appearing as a living thought experiment in Robert Boyle’s Experiments and. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Global Bioethics Initative

Conference Name: Global Bioethics Initiative Conference Dates: July 11-22, 2016 Submission Deadline: April 15, 2016 Location: New York, New York Flyer: Global Bioethics
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Conference Name: Global Bioethics Initiative Conference Dates: July 11-22, 2016 Submission Deadline: April 15, 2016 Location: New York, New York Flyer: Global Bioethics Initiative

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News source: Events