Workshop: Epistemic Consequentialism

November 21, 2014 London School of Economics Participants: Clayton Littlejohn (UCL) Jennifer Carr (Leeds) Richard Pettigrew (Bristol) Hilary Greaves (Oxford) Jeffrey Dunn (DePauw) Kristoffer
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November 21, 2014 London School of Economics Participants: Clayton Littlejohn (UCL) Jennifer Carr (Leeds) Richard Pettigrew (Bristol) Hilary Greaves (Oxford) Jeffrey Dunn (DePauw) Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (Kent) Time and place: 10:00 to 17:45 in LAK 2.06 (second floor) in the Lakatos building. A workshop schedule will be posted closer to date. Registration: Registration is free, but please e-mail Jeffrey Dunn (jeffreydunn@depauw.edu) if you plan to attend. Limited funding may be available to defer travel and lodging costs for graduate students who would like to attend the workshop. If interested, please send a short statement of interest and CV to Jeffrey Dunn. Funding: The workshop is made possible by a grant from the British Academy and the Leverhulme Trust, and supported by the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science at LSE, University of Kent, and DePauw University.

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News source: Certain Doubts

Reminder: 8/31 Deadline for 2 Prizes in Philosophy of Religion

The sidebar has an ad for the Sanders Prize for scholars 15 years or less from their PhD. The same competition includes a separate prize for graduate students. The Sanders Prize pays $10,000 and the
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The sidebar has an ad for the Sanders Prize for scholars 15 years or less from their PhD. The same competition includes a separate prize for graduate students. The Sanders Prize pays $10,000 and the grad student prize $3000. Yes, it is possible for one entry to win both. Deadline: August 31, 2014. (Entries sent to me as an email attachment; pdf documents, please.)

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News source: Certain Doubts

Reminder: 8/31 Deadline for 2 Prizes in Philosophy of Religion

The Sanders Prize is for scholars 15 years or less from their PhD. The same competition includes a separate prize for graduate students. The Sanders Prize pays $10,000 and the grad student prize
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The Sanders Prize is for scholars 15 years or less from their PhD. The same competition includes a separate prize for graduate students. The Sanders Prize pays $10,000 and the grad student prize $3000. Yes, it is possible for one entry to win both. Deadline: August 31, 2014. (Entries sent to me as an email…

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News source: The Prosblogion

Do some inductions require a necessary first cause?

Suppose that we’ve observed a dozen randomly chosen ravens and they’re all black. We (cautiously) make the obvious inference that all ravens are black. But then we find out that
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Suppose that we’ve observed a dozen randomly chosen ravens and they’re all black. We (cautiously) make the obvious inference that all ravens are black. But then we find out that regardless of parental color, newly conceived raven embryos have a 50% chance of being black and a 50% chance of being white, and that they…

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News source: The Prosblogion

Digital Cosmopolitans

Ethan Zuckerman wants to combat provincialism in the digital age. How? Perhaps the rise of the e-flâneur is in order…
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Ethan Zuckerman wants to combat provincialism in the digital age. How? Perhaps the rise of the e-flâneur is in order… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Roger Scruton’s leap of faith

In the face of fatalism and pessimism, Roger Scruton is Sisyphus. His rock is still rolling, his search for transcendence goes on…
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In the face of fatalism and pessimism, Roger Scruton is Sisyphus. His rock is still rolling, his search for transcendence goes on… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

New Scholasticism Meets Analytic Philosophy

2014.08.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rafael Hüntelmann and Johannes Hattler (eds.), New Scholasticism Meets Analytic Philosophy, Editiones Scholasticae, 2014, 128pp.,
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2014.08.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rafael Hüntelmann and Johannes Hattler (eds.), New Scholasticism Meets Analytic Philosophy, Editiones Scholasticae, 2014, 128pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9783868385458. Reviewed by Anna Marmodoro, University of Oxford This volume contributes to the exciting international conversations that are currently developing among metaphysicians of different ‘affiliations’: (neo-)Aristotelians and (neo-)Thomists on the one hand, and analytic philosophers on the other. This dialogue is important. Aristotle’s and Aquinas’ texts, when approached from a contemporary philosophical perspective, may well offer significant insights that a merely textual/historical reading might not bring out. Scholars and philosophers alike have much to gain from such an exercise. To my mind, Rafael Hüntelmann and Johannes Hattler, the editors, make too limited a claim when suggesting in their preface that the ‘formal similarities’ between. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Nature's Suit: Husserl's Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences

2014.08.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Lee Hardy, Nature's Suit: Husserl's Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences, Ohio University Press, 2013, 248pp., $
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2014.08.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Lee Hardy, Nature's Suit: Husserl's Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences, Ohio University Press, 2013, 248pp., $ 34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780821420669. Reviewed by Michele Averchi, The Catholic University of America Lee Hardy argues that Husserl's phenomenology is compatible with scientific realism. Scientific realism holds that scientific theories provide a true description of the world, while scientific instrumentalism holds that scientific theories are mere devices for predictions about the behavior of things. A crucial question for this debate is the ontological status of unobservable entities, such as the law of universal gravitation. What is it, exactly? The realist would argue that the law of universal gravitation is a description of a hidden structure of the world, while the instrumentalist would argue that it is just a tool for predictions, with no counterpart in reality. As shown by. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Erotic Art

[New Entry by Hans Maes on August 20, 2014.] What is erotic art? Do all paintings with a sexual theme qualify as erotic? How to distinguish between erotica and erotic art? In what way are aesthetic
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[New Entry by Hans Maes on August 20, 2014.] What is erotic art? Do all paintings with a sexual theme qualify as erotic? How to distinguish between erotica and erotic art? In what way are aesthetic experiences related to, or different from, erotic experiences and are they at all compatible? Both people and works of art can be sensually appealing, but is the beauty in each case...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Mele & Nahmias on Philosophy TV

Al Mele and Eddy Nahmias have an illuminating conversation about the relationship between free will and recent advances in neuroscience and social psychology in the latest episode of Philosophy TV.
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Al Mele and Eddy Nahmias have an illuminating conversation about the relationship between free will and recent advances in neuroscience and social psychology in the latest episode of Philosophy TV. Here is the overview:Mele and Nahmias start by explaining how they first became seriously interested in the relationship of free will to science. Then (12:44) they discuss the infamous Libet experiments, which are often interpreted as evidence that our conscious decisions are determined by earlier nonconscious brain activity, along with a range of other experiments in neuroscience that also bear on issues concerning human free agency. Next (25:31) they consider general worries that underlie neuroscientific investigations of free will. Then (41:28) they discuss whether (and how) results in social psychology could undermine free human agency. After that, they discuss future prospects for scientific investigation of free will (46:14), including Mele’s (exceptionally generous). . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy