Religion Without God

2014.12.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ronald Dworkin, Religion Without God, Harvard University Press, 2013, 180pp., $17.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674726826. Reviewed by
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2014.12.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ronald Dworkin, Religion Without God, Harvard University Press, 2013, 180pp., $17.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674726826. Reviewed by Howard Wettstein, University of California, Riverside Ronald Dworkin has left us a stimulating set of posthumously published reflections about religion. Such variations on religious themes have a long history. Something in Jewish-Christian-Islamic religiosity inspires generalization, or transplantation, or relocation to various metaphysical and even non-metaphysical locales. Dwelling in Psalms, one might experience a sense of depth, of contact with a profound human reality, one that need not be situated in the context of a god. God is -- the gods are -- powerful; metaphorically as well as, for the believer, in a more plain sense. Dworkin speaks of religion without God. Spinoza, a somewhat kindred spirit, did it the other way around: God without religion. Religions are, after all,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Jenny Diski on Doris Lessing

Jenny Diski’s father was a professional con man, her mother an addict. Diski tried suicide – a few times. Then, age 15, she was sheltered by Doris Lessing…
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Jenny Diski’s father was a professional con man, her mother an addict. Diski tried suicide – a few times. Then, age 15, she was sheltered by Doris Lessing… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Graffiti in Roman Pompeii

Graffiti varies from place to place. In New York, it’s gallery-approved. In the Arab world, it’s political. In Pompeii, it was erotic and funny…
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Graffiti varies from place to place. In New York, it’s gallery-approved. In the Arab world, it’s political. In Pompeii, it was erotic and funny… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Inventing the future

Inventing the future. The Victorians told a particular story about culture, technology, and optimism. It still shapes our vision of things to come…
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Inventing the future. The Victorians told a particular story about culture, technology, and optimism. It still shapes our vision of things to come… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Legalism in Chinese Philosophy

[New Entry by Yuri Pines on December 10, 2014.] Legalism is a popular - albeit quite inaccurate - designation of an intellectual current that gained considerable popularity in the latter half of
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[New Entry by Yuri Pines on December 10, 2014.] Legalism is a popular - albeit quite inaccurate - designation of an intellectual current that gained considerable popularity in the latter half of the Warring States period (Zhanguo, 453 - 221 BCE). Legalists were political realists who sought to attain a "rich state with powerful army" and to ensure domestic stability in an age marked by intense inter- and intra-state competition. They believed that human beings - commoners and elites...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Philosophers' Carnival #170

Welcome to the 170th Philosophers' Carnival, a round-up of recent philosophical blog posts from around the web.First up: PEA Soup hosts a discussion of Elizabeth Barnes' paper "Valuing Disability,
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Welcome to the 170th Philosophers' Carnival, a round-up of recent philosophical blog posts from around the web.First up: PEA Soup hosts a discussion of Elizabeth Barnes' paper "Valuing Disability, Causing Disability" -- defending a "mere difference" view of disability -- with critical précis by Tom Dougherty.Jason at Bleeding Heart Libertarians defends the "parity" view that one may kill government agents in self-defense whenever one could permissibly kill a similarly situated civilian.Wo asks whether subjective uncertainty objectively matters.  Performing a risky act that fortunately turns out to do no harm is generally thought by consequentialists to be merely subjectively (not objectively) wrong.  But what should non-consequentialists say about such cases?  Wo offers some very interesting thoughts on the question.Alex at Aesthetics for Birds explores the distinction(s) between "highbrow" and "lowbrow" art and audiences, suggesting that it may just come down to. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

Videos from First Conference

Held in St. Louis, November 13-15, 2014, much of interest to epistemologists. Links below: James Sennett, Brenau University Jonathan Kvanvig, Baylor University Mark Lance, Georgetown University
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Held in St. Louis, November 13-15, 2014, much of interest to epistemologists. Links below: James Sennett, Brenau University Jonathan Kvanvig, Baylor University Mark Lance, Georgetown University Meghan Page, Baylor University Sam Lebens, Rutgers University, Center for Philosophy of Religion Mike Shaffer, St. Cloud State University Dan Howard-Snyder, Western Washington University Dan McKaughan, Boston College Ryan Preston-Roedder, University of North Carolina

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News source: Certain Doubts »

Results of my survey on religious disagreement

Religious disagreements are conspicuous in everyday life.  Most societies, except perhaps for theocracies or theocracy-like regimes, show a diversity of religious beliefs, a diversity that young
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Religious disagreements are conspicuous in everyday life.  Most societies, except perhaps for theocracies or theocracy-like regimes, show a diversity of religious beliefs, a diversity that young children already are aware of. One emerging topic of interest in the social epistemology of religion is how we should respond to religious disagreement. How should you react if you are [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

The Failure of Rolling Stone

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/465778117 In November, 2014 the Rolling Stone magazine received worldwide attention for a story on the brutal gang rape of a student at the University of Virginia.
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http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/465778117 In November, 2014 the Rolling Stone magazine received worldwide attention for a story on the brutal gang rape of a student at the University of Virginia. The story had a significant impact not only on the University of Virginia but also on the broader community. Some accepted the story as true—after all, it was a horrifying example of the rape culture that had become part of a general media narrative. Others had doubts about the story—some for ideological reasons and some for what turned out to be legitimate reasons. It turns out that the story is largely (or even entirely) untrue and Rolling Stone issued an apology to its readers. In preparing and printing this story about the rape of a woman nicknamed Jackie, the relevant people at the Rolling Stone failed both professionally and morally. In investigating the story, the Rolling Stone did not contact the men alleged to be involved in the attack. This seems rather contrary to what should. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Language After Heidegger

2014.12.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Krzysztof Ziarek, Language After Heidegger, Indiana University Press, 2013, 243pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780253011015.
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2014.12.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Krzysztof Ziarek, Language After Heidegger, Indiana University Press, 2013, 243pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780253011015. Reviewed by Thomas Sheehan, Stanford University The first problem in addressing the topic of Heidegger and language is Heidegger’s own language, especially from 1936 on, when his technical terms and rhetoric become especially idiosyncratic. First of all, Heidegger maddeningly gives common terms uncommon meanings, and does so without notice — for example, “Ereignis” does not mean “event” as it does in ordinary German, and “Dasein” doesn’t mean existence. Second, Heidegger was scandalously inconsistent in the ever-changing meanings he gave to his key term “Sein” and to its older spelling, “Seyn.” And third, the more opaque his language becomes (“the world worlds,” “the nothing nothings”), the less he seems to offer evidence, much less justification, for his apparently far-fetched claims. This. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News