Is there a place for the virtues courage, contemplation, and compassion in a <strong>culture of debunking realism</strong>? Such a question is in danger of dropping off the map of human inquiry

Is there a place for the virtues courage, contemplation, and compassion in a culture of debunking realism? Such a question is in danger of dropping off the map of human
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Is there a place for the virtues courage, contemplation, and compassion in a culture of debunking realism? Such a question is in danger of dropping off the map of human inquiry

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

We are <strong>doomed by mass idiocy</strong>, half-wit artists, and obscurantist academics. Intellectual life as we once knew it is dead. Or so says Mario Vargas Llosa

We are doomed by mass idiocy, half-wit artists, and obscurantist academics. Intellectual life as we once knew it is dead. Or so says Mario Vargas
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We are doomed by mass idiocy, half-wit artists, and obscurantist academics. Intellectual life as we once knew it is dead. Or so says Mario Vargas Llosa

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Tom Friedman vs. Bill Flack. One is a noted columnist, the other an irrigation specialist. One is an expert, the other a nobody. Yet Flack is better at <strong>forecasting the future</strong>

Tom Friedman vs. Bill Flack. One is a noted columnist, the other an irrigation specialist. One is an expert, the other a nobody. Yet Flack is better at forecasting the
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Tom Friedman vs. Bill Flack. One is a noted columnist, the other an irrigation specialist. One is an expert, the other a nobody. Yet Flack is better at forecasting the future

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Victims and Victimhood

2015.08.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Trudy Govier,&#160;Victims and Victimhood, Broadview, 2015, 232pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781554810994. Reviewed by Gary Watson,
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2015.08.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Trudy Govier, Victims and Victimhood, Broadview, 2015, 232pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781554810994. Reviewed by Gary Watson, University of Southern California The project of this book is to bring the ideas of victim and victimhood into the philosophical foreground. Certain cognate notions, such as those of wrong-doer, responsibility, and forgiveness, are subjects of vast literatures. In contrast, the notions of the title have themselves remained in the periphery, as though they were of little interest or well enough understood. Trudy Govier's sense is that there is "much to be gained" by bringing to light, and to philosophical scrutiny, the definitional, moral, and public policy issues that arise from discourse on victims and victimhood. The chapters range eclectically from the problems of allowing victims their voices and properly hearing what they have to say (Chapters 4-7), to the hazards of cultivating. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Judgmentalism vs Non-commitalism

Call Non-commitalism the view that we sometimes ought to suspend belief, assign imprecise credences spanning the entire interval [0,1], or otherwise refrain from doxastic commitment.Opposing this,
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Call Non-commitalism the view that we sometimes ought to suspend belief, assign imprecise credences spanning the entire interval [0,1], or otherwise refrain from doxastic commitment.Opposing this, we have Judgmentalism, the view that we're never required to suspend judgment: there's always some doxastic commitment or other that we could at least as reasonably hold.We might go further and consider Strong Judgmentalism, the view that there is always some doxastic commitment (e.g. some level of credence) that's rationally superior to suspending judgment entirely.Which of these views is most plausible?  And (for any epistemologists in the audience) is there any existing literature on the topic?  (I just made up these names, so they might go by different labels if so...)I find myself drawn to Strong Judgmentalism, but would settle for defending Judgmentalism against Non-commitalism.  I see three main routes to doing so:(1) Co-opt existing arguments. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

For Montaigne, the three finest things in life are <strong>friendship, sex, and reading</strong>. The best? Reading. Your friend may die, your sexual partner may betray you, but literature is always there

For Montaigne, the three finest things in life are friendship, sex, and reading. The best? Reading. Your friend may die, your sexual partner may betray you, but literature is always
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For Montaigne, the three finest things in life are friendship, sex, and reading. The best? Reading. Your friend may die, your sexual partner may betray you, but literature is always there

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Ontology and Metaontology: A Contemporary Guide

2015.08.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Francesco Berto and Matteo Plebani,&#160;Ontology and Metaontology: A Contemporary Guide, Bloomsbury, 2015, 200pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN
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2015.08.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Francesco Berto and Matteo Plebani, Ontology and Metaontology: A Contemporary Guide, Bloomsbury, 2015, 200pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781441182890. Reviewed by Bradley Rettler, Baylor University Francesco Berto and Matteo Plebani's book is a guide to the topics in its title. The book is composed of three parts: Quinean Metaontology, Alternative Metaontologies, and Ontology. The first two take up roughly the first half of the book (pp. 1-119), and the last part takes up the remaining half (pp. 121-228). Quinean metaontology is divided into three chapters: 1) On Denoting, 2) 1948: On What There Is, and 3) The Standard View. Alternative Metaontologies is divided into five chapters: 4) Ontological Pluralism and Neo-Fregeanism, 5) Carnap's View of Ontology and Neo-Carnapians, 6) Fictionalism, 7) Meinongianism, and 8) The Grounding Approach. Ontology is divided into six chapters: 9) Abstract Objects I: Numbers and. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

According to Montaigne, the three top things in life are <strong>friendship, sex, and reading</strong>. What's best? Reading. Your friend may die, your sexual partner may betray you, but literature is always there

According to Montaigne, the three top things in life are friendship, sex, and reading. What&#39;s best? Reading. Your friend may die, your sexual partner may betray you, but literature is always
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According to Montaigne, the three top things in life are friendship, sex, and reading. What's best? Reading. Your friend may die, your sexual partner may betray you, but literature is always there

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The culture wars are over, <strong>long live the culture wars</strong>! On the internet, new participants battle on. Has it all become an ideological sideshow?

The culture wars are over, long live the culture wars! On the internet, new participants battle on. Has it all become an ideological
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The culture wars are over, long live the culture wars! On the internet, new participants battle on. Has it all become an ideological sideshow?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Joan Didion&rsquo;s anti-journalism</strong>. She disliked interviews, did little reporting, and failed to "get" the story. Her brilliance came another way &mdash; close reading

Joan Didion&amp;rsquo;s anti-journalism. She disliked interviews, did little reporting, and failed to &quot;get&quot; the story. Her brilliance came another way &amp;mdash; close
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Joan Didion’s anti-journalism. She disliked interviews, did little reporting, and failed to "get" the story. Her brilliance came another way — close reading

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily