Ineffability and its Metaphysics: The Unspeakable in Art, Religion, and Philosophy

2016.06.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Silvia Jonas, Ineffability and its Metaphysics: The Unspeakable in Art, Religion, and Philosophy, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016,
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2016.06.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Silvia Jonas, Ineffability and its Metaphysics: The Unspeakable in Art, Religion, and Philosophy, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 226pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781137579546. Reviewed by Keith Ward, Heythrop College, University of London This is a very ambitious book. Silvia Jonas sets out to articulate 'a common ground for any account of the metaphysics of ineffability'. She defines the ineffable as a nonlinguistic item which it is in principle impossible to express in conceptual terms or to communicate to others by the use of language. She is particularly interested in the uses of the term 'ineffable' in religious, aesthetic, and philosophical contexts, where it seems to mark something of special importance or significance, and she aims to provide a basic account that will illuminate both these and many other sorts of talk about ineffability in literature. The book is difficult, because it deals with many. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

CFP: 1st Midwest Experimental and Theoretical Association Conference

Many contemporary experimental philosophers endorse a broad conception of experimental philosophy according to which one is doing experimental philosophy whenever one uses empirical methods and
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Many contemporary experimental philosophers endorse a broad conception of experimental philosophy according to which one is doing experimental philosophy whenever one uses empirical methods and techniques to help investigate philosophical questions. Other experimental philosophers -- and many critics of experimental philosophy -- have assumed a narrower conception and restricted the practice to the empirical study of philosophical intuitions. Often the narrower project is further confined to folk intuitions and the aim of such studies is also narrowly focused on the evidential value of intuitions. We aim to provoke further discussion of the scope of experimental philosophy and to encourage experimental philosophers to consider how we might advance philosophical inquiry without studying intuitions.Therefore, the Midwest Experimental and Theoretical Association invites submissions on the theme, “Beyond Intuition: Experimental Philosophy on the Broad Conception.” Submissions reporting. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

Yes, the humanities are embattled and the sciences are deemed useful. But if science is a way of life and not just a body of knowledge, it needs <strong>liberal education</strong>

Yes, the humanities are embattled and the sciences are deemed useful. But if science is a way of life and not just a body of knowledge, it needs liberal
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Yes, the humanities are embattled and the sciences are deemed useful. But if science is a way of life and not just a body of knowledge, it needs liberal education

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Al-Farabi's Philosophy of Society and Religion

[New Entry by Nadja Germann on June 15, 2016.] While al-Farabi does not have a specific term for &#39;philosophy of religion&#39;, he does in fact have one which can more or less literally be translated as
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[New Entry by Nadja Germann on June 15, 2016.] While al-Farabi does not have a specific term for 'philosophy of religion', he does in fact have one which can more or less literally be translated as 'philosophy of society', namely, falsafa madaniyya.[1] Notably, this notion embraces two chief moments. First, in line with Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, it comprises an intrinsically anthropological and ethical element; accordingly,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Aristotle's Metaphysics

[Revised entry by S. Marc Cohen on June 15, 2016. Changes to: Bibliography] The first major work in the history of philosophy to bear the title &quot;Metaphysics&quot; was the treatise by Aristotle that we
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[Revised entry by S. Marc Cohen on June 15, 2016. Changes to: Bibliography] The first major work in the history of philosophy to bear the title "Metaphysics" was the treatise by Aristotle that we have come to know by that name. But Aristotle himself did not use that title or even describe his field of study as 'metaphysics'; the name was evidently coined by the first century C.E. editor who assembled the treatise we know as Aristotle's Metaphysics out of various smaller selections of Aristotle's works. The title...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

A timeout: the methods of etymology

I expected that my series on dogs would inspire a torrent of angry comments. After all, dog is one of the most enigmatic words in English etymology, but the responses were very few. I am, naturally,
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I expected that my series on dogs would inspire a torrent of angry comments. After all, dog is one of the most enigmatic words in English etymology, but the responses were very few. I am, naturally, grateful to those who found it possible to say something about the subject I was discussing for five weeks, especially to those who liked the essays. As I have observed in the past, though I am supposed to love my enemies, I have a warmer feeling for those who are fond of me.  At the moment, my dogs sleep in relative isolation, and that is where I’ll leave them. But suddenly my rather trivial old post on strawberry was picked up by MSN News, Hacker News, and Reddit, and thousands of people participated in the “chat.” Who could predict those five (three) minutes of evanescent fame? However, I also received a serious private letter. Our correspondent expressed surprise that I constantly refer to onomatopoeia and sound symbolism and asked me to clarify my attitude toward this matter. Summer. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

Knobe Interviewed at Discrimination and Disadvantage

Our very own Joshua Knobe has been interviewed by Shelley Lynn Tremain as part of her Dialogues on Disability series. You can check out the interview over at Discrimination and Disadvantage! So,
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Our very own Joshua Knobe has been interviewed by Shelley Lynn Tremain as part of her Dialogues on Disability series.  You can check out the interview over at Discrimination and Disadvantage! So, please drop by (and share)!

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

Elon Musk suggests that we may all be <strong>living in a simulation</strong>, giving an old idea fresh cachet. But why listen to Musk on such a matter?

Elon Musk suggests that we may all be living in a simulation, giving an old idea fresh cachet. But why listen to Musk on such a
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Elon Musk suggests that we may all be living in a simulation, giving an old idea fresh cachet. But why listen to Musk on such a matter?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The <strong>gene</strong> isn't an eternal thing that awaited elucidation by humans. It's a living idea with ancestors, development, and maturation &mdash; and maybe death

The gene isn&#39;t an eternal thing that awaited elucidation by humans. It&#39;s a living idea with ancestors, development, and maturation &amp;mdash; and maybe
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The gene isn't an eternal thing that awaited elucidation by humans. It's a living idea with ancestors, development, and maturation — and maybe death

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Yes, the humanities are embattled and the sciences are deemed useful. But if science is to become a way of life and not just a body of knowledge, it needs <strong>liberal education</strong>

Yes, the humanities are embattled and the sciences are deemed useful. But if science is to become a way of life and not just a body of knowledge, it needs liberal
Philosophy News image
Yes, the humanities are embattled and the sciences are deemed useful. But if science is to become a way of life and not just a body of knowledge, it needs liberal education

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily