Fast is never fast enough

The cult of speed. The faster we go, it seems, the less time we have. And you’ll never be fast enough. Eventually speed kills..
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The cult of speed. The faster we go, it seems, the less time we have. And you’ll never be fast enough. Eventually speed kills.. more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

History of beer

Babylonians, shamans, monks, farmers, patriots, industrialists: Brewers are an ancient and odd bunch. Every beer tells a story…
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Babylonians, shamans, monks, farmers, patriots, industrialists: Brewers are an ancient and odd bunch. Every beer tells a story… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Evolution and Ethics

T.H. Huxley – Darwin’s “bulldog” – was an eminent scientist, an ardent believer in evolution, and a fierce critic of scientific triumphalism…
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T.H. Huxley – Darwin’s “bulldog” – was an eminent scientist, an ardent believer in evolution, and a fierce critic of scientific triumphalism… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Philosophical Perspectives on Democracy in the 21st Century

2014.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ann E. Cudd and Sally J. Scholz (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Democracy in the 21st Century, Springer, 2014, 246pp.,
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2014.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ann E. Cudd and Sally J. Scholz (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Democracy in the 21st Century, Springer, 2014, 246pp., $129.00 (hbk), ISBN 9783319023113. Reviewed by James Gledhill, The University of Hong Kong The focus of this volume is both narrower and broader than its title might suggest. Originating from the 2012 conference of the American Section of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (AMINTAPHIL), it is predominantly concerned with the current state of democracy in America. And while a number of the chapters take up core philosophical debates in democratic theory, the broad range of perspectives on offer also derive from law and political science, continuing the approach of the AMINTAPHIL book series on the philosophical foundations of law and justice, of which this is the fifth volume. In their introduction, the editors reflect on how global movements such. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

How can we make the subject matter of philosophy of religion more diverse?

In a forthcoming paper, John Schellenberg forwards the following argument: anatomically humans have been around 200,000 years. That’s a very short span of time for any species, and only in the
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In a forthcoming paper, John Schellenberg forwards the following argument: anatomically humans have been around 200,000 years. That’s a very short span of time for any species, and only in the past few thousand years ago have we been reflecting on the world around us. If we our species survives even as long as Homo [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Niccolò Machiavelli

[Revised entry by Cary Nederman on October 20, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Why an entry on Machiavelli? That question might naturally and legitimately occur to anyone encountering
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[Revised entry by Cary Nederman on October 20, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Why an entry on Machiavelli? That question might naturally and legitimately occur to anyone encountering an entry about him in an encyclopedia of philosophy. Certainly, Machiavelli contributed to a large number of important discourses in Western...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Medbots, Autodocs & Telemedicine

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/481844255 In science fiction stories, movies and games automated medical services are quite common. Some take the form of autodocs—essentially an autonomous robotic
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http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/481844255 In science fiction stories, movies and games automated medical services are quite common. Some take the form of autodocs—essentially an autonomous robotic pod that treats the patient within its confines. Medbots, as distinct from the autodoc, are robots that do not enclose the patient, but do their work in a way similar to a traditional doctor or medic. There are also non-robotic options using remote-controlled machines—this would be an advanced form of telemedicine in which the patient can actually be treated remotely. Naturally, robots can be built that can be switched from robotic (autonomous) to remote controlled mode. For example, a medbot might gather data about the patient and then a human doctor might take control to diagnose and treat the patient. One of the main and morally commendable reasons to create medical robots and telemedicine capabilities is to provide treatment to people in areas that do not have enough human medical. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

#Gamergate, Video Game Wars, & Evil

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/106748964 As a gamer, philosopher and human being, I was morally outraged when I learned of the latest death threats against Anita Sarkeesian. Sarkeesian, who is
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http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/106748964 As a gamer, philosopher and human being, I was morally outraged when I learned of the latest death threats against Anita Sarkeesian. Sarkeesian, who is well known as a moral critic of the misogynistic rot defiling gaming, was scheduled to speak at Utah State University. Emails were sent that threatened a mass shooting if her talk was not cancelled. For legal reasons, the University was not able to prevent people from being weapons to the talk, so Sarkeesian elected to cancel her talk because of concerns for the safety of the audience. This incident is just the latest in an ongoing outpouring of threats against women involved in gaming and those who are willing to openly oppose sexism and misogyny in the gaming world (and in the real world). Sadly, this sort of behavior is not surprising and it is part of two larger problems: internet trolling and misogyny. As a philosopher, I am in the habit of arguing for claims. However, there seems to be. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Out from the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy

2014.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sharon L. Crasnow and Anita M. Superson (eds.), Out from the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional
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2014.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sharon L. Crasnow and Anita M. Superson (eds.), Out from the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2012, 545pp., $41.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780199855476.   Reviewed by Samantha Brennan, University of Western Ontario In its early days, the force of feminist philosophy was its powerful criticisms of the philosophical canon and of recent work in mainstream philosophy. Today feminist philosophy has moved past criticism to making positive contributions to philosophy across a wide range of areas. This volume aims to show that this is so in the case of analytic philosophy. Sharon Crasnow and Anita Superson envision their volume marking a new stage in the conversation between analytic philosophy and feminism. Featuring the work of eighteen analytical feminists, this collection highlights contributions feminists have made to problems central to analytic philosophy.. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Charity to those we oppose

I have a couple of old blog posts, one from mid-2008 and the other from early 2010 in which I am highly critical of Australian journalist Guy Rundle. In both cases, I’m quite snarky about
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I have a couple of old blog posts, one from mid-2008 and the other from early 2010 in which I am highly critical of Australian journalist Guy Rundle. In both cases, I’m quite snarky about Rundle – but I’m not going to apologise about either. Neither goes beyond my rather loose standards of civility; the criticisms are of substance in each case; and there is no realistic possibility that even a large number of posts of this level of aggression would tend to intimidate Rundle, someone with considerable cultural influence and easy access to very large platforms. By all means, make up your own mind about that. As for me… these days, my language might be slightly more temperate, but I’m still fairly comfortable, even five or six years later, with the two posts as they stand. So far, so good. Nonetheless, these posts were on subjects that I felt passionately about. In the first case, it was about the heated public debate in Australia during 2008 on the art of. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy