Bonfire of the Humanities

Facts are standard fare for historians, but intellectual fashions are what entices them: nationalism, Marxism, postmodernism, globalization…
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Facts are standard fare for historians, but intellectual fashions are what entices them: nationalism, Marxism, postmodernism, globalization… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Surrounding Free Will: Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience

2015.01.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Alfred R. Mele (ed.), Surrounding Free Will: Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience, Oxford University Press, 2015, 342pp., $65.00
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2015.01.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Alfred R. Mele (ed.), Surrounding Free Will: Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience, Oxford University Press, 2015, 342pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199333950. Reviewed by Neil Levy, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health/Oxford Centre for Neuroethics Over the past decade or so, there has been an increasing interest in scientific approaches and challenges to free will. Spurred initially by experiments that have been claimed to show that conscious will is epiphenomenal, and more latterly by work in social psychology that seemed to indicate that belief in free will is correlated with, and may even be causally involved in, pro-social behavior, there is now a rich body of work on cognitive science and free will. In 2010, in large part in order to encourage work in this vein and philosophical reflection on it, the John Templeton Foundation funded a four-year project on free will, directed by Alfred Mele. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Epistemology in Classical Indian Philosophy

[Revised entry by Stephen Phillips on January 22, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Theory of knowledge, pramāṇa-śāstra, is a rich genre of Sanskrit literature, spanning almost twenty
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[Revised entry by Stephen Phillips on January 22, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Theory of knowledge, pramāṇa-śāstra, is a rich genre of Sanskrit literature, spanning almost twenty centuries, carried out in texts belonging to distinct schools of philosophy. Debate across school occurs especially on epistemological issues, but no author writes on knowledge independently of the sort of metaphysical commitment that defines the various classical systems...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Philosophy of Psychiatry

[Revised entry by Dominic Murphy on January 22, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Philosophical discussions of mental illness fall into three families. First, there are topics that arise
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[Revised entry by Dominic Murphy on January 22, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Philosophical discussions of mental illness fall into three families. First, there are topics that arise when we treat psychiatry as a special science and deal with it using the methods and concepts of philosophy of science. This includes discussion of such issues as explanation, reduction and classification. Second, there are conceptual issues that arise when we try to understand the very idea of mental illness and its ethical and experiential dimensions. Third, there are...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Concepts of Disease and Health

[Revised entry by Dominic Murphy on January 22, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Health and disease are critical concepts in bioethics with far-reaching social and political
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[Revised entry by Dominic Murphy on January 22, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Health and disease are critical concepts in bioethics with far-reaching social and political implications. For instance, any attempt to educate physicians or regulate heath insurance must employ some standards that can be used to assess whether people are ill or not. Concepts of health and disease also connect in interesting ways with issues about function and explanation in philosophy of the biomedical sciences, and theories of well-being in ethics....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

God’s Indifference

I mean to show that, no matter what view you have of the nature of God, and no matter what shape metaphysical space takes, the value or disvalue of a possible world makes no difference at all to
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I mean to show that, no matter what view you have of the nature of God, and no matter what shape metaphysical space takes, the value or disvalue of a possible world makes no difference at all to whether God decides to actualize it. In God’s decision to actualize a world he is completely indifferent [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Absolute and Relational Theories of Space and Motion

[Revised entry by Nick Huggett and Carl Hoefer on January 22, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Since antiquity, natural philosophers have struggled to comprehend the nature
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[Revised entry by Nick Huggett and Carl Hoefer on January 22, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Since antiquity, natural philosophers have struggled to comprehend the nature of three tightly interconnected concepts: space, time, and motion. A proper understanding of motion, in particular, has been seen to be crucial for deciding questions about the natures of space and time, and their interconnections. Since the time of Newton and Leibniz, philosophers' struggles to comprehend these concepts have often appeared to take the form of a dispute between...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Virtues of Happiness: A Theory of the Good Life

2015.01.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Paul Bloomfield, The Virtues of Happiness: A Theory of the Good Life, Oxford University Press, 2014, 253pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2015.01.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Paul Bloomfield, The Virtues of Happiness: A Theory of the Good Life, Oxford University Press, 2014, 253pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199827367. Reviewed by Neera K. Badhwar, University of Oklahoma/George Mason University Paul Bloomfield's book is a welcome addition to the recent literature on virtue and happiness, understood as eudaimonia or a Good Life (10). Happiness in this sense refers to a life that is good for the person living it, as distinct from merely a life filled with happy feelings, or a life that feels fulfilling. Bloomfield's aim is to give a new argument for the ancient claim that virtue is partly constitutive of happiness. His central insight is that happiness requires valuing everything, including oneself and others, at their true worth, and that we are virtuous to the extent that we do. In particular, happiness requires self-respect, and self-respect requires respect for others as ends in. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Reign of the robots

Human cognition in the age of digital automation: “What if the cost of machines that think is people who don’t?”…
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Human cognition in the age of digital automation: “What if the cost of machines that think is people who don’t?”… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Virtue of Scientific Thinking

Science once had moral authority. But today, with scientism resurgent, skepticism reigns. The cost is paid by all of us…
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Science once had moral authority. But today, with scientism resurgent, skepticism reigns. The cost is paid by all of us… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily