Futurologists are always wrong

Futurology is alive and well, though futurologists are almost always wrong. Still we listen, yearning for salvation from our human condition…
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Futurology is alive and well, though futurologists are almost always wrong. Still we listen, yearning for salvation from our human condition… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

How We Hope: A Moral Psychology

2014.04.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adrienne M. Martin, How We Hope: A Moral Psychology, Princeton University Press, 2014, 149pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2014.04.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adrienne M. Martin, How We Hope: A Moral Psychology, Princeton University Press, 2014, 149pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691151526. Reviewed by Erica Lucast Stonestreet, College of St. Benedict/St. John’s University Adrienne Martin’s book is a detailed analysis of an ordinary phenomenon that has not had much attention in recent moral psychology. The account extends the “orthodox” view of hope (as a desire for an outcome together with a belief in the outcome’s possibility) by adding what Martin calls an “incorporation” element: what distinguishes hope from other attitudes is the hopeful person’s incorporating the desire into her agency as a reason for hopeful activities. Her treatment seriously engages many historical and contemporary views of hope, ultimately aligning most closely with Kantian ideas of moral psychology. Her motivating challenge to the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Hannah Arendt

[Revised entry by Maurizio Passerin d'Entreves on April 10, 2014. Changes to: Bibliography] Hannah Arendt (1906 - 1975) was one of the most influential political philosophers of the twentieth
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[Revised entry by Maurizio Passerin d'Entreves on April 10, 2014. Changes to: Bibliography] Hannah Arendt (1906 - 1975) was one of the most influential political philosophers of the twentieth century. Born into a German-Jewish family, she was forced to leave Germany in 1933 and lived in Paris for the next eight years, working for a number of Jewish refugee organisations. In 1941 she immigrated to the United States and soon became part of a lively intellectual circle in New York. She held a...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Question about Logic, Philosophy - Stephen Maitzen responds

How important is the study of logic in philosophy, independent of any one particular philosopher or school of philosophy? Is 'logic' considered a 'neutral' subject about which 'everyone' agrees?
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How important is the study of logic in philosophy, independent of any one particular philosopher or school of philosophy? Is 'logic' considered a 'neutral' subject about which 'everyone' agrees? or are there some contentious issues about what 'kind' of 'logic' applies in different kinds of situations? Response from: Stephen Maitzen I'd answer your three questions as follows. (1) Very important. (2) No: There are lively disagreements in logic concerning particular issues, and there may be few if any issues in logic on which everyone agrees. (3) Some philosophers say that different situations call for different kinds of logic. For what it's worth, I disagree: I'm not persuaded that there are any situations in which standard (or "classical") logic doesn't apply.

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

On Lars von Trier’s MELANCHOLIA: A new article of mine offering a ‘therapeutic’ ‘reading’ thereof

My latest film-as-philosophy effort has just been published, with SEQUENCE:
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My latest film-as-philosophy effort has just been published, with SEQUENCE: http://reframe.sussex.ac.uk/sequence1/1-2-an-allegory-of-a-therapeutic-reading/

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Prostitution and the Left

Prostitution used to be a bad thing – degrading, retrograde and to be opposed. Now sex work is just another service job, like being a waitress…
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Prostitution used to be a bad thing – degrading, retrograde and to be opposed. Now sex work is just another service job, like being a waitress… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

On e.e.cummings

Once among the most popular poets in America, e.e. cummings, the man Ezra Pound called “Whitman’s one living descendant,” is rarely read today…
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Once among the most popular poets in America, e.e. cummings, the man Ezra Pound called “Whitman’s one living descendant,” is rarely read today… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Legend of Vera Nabokov

Every writer wants a Vera – Vera Nabokov, who was cook, confidante, teaching assistant, editor, scheduler, and much more to her husband, Vladimir…
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Every writer wants a Vera – Vera Nabokov, who was cook, confidante, teaching assistant, editor, scheduler, and much more to her husband, Vladimir… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Stiegler and Technics

2014.04.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christina Howells and Gerald Moore (eds.), Stiegler and Technics, Edinburgh University Press, 2013, 296pp., $40.00 (pbk),
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2014.04.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christina Howells and Gerald Moore (eds.), Stiegler and Technics, Edinburgh University Press, 2013, 296pp., $40.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780748677023.   Reviewed by Peter Gratton, Memorial University of Newfoundland This book is one of the most important collections published in Continental philosophy this year, bringing together many important thinkers to produce excellent forays into aesthetics, the nature of the self after deconstruction, political economy, and post-Freudian notions of desire. That this is done while encountering the work of Bernard Stiegler amounts to a certain irony for me. I have reviewed Stiegler's work here before and have been critical of it for among other reasons: (a) his prose is needlessly verbose and makes great claims for its import, yet no one would think it all that radical, for example, to argue that humanity as such broke off from evolution with. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Chinese Room Argument

[Revised entry by David Cole on April 9, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The argument and thought-experiment now generally known as the Chinese Room Argument was first published in a
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[Revised entry by David Cole on April 9, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The argument and thought-experiment now generally known as the Chinese Room Argument was first published in a paper in 1980 by American philosopher John Searle (1932- ). It has become one of the best-known arguments in recent philosophy. Searle imagines himself alone in a room following a computer program for responding to Chinese characters slipped under the door. Searle understands nothing of Chinese, and yet, by following the program for manipulating symbols and numerals...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy