9th International Critical Theory Conference of Rome

Conference Name: 9th International Critical Theory Conference of Rome Conference Dates: May 5-7, 2016 Submission Deadline: 02/29/2016 Location: Rome,
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Conference Name: 9th International Critical Theory Conference of Rome Conference Dates: May 5-7, 2016 Submission Deadline: 02/29/2016 Location: Rome, Italy Flyer: https://apaonline.site-ym.com/CALL_FOR_PAPER2016.pdf

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News source: Events

Chomsky and Moral Philosophy

Some experimental philosophers might be interested in "Chomsky and Moral Philosophy," a new paper I recently posted on SSRN. It will appear in the second edition of The Cambridge Companion to
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Some experimental philosophers might be interested in "Chomsky and Moral Philosophy," a new paper I recently posted on SSRN.   It will appear in the second edition of The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky (J. McGilvray, ed), which is due out later this year.  Here is the abstract:Every great philosopher has important things to say about moral philosophy. Chomsky is no exception. Chomsky’s remarks on this topic, however, are not systematic. Instead, they consist mainly of brief and occasional asides. Although often provocative, they tend to come across as digressions from his central focus on linguistics and related disciplines, such as epistemology, philosophy of language, and philosophy of mind. Perhaps as a result, moral philosophers have paid relatively little attention to Chomsky over the past sixty years.This neglect is unfortunate. Chomsky’s insights into the nature and origin of human morality are fundamental and penetrating. They address deep philosophical problems that have. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

University of New Mexico's Annual Philosophy Graduate Student Conference

Conference Name: University of New Mexico’s Annual Philosophy Graduate Student Conference Conference Dates: April 29–30, 2016 Submission Deadline: February 3, 2016 Location: University of New
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Conference Name: University of New Mexico’s Annual Philosophy Graduate Student Conference Conference Dates: April 29–30, 2016 Submission Deadline: February 3, 2016 Location: University of New Mexico Flyer: New Mexico Grad Conferrence

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News source: Events

Science of Consciousness

Conference Name: Science of Consciousness Conference Dates: April 24-30, 2016 Submission Deadline: N/A Location: Tuscon, Arizona Website: www.consciousness.arizona.edu
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Conference Name: Science of Consciousness Conference Dates: April 24-30, 2016 Submission Deadline: N/A Location: Tuscon, Arizona Website: www.consciousness.arizona.edu     

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News source: Events

Reasons for Action: Justification, Motivation, Explanation

[Revised entry by Maria Alvarez on April 24, 2016. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Maria Alvarez replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.] Why are
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[Revised entry by Maria Alvarez on April 24, 2016. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Maria Alvarez replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.] Why are you always lying? Why did the Ancient Egyptians mummify their dead? Should Huck Finn have turned Jim in? Why is she selling her car? Questions that ask for reasons, and in particular, reasons for action,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Is Buddhism paradoxical?

Buddhist literature is full of statements that sound paradoxical. This has led to the widespread idea that Buddhism, like some other religions, wants to point us in the direction of a reality
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Buddhist literature is full of statements that sound paradoxical. In Mahāyāna sūtras, for instance, we repeatedly find claims of the form, “x is not x, therefore it is x.” This has led to the widespread idea that Buddhism, like some other religions, wants to point us in the direction of a reality transcending all intellectual understanding. But while this view of Buddhist thought may be common, it is rejected by most Buddhist thinkers. For it puts Buddhist teachings perilously close to Advaita Vedānta, the Indian school that claims that ultimately all is One. It also calls into question the idea that the Buddha taught the truth when he said that the cause of suffering is ignorance about impermanence and non-self. So for the Madhyamaka school, for instance, the point of the paradoxical-sounding statements is just to get us to stop engaging in metaphysical theorizing. I have long favored this anti-metaphysical (or “semantic”) interpretation of Madhyamaka. This is what I had in mind when. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Hiddenness of God

[New Entry by Daniel Howard-Snyder and Adam Green on April 23, 2016.] "Divine hiddenness", as the phrase suggests, refers, most fundamentally, to the hiddenness of God, i.e., the alleged fact that
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[New Entry by Daniel Howard-Snyder and Adam Green on April 23, 2016.] "Divine hiddenness", as the phrase suggests, refers, most fundamentally, to the hiddenness of God, i.e., the alleged fact that God is hidden, absent, silent. In religious literature, there is a long history of expressions of annoyance, anxiety, and despair over divine hiddenness, so understood. For example, ancient Hebrew texts lament God's failure to show up in experience or to show proper regard for God's people or some particular person, and two Christian Gospels portray Jesus, in his cry of dereliction on the...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The shambolic life of ‘shambles’

You just lost your job. Your partner broke up with you. You’re late on rent. Then, you dropped your iPhone in the toilet. “My life’s in shambles!” you shout. Had you so exclaimed, say, in an
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You just lost your job. Your partner broke up with you. You’re late on rent. Then, you dropped your iPhone in the toilet. “My life’s in shambles!” you shout. Had you so exclaimed, say, in an Anglo-Saxon village over 1,000 years ago, your fellow Old English speakers may have given you a puzzled look. “Your life’s in footstools?” they’d ask. “And what’s an iPhone?” Some centuries later, had you cried out your despair in Chaucer’s London, your Middle English-speaking compatriots may have given you some sympathy: “Yup, the meat market is a tough trade”. See, the word shambles has really changed over the years. Chaos, omnishambles, and chairs Today, shambles conveys a state of ‘confusion’ or ‘chaos’ – or a ‘hot mess’, more colloquially. The word enjoyed some special attention back in 2012. Then, Oxford Dictionaries named omnishambles – first used by Malcolm Tucker in the BBC’s The Thick of It – as its UK Word of the Year. The coinage later inspired the Twitter hashtag #RomneyShambles,. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

What we talk about when we talk about being disoriented

Disorientations—major life experiences that make it difficult for individuals to know how to go on—are deeply familiar, in part because they are common. It is rare to have never experienced some
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Disorientations—major life experiences that make it difficult for individuals to know how to go on—are deeply familiar, in part because they are so common. It is rare to have never experienced some form of disorientation in one’s own life, perhaps in response to grief, illness, or other significant events. What could we notice if we reflected on our everyday conversations about being disoriented? We will notice different things about disorientations depending on, among other things, who we talk to about them, what kinds of relationships we have with these people, and when we have these conversations. The information we get from these conversations won’t conclusively determine what counts as a disorientation, nor will it tell us how disorientations affect all people. Even so, reflecting on what conversations about disorientation are like may point to interesting and important questions about disorientation that could be taken up in future philosophical and psychological. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Essays convey observations and emotions, experiences unique to the writer. So what is the <strong>essayist&rsquo;s obligation to fact</strong>?

Essays convey observations and emotions, experiences unique to the writer. So what is the essayist&amp;rsquo;s obligation to
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Essays convey observations and emotions, experiences unique to the writer. So what is the essayist’s obligation to fact?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily