<strong>Philip Larkin's photographs</strong>. He picked up a camera as a child, and the images &mdash;&nbsp;striking, sensitive, emotion-filled &mdash;&nbsp;send us back to the poems with new eyes

Philip Larkin&#39;s photographs. He picked up a camera as a child, and the images &amp;mdash;&amp;nbsp;striking, sensitive, emotion-filled &amp;mdash;&amp;nbsp;send us back to the poems with new
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Philip Larkin's photographs. He picked up a camera as a child, and the images — striking, sensitive, emotion-filled — send us back to the poems with new eyes

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Coetzee’s Dialogues: Who says who we are?

Throughout his career, J. M Coetzee has been centrally preoccupied with how to tell the truth of an individual life, most of all, how to find the appropriate narrator and fictional genre. Many of
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Throughout his career, J. M. Coetzee has been centrally preoccupied with how to tell the truth of an individual life, most of all, how to find the appropriate narrator and fictional genre. Many of his 15 novels disclose first person narrators in a confessional mode, and so it is not altogether surprising that his latest book is a dialogue with a psychoanalytic psychotherapist, in which they explore together notions of self-hood, repression, disclosure and the nature of communication. It is as if Coetzee has spent a lifetime attempting to answer Samuel Beckett’s question: “Who is this saying it’s me?” As Coetzee and Arabella Kurtz’s Exchanges on Truth, Fiction, and Psychotherapy becomes an extended written conversation, The Good Story follows many boundary lines between self and other, truth and fiction, memory, confession, and self-construction. Kurtz is a sympathetic and perceptive reader of fiction; Coetzee has no professional knowledge of psychotherapy, but from inside. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Data Ethics

Job List:&amp;nbsp; Americas Name of institution:&amp;nbsp; University of Washington, Information
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Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
University of Washington, Information School
Town: 
Seattle
Country: 
USA. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

<strong>Philip Larkin's photographs</strong>. He picked up a camera as a child, and the images -- striking, sensitive, emotion-filled -- send us back to the poems with new eyes

Philip Larkin&#39;s photographs. He picked up a camera as a child, and the images -- striking, sensitive, emotion-filled -- send us back to the poems with new
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Philip Larkin's photographs. He picked up a camera as a child, and the images -- striking, sensitive, emotion-filled -- send us back to the poems with new eyes

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Literary biography meets the anecdote-proof life. <strong>Wallace Stevens</strong> loved long walks, gifts from Ceylon, and persimmons. Does knowing that help us understand his poetry?

Literary biography meets the anecdote-proof life. Wallace Stevens loved long walks, gifts from Ceylon, and persimmons. Does knowing that help us understand his
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Literary biography meets the anecdote-proof life. Wallace Stevens loved long walks, gifts from Ceylon, and persimmons. Does knowing that help us understand his poetry?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Can an insidious artifact of Hitler be neutralized by a phalanx of footnotes and annotations? Here comes a new critical edition of <em><strong>Mein</strong> Kampf</em>

Can an insidious artifact of Hitler be neutralized by a phalanx of footnotes and annotations? Here comes a new critical edition of Mein
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Can an insidious artifact of Hitler be neutralized by a phalanx of footnotes and annotations? Here comes a new critical edition of Mein Kampf

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Plotinus: Myth, Metaphor, and Philosophical Practice

2016.09.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stephen R.L. Clark, Plotinus: Myth, Metaphor, and Philosophical Practice, University of Chicago Press, 2016, 344pp., $55.00
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2016.09.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stephen R.L. Clark, Plotinus: Myth, Metaphor, and Philosophical Practice, University of Chicago Press, 2016, 344pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226339672. Reviewed by Michael Chase, CNRS Centre Jean Pépin This is a bold work that applies a new approach to the interpretation of the thought of the founder of Neoplatonism. It is not a systematic historical study of Plotinus, nor an analysis of his arguments, but an attempt, as the author writes, to show how Plotinus would have us live here-now, and what the world of our experience might seem if we reformed our wills and imagination, whether or not the universe is as he argued that it was. Even his most metaphysical utterances can be given a therapeutic and this-worldly meaning. (p. 297) Stephen R.L. Clark intends, moreover, to try "to develop and check [Plotinus'] texts against our own experience of the world and the evidence of other -- seemingly similar... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Genetic Drift

[New Entry by Roberta L. Millstein on September 15, 2016.] In the 1950s, a lively debate broke out among biologists that continues to this day, over what might seem like the most unlikely of
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[New Entry by Roberta L. Millstein on September 15, 2016.] In the 1950s, a lively debate broke out among biologists that continues to this day, over what might seem like the most unlikely of organisms: the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis. Yet, there are in fact some interesting aspects to C. nemoralis. This species of snail is polymorphic; the snail's shell varies in color (pink, brown, and yellow) as well as the number of visible bands (anywhere from 0 - 5). But the colors and bands are not equally distributed across populations. In some populations, pink...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Maurice Merleau-Ponty

[Revised entry by Ted Toadvine on September 14, 2016. Changes to: 0] [Editor&#39;s Note: The following new entry by Ted Toadvine replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous
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[Revised entry by Ted Toadvine on September 14, 2016. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Ted Toadvine replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.]...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Policebot Profiling

Embed from Getty Images In 2016 the Dallas police used a remotely operated robot to kill a suspect with a bomb. While this marked a new use for robots in the realm of domestic policing, the decision
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Embed from Getty Images In 2016 the Dallas police used a remotely operated robot to kill a suspect with a bomb. While this marked a new use for robots in the realm of domestic policing, the decision making process was entirely conventional. That is, humans decided to use the machine and then a human operator controlled it for the attack. As such a true policebot is still a thing of science fiction. That said, considering policebots provides an interesting way to discuss police profiling in a speculative setting. While it might be objected that the discussion should focus on real police profiling, there are advantages to discussing controversial matters within a speculative context. One important advantage is that such a setting can help dampen emotional responses and enable a more rational discussion. The speculative context helps make the discussion less threatening to some who might react with greater hostility to discussions focused on the actual world. Star Trek’s discussion. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy