Thomas Reid

[Revised entry by Ryan Nichols and Gideon Yaffe on September 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Thomas Reid (1710 - 1796) is a Scottish philosopher best known for his philosophical
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Ryan Nichols and Gideon Yaffe on September 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Thomas Reid (1710 - 1796) is a Scottish philosopher best known for his philosophical method, his theory of perception and its wide implications on epistemology, and as the developer and defender of an agent-causal theory of free will. In these and other areas he offers...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Doctrine of Double Effect

[Revised entry by Alison McIntyre on September 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The doctrine (or principle) of double effect is often invoked to explain the permissibility of an
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Alison McIntyre on September 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The doctrine (or principle) of double effect is often invoked to explain the permissibility of an action that causes a serious harm, such as the death of a human being, as a side effect of promoting some good end. According to the principle of double effect, sometimes it is...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Why Do Experiments?

On psychologist Simine Vazire's always-excellent blog, sometimes i'm wrong, there is an excerpt from John Doris's forthcoming book that reacts to #repligate. Doris makes many important points about
Philosophy News image
On psychologist Simine Vazire's always-excellent blog, sometimes i'm wrong, there is an excerpt from John Doris's forthcoming book that reacts to #repligate. Doris makes many important points about how philosophers should respond to this episode in psychology, such as not relying too much on any single study, including any single replication.However, I want to take issue with one parenthetical remark. Doris writes "(Less cynically: if scientific findings weren’t surprising, why would we need experiments and publications?)". Although this may just be a throwaway remark for Doris, I actually think it might be a somewhat common thought. The thought is that experiments get some of their value from surprisingness -- i.e. disconfirming some intuitive thought. Or, put it in the reverse direction, if people were able to reliably predict whether an experiment would confirm or disconfirm a commonsense belief, then there would be less reason for us to do such an experiment.I don't think that's. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Experimental Philosophy

What Are the Humanities For?

Defending the defenders of the humanities. Apologist arguments do them and their cause little good. But it’s not their fault…
Philosophy News image
Defending the defenders of the humanities. Apologist arguments do them and their cause little good. But it’s not their fault… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Not so foolish

Behavioral economics has taught us to be wary of our own cognitive biases. But placing too much faith in our own irrationality is itself irrational…
Philosophy News image
Behavioral economics has taught us to be wary of our own cognitive biases. But placing too much faith in our own irrationality is itself irrational… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Donald Antrim and the Art of Anxiety

Donald Antrim, chronically underrated, had a year of recognition, which he calls “a very unexpected occurrence.” He didn’t expect to still be alive…
Philosophy News image
Donald Antrim, chronically underrated, had a year of recognition, which he calls “a very unexpected occurrence.” He didn’t expect to still be alive… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century

2014.09.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press, 2014, 650pp.,
Philosophy News image
2014.09.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press, 2014, 650pp., $150.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199594474. Reviewed by Jeremy Dunham, University of Sheffield This volume is a hugely important contribution to scholarship on nineteenth-century philosophy. When assessing an average 'Oxford Handbook' we would often judge it on how well it orientates the reader to current scholarship on the particular subject. However, for many important aspects of British philosophy in the nineteenth century the scholarship is almost non-existent. As W. J. Mander rightly notes in the introduction, when we hear a reference to nineteenth-century philosophy, we are far more likely to think of 'the great systems of continental thought' than the British tradition. Nonetheless, this volume aims to show that this tradition boasts a remarkably rich and varied range of. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Intellectual Property

[Revised entry by Adam Moore and Ken Himma on September 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Intellectual property is generally characterized as non-physical property that is the product
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Adam Moore and Ken Himma on September 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Intellectual property is generally characterized as non-physical property that is the product of original thought. Typically, rights do not surround the abstract non-physical entity; rather, intellectual property rights surround the control of physical manifestations or...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Al-Ghazali

[Revised entry by Frank Griffel on September 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Al-Ghazali (c.1056 - 1111) was one of the most prominent and influential philosophers, theologians,
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Frank Griffel on September 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Al-Ghazali (c.1056 - 1111) was one of the most prominent and influential philosophers, theologians, jurists, and mystics of Sunni Islam. He was active at a time when Sunni theology had just passed through its consolidation and entered a period of intense...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The History of Utilitarianism

[Revised entry by Julia Driver on September 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Utilitarianism is one of the most powerful and persuasive approaches to normative ethics in the history
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Julia Driver on September 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Utilitarianism is one of the most powerful and persuasive approaches to normative ethics in the history of philosophy. Though not fully articulated until the 19th century, proto-utilitarian positions can be discerned throughout the history of ethical...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy