The Repugnant Conclusion

[Revised entry by Gustaf Arrhenius, Jesper Ryberg, and Torbjörn Tännsjö on January 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] In Derek Parfit's original formulation the Repugnant Conclusion is
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[Revised entry by Gustaf Arrhenius, Jesper Ryberg, and Torbjörn Tännsjö on January 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] In Derek Parfit's original formulation the Repugnant Conclusion is stated as follows: "For any possible population of at least ten billion people, all with a very high quality of life, there must be some much larger imaginable population whose existence, if other things are equal, would be better even though its members have lives that are barely worth living" (Parfit 1984). The Repugnant Conclusion highlights a problem in an area of ethics which has become known as population ethics. The last three decades have...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Pantheism and Panentheism Project: Summer Stipend Program (£1000 x 10 awards; non-residential)

Please see the project website for details. The Pantheism and Panentheism Project, funded by the John Templeton Foundation, welcomes applications for summer stipends from scholars and writers who
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Please see the project website for details. The Pantheism and Panentheism Project, funded by the John Templeton Foundation, welcomes applications for summer stipends from scholars and writers who wish to spend the summer writing a paper for publication in a peer-reviewed academic journal, a reputable magazine (if they wish to write for a popular audience), or [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Calvinism and the Problem of Evil

2017.01.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David E. Alexander and Daniel M. Johnson (eds.), Calvinism and the Problem of Evil, Pickwick, 2016, 308pp., $29.60 (pbk), ISBN
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2017.01.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David E. Alexander and Daniel M. Johnson (eds.), Calvinism and the Problem of Evil, Pickwick, 2016, 308pp., $29.60 (pbk), ISBN 9781620325780. Reviewed by Jerry L. Walls, Houston Baptist University This book is both brave and bold. It is brave because most of its contributors defend a position that many Christian philosophers think is indefensible and, in fact, makes the problem of evil even worse than it already is. It is bold because the authors put forward a number of interesting proposals in arguing that their position is not only no worse off than other options on the table, but actually better. The book contains twelve essays and an introduction, and ten of these essays defend Calvinism in one way or another against various forms of the charge that Calvinism exacerbates the problem of evil. In the first essay, Daniel M. Johnson, one of the editors, provides a map of the territory, beginning... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

What's to blame for the death of the Western artistic tradition and the beginning of something entirely new? The dangerous idea of <strong>creative genius</strong>

What&#39;s to blame for the death of the Western artistic tradition and the beginning of something entirely new? The dangerous idea of creative
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What's to blame for the death of the Western artistic tradition and the beginning of something entirely new? The dangerous idea of creative genius

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Freud and women, Freud the clinician, Freud with his cigars, Freud and cocaine: Despite the vast materials by and about him, or perhaps because of them, we still don't know <strong>who Freud really was</strong>

Freud and women, Freud the clinician, Freud with his cigars, Freud and cocaine: Despite the vast materials by and about him, or perhaps because of them, we still don&#39;t know who Freud really
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Freud and women, Freud the clinician, Freud with his cigars, Freud and cocaine: Despite the vast materials by and about him, or perhaps because of them, we still don't know who Freud really was

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Good writers</strong> toil without regard for money. The literary economy runs on love, not avarice. That common view, which stretches back millennia, has never been true

Good writers toil without regard for money. The literary economy runs on love, not avarice. That common view, which stretches back millennia, has never been
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Good writers toil without regard for money. The literary economy runs on love, not avarice. That common view, which stretches back millennia, has never been true

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Heidegger in France

2017.01.07 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dominique Janicaud, Heidegger in France, Fran&#231;ois Raffoul and David Pettigrew (trs.), Indiana University Press, 2015, 540pp.,
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2017.01.07 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dominique Janicaud, Heidegger in France, François Raffoul and David Pettigrew (trs.), Indiana University Press, 2015, 540pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780253017734. Reviewed by Dennis J. Schmidt, Western Sydney University This book is an unusual intellectual history of a period and tradition still in flux, still unfolding and unfinished. It is sweeping in scope (covering over seventy years of Heidegger's widespread influence in French intellectual life) and equally wide ranging in its style: one finds theoretical discussions and academic debates discussed with insight and precision, and yet this book is full of anecdotes, as well as personal recollections (in the form of seven "Epilogues" appearing at various points). It tells the story of how Heidegger's thought entered, and often defined, some of the liveliest debates of French intellectual life in the 20th century. Dominique Janicaud (1937-2002) was well. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Because the study of logic ended with Aristotle, Kant believed, the field had run its course. But <strong>what was logic for</strong> in the first place?

Because the study of logic ended with Aristotle, Kant believed, the field had run its course. But what was logic for in the first
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Because the study of logic ended with Aristotle, Kant believed, the field had run its course. But what was logic for in the first place?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Utilitarianism and other abstract theories promise elegant solutions to life&rsquo;s challenges. But <strong>difficult decisions</strong> are part of what makes ethical thought ethical

Utilitarianism and other abstract theories promise elegant solutions to life&amp;rsquo;s challenges. But difficult decisions are part of what makes ethical thought
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Utilitarianism and other abstract theories promise elegant solutions to life’s challenges. But difficult decisions are part of what makes ethical thought ethical

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Is it tenable to celebrate the rise of identity politics in the university while deriding leftist critical theory? <strong>Richard Rorty</strong> thought so

Is it tenable to celebrate the rise of identity politics in the university while deriding leftist critical theory? Richard Rorty thought
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Is it tenable to celebrate the rise of identity politics in the university while deriding leftist critical theory? Richard Rorty thought so

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily