Beware the data based on <strong>multiple regression analyses</strong>. You&rsquo;re quite likely to get no information, or misinformation

Beware the data based on multiple regression analyses. You&amp;rsquo;re quite likely to get no information, or
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Beware the data based on multiple regression analyses. You’re quite likely to get no information, or misinformation

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Citing the advent of the Internet, Will Self <strong>proclaims the novel dead</strong>. Not true &mdash; in fact, the novel profits from its own precarious position

Citing the advent of the Internet, Will Self proclaims the novel dead. Not true &amp;mdash; in fact, the novel profits from its own precarious
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Citing the advent of the Internet, Will Self proclaims the novel dead. Not true — in fact, the novel profits from its own precarious position

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

How a centimeter of clay in a 1,300-foot layer of rock in Italy explains one of the most important days in the <strong>history of life</strong>

How a centimeter of clay in a 1,300-foot layer of rock in Italy explains one of the most important days in the history of
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How a centimeter of clay in a 1,300-foot layer of rock in Italy explains one of the most important days in the history of life

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Against Facts

2016.01.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Arianna Betti, Against Facts, MIT Press, 2015, 296pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262029216. Reviewed by Maria van der Schaar,
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2016.01.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Arianna Betti, Against Facts, MIT Press, 2015, 296pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262029216. Reviewed by Maria van der Schaar, Leiden University It is a fact that Napoleon was defeated at Waterloo and that Hitler lost the war. Against Facts does not claim that these sentences are false. Instead it argues against two influential ways in which philosophers understand the notion of fact. Facts are generally understood as compositional facts, or as whatever is named by 'the fact that so and so.' Arianna Betti argues that, if such expressions are names at all, the best candidates for reference are propositional facts, that is, true propositions, ideal objects on 'the level of sense'. A compositional fact is "a real object (and) part of the world at the level of reference" (p. 23). How does a compositional fact differ from events and from complexes? The fact Caesar's being dead... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Bloomsbury Companion to Political Philosophy

2016.01.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Political Philosophy, Bloomsbury, 2015, 271pp., $190.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.01.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Political Philosophy, Bloomsbury, 2015, 271pp., $190.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781847065544. Reviewed by Mathias Risse, Harvard University According to its publisher's website, the Bloomsbury Companions series "is a major series of single volume companions to key research fields in the humanities aimed at postgraduate students, scholars and libraries." In recent years about two dozen of these companions have appeared. The Companion to Political Philosophy is among the most recent additions. It consists of fourteen essays (stretching over about 220 pages). In keeping with the design of the series, the last two essays offer views on the possible future of the field. The twelve essays that discuss specific themes are on the history of political philosophy, sovereignty, cosmopolitanism, human rights, distributive justice, punishment, war, peace, liberal toleration,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Transcendental Turn

2016.01.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sebastian Gardner and Matthew Grist (eds.), The Transcendental Turn, Oxford University Press, 2015, 380pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.01.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sebastian Gardner and Matthew Grist (eds.), The Transcendental Turn, Oxford University Press, 2015, 380pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198724872. Reviewed by Robert Howell, University at Albany, SUNY, and Moscow State University The idea of a special "transcendental knowledge," an autonomous philosophical cognition that marks out necessary structures in our knowledge and its objects, goes back to Kant. The idea continues in the nineteenth century and is stressed anew by Husserl (who introduces the talk of a transcendental turn) and his successors. The present volume is part of a revived interest in such philosophy among Anglophone thinkers in the past fifty or so years. It derives from a research project organized by the late Mark Sacks. The volume collects important studies on the relations of key European thinkers to the transcendental tradition: Kant (essays by Henry E. Allison, Karl Ameriks, Paul Abela);. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

"<strong>We go to our deaths asymptotically</strong>, never getting there because &lsquo;we&rsquo; and &lsquo;there&rsquo; can&rsquo;t exist at the same moment"...

&quot;We go to our deaths asymptotically, never getting there because &amp;lsquo;we&amp;rsquo; and &amp;lsquo;there&amp;rsquo; can&amp;rsquo;t exist at the same
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"We go to our deaths asymptotically, never getting there because ‘we’ and ‘there’ can’t exist at the same moment"...

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

&ldquo;Destroy this and all letters,&rdquo; wrote <strong>Iris Murdoch</strong>, &ldquo;and keep your mouth shut.&rdquo; What didn't she want revealed? Her &ldquo;adult philosophy&rdquo;

&amp;ldquo;Destroy this and all letters,&amp;rdquo; wrote Iris Murdoch, &amp;ldquo;and keep your mouth shut.&amp;rdquo; What didn&#39;t she want revealed? Her &amp;ldquo;adult
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“Destroy this and all letters,” wrote Iris Murdoch, “and keep your mouth shut.” What didn't she want revealed? Her “adult philosophy”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Briefly a lawyer, <strong>Goethe</strong> turned to writing poetry and falling in love - and never stopped. At the age of 72, he proposed marriage to a 17-year-old

Briefly a lawyer, Goethe turned to writing poetry and falling in love - and never stopped. At the age of 72, he proposed marriage to a
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Briefly a lawyer, Goethe turned to writing poetry and falling in love - and never stopped. At the age of 72, he proposed marriage to a 17-year-old

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

‘Mate’ in Australian English

Mate is one of those words that is used widely in Englishes other than Australian English, and yet has a special resonance in Australia. Although it had a very detailed entry in the first edition of
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In anticipation of Australia Day, 26 January, we spoke to our colleagues down under what they would be celebrating. The answer: Australian English, of course. The following is an extract from What’s Their Story?: A History of Australian Words by Bruce Moore. Mate is one of those words that is used widely in Englishes other than Australian English, and yet has a special resonance in Australia. Although it had a very detailed entry in the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary (the letter M was completed 1904–8), the Australian National Dictionary (AND) included mate in its first edition of 1988, thus marking it as an Australianism. A revision of the OED entry for mate was posted online in December 2009, as part of the new third edition, and this gives us the opportunity to test the extent to which the word can be regarded as Australian. Not one of the standard presently used senses of mate in OED is marked Australian. What are they doing to our Australian word? One of the. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog