Auguste Comte

[Revised entry by Michel Bourdeau on October 16, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Auguste Comte (1798 - 1857) is the founder of positivism, a philosophical and political
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[Revised entry by Michel Bourdeau on October 16, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Auguste Comte (1798 - 1857) is the founder of positivism, a philosophical and political movement which enjoyed a very wide diffusion in the second half of the nineteenth century. It sank into an almost complete oblivion during the twentieth, when it was eclipsed by neopositivism. However, Comte's decision to develop successively a...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Assistant Professor in Ethics and Digital Culture

Job List:  Americas Name of institution:  University of Central
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Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
University of Central Florida
Town: 
Orlando
Country: 
USA
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Impassioned Belief

2014.10.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael Ridge, Impassioned Belief, Oxford University Press, 2014, 264pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199682669. Reviewed by
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2014.10.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael Ridge, Impassioned Belief, Oxford University Press, 2014, 264pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199682669. Reviewed by Andrew Alwood, Virginia Commonwealth University This book is the latest to explore the metaethical aims of the expressivist quasi-realism pioneered by Simon Blackburn and Allan Gibbard. Michael Ridge broaches an impressive range of topics involving language, thought, motivation, rationality, and disagreement, in order to defend Ecumenical Expressivism (EE), a sophisticated view about normative meanings. The basic aim for EE is to merge the advantages of what appears to be diametrically opposed theories: descriptivist realism and expressivist antirealism. Ridge appeals to the resources of descriptivists in outlining normative meanings -- there are normative propositions, normative truth, and extensions for normative predicates. But he self-consciously works to "earn the right" to such. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Sartre, Camus, and the Nobel Prize

The 1964 Nobel Prize in Literature was a crown without a king. Sartre’s refusal was not personal. It was metaphysical…
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The 1964 Nobel Prize in Literature was a crown without a king. Sartre’s refusal was not personal. It was metaphysical… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Finding poetry in computers

Machines can defeat chess masters, but can they create literature? The age of the computer as author, the “computhor,” is nigh…
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Machines can defeat chess masters, but can they create literature? The age of the computer as author, the “computhor,” is nigh… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The western model is broken

Ideas like development and progress have swept the world and left ruin in their wake, taking with them the West’s moral authority…
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Ideas like development and progress have swept the world and left ruin in their wake, taking with them the West’s moral authority… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Professional Philosophers' Susceptibility to Order Effects and Framing Effects in Evaluating Moral Dilemmas

Fiery Cushman and I have a new paper in draft, exploring the question of whether professional philosophers' judgments about moral dilemmas are less influenced than non-philosophers' by factors such
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Fiery Cushman and I have a new paper in draft, exploring the question of whether professional philosophers' judgments about moral dilemmas are less influenced than non-philosophers' by factors such as order of presentation and phrasing differences. We recruited hundreds of academic participants with graduate degrees in philosophy and a comparison group of academics with graduate degrees in other fields. We gave them two "trolley problems" and two "Asian disease"-type framing effect cases. We presented the trolley problems either with a Switch case first (the protagonist saves five people by Switching a runaway trolley onto a side track where it kills one), followed by a Push or Drop case (saving five by Pushing one person into the trolley's path or by Dropping him into its path). For each scenario, participants rated the protagonists' choice to kill the one person to save the five others, using a 7-point scale from "extremely morally good" to "extremely morally bad". Our previous. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

Richard Swinburne Lecture: Why ‘God Exists’ is Good News

This lecture will take place in Toronto on November 3rd. All are welcome to attend. It will also be live-streamed on the web. For details, see: www.ryerson.ca/~kraay/theism.html. Title:
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This lecture will take place in Toronto on November 3rd. All are welcome to attend. It will also be live-streamed on the web. For details, see: www.ryerson.ca/~kraay/theism.html. Title:             Why ‘There is a God’ is Good News Speaker:      Richard Swinburne, Emeritus Nolloth Professor of the Philosophy of the Christian Religion, Oxford University. Time:             Monday, November 3, [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Intentionality

[Revised entry by Pierre Jacob on October 15, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Intentionality is the power of minds to be about, to represent, or to stand for, things, properties and
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[Revised entry by Pierre Jacob on October 15, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Intentionality is the power of minds to be about, to represent, or to stand for, things, properties and states of affairs. The puzzles of intentionality lie at the interface between the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language. The word itself, which is of medieval...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Voter Fraud Protection or Voter Suppression?

One essential aspect of a democracy is the right of each citizen to vote. This also includes the right to have her vote count. One aspect of protecting this right is to ensure that voter fraud does
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English: map of voter ID laws in US (Photo credit: Wikipedia) One essential aspect of a democracy is the right of each citizen to vote. This also includes the right to have her vote count. One aspect of protecting this right is to ensure that voter fraud does not occur. After all, voter fraud can rob legitimate voters of their right to properly decide the election. Another aspect of protecting this right is to ensure that voter suppression does not occur. This is because voter suppression can unjustly rob people of their votes. Many Republicans have expressed concerns about voter fraud and have worked to enact laws aimed, they claim, at reducing such fraud. In response, many Democrats have countered that these laws are, they claim, aimed at voter suppression. Naturally, each side accuses the other of having wicked political motives. Many Democrats see the Republicans as trying to disenfranchise voters who tend to vote for Democrats (the young and minorities). The Republicans counter. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy