Algeria, India, Israel: In each place, the triumph of <strong>secular revolutions</strong> ironically helped pave the way for religious revivals

Algeria, India, Israel: In each place, the triumph of secular revolutions ironically helped pave the way for religious
Philosophy News image
Algeria, India, Israel: In each place, the triumph of secular revolutions ironically helped pave the way for religious revivals

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Algeria, India, Israel: In each place, the triumph of <strong>secular revolutions</strong> unwittingly helped pave the way for religious revivals

Algeria, India, Israel: In each place, the triumph of secular revolutions unwittingly helped pave the way for religious
Philosophy News image
Algeria, India, Israel: In each place, the triumph of secular revolutions unwittingly helped pave the way for religious revivals

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>J.M. Coetzee’s diaries</strong> are full of doubts, aperçus, distaste for Nadine Gordimer, and musings on poultry: “Chickens are always bad-tempered and ungracious”

J.M. Coetzee’s diaries are full of doubts, aper&#231;us, distaste for Nadine Gordimer, and musings on poultry: “Chickens are always bad-tempered and
Philosophy News image
J.M. Coetzee’s diaries are full of doubts, aperçus, distaste for Nadine Gordimer, and musings on poultry: “Chickens are always bad-tempered and ungracious”

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Project assistant

Job List:&amp;nbsp; Europe Name of institution:&amp;nbsp; ILLC, University of
Philosophy News image
Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
ILLC, University of Amsterdam
Town: 
Amsterdam
Country: 
Netherlands . . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Expressions of Judgment: An Essay on Kant's Aesthetics

2015.05.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Eli Friedlander,&#160;Expressions of Judgment: An Essay on Kant&#39;s Aesthetics, Harvard University Press, 2015, 117pp., $22.95 (hbk),
Philosophy News image
2015.05.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Eli Friedlander, Expressions of Judgment: An Essay on Kant's Aesthetics, Harvard University Press, 2015, 117pp., $22.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674368200. Reviewed by Miles Rind, Boston College As the Critique of Judgment is the most loosely and speculatively reasoned of Kant's three Critiques, so does it often attract a loose and speculative vein of commentary. Eli Friedlander's essay is a work in this vein. Readers who are drawn to Kant's text mainly by its suggestiveness and who ask of secondary literature that it draw the various strands of suggestion into a coherent picture, no matter how vague, will find Friedlander's book rewarding. But those who look to secondary literature for the discovery of cogent lines of argumentation in the text or for the resolution of interpretative perplexities will be disappointed. The book comprises an introduction and four chapters. In the introduction, Friedlander compares the. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Robin George Collingwood

[Revised entry by Giuseppina D&#39;Oro and James Connelly on May 13, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] R. G. Collingwood (1889 - 1943) was a British philosopher and practising archaeologist
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Giuseppina D'Oro and James Connelly on May 13, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] R. G. Collingwood (1889 - 1943) was a British philosopher and practising archaeologist best known for his work in aesthetics and the philosophy of history. During the 1950s and 1960s his philosophy of history in particular occupied centre stage in the debate concerning the nature of explanation in the social sciences and whether or not they are ultimately reducible to explanations in the natural sciences. Primarily through the interpretative efforts of W. H. Dray,...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Charles Leslie Stevenson

[Revised entry by Daniel R. Boisvert on May 13, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Charles Leslie Stevenson (1908 - 1979) was a mid-Twentieth Century American philosopher best known for
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Daniel R. Boisvert on May 13, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Charles Leslie Stevenson (1908 - 1979) was a mid-Twentieth Century American philosopher best known for his pioneering work in the field of metaethics (the study of the relations among moral language, thought, reality, and knowledge) and, specifically, as a central figure along with I. A. Richards and A. J. Ayer in the development of emotivism. Emotivism, a precursor to the metaethical expressivism today championed by Simon Blackburn (1984, 1993) and Alan Gibbard (1990, 2003) among others, is typically understood as a theory of moral language according to which ethical terms are used much like...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Contextualism and Skepticism — draft of chapter

link pdf Does the contextualist seek to dissolve disputes over skepticism? And does she use a &amp;#8220;perfectly general strategy&amp;#8221; for doing so? Is she not interested in, or not addressing, the
Philosophy News image
link pdf Does the contextualist seek to dissolve disputes over skepticism? And does she use a “perfectly general strategy” for doing so? Is she not interested in, or not addressing, the traditional topic of whether we really know things, instead addressing how the word “know” should be used? Is she engaged in philosophy of language instead of epistemology? Is she addressing the more important types of skeptic? And what are those? Are key aspects of her position inexpressible, by her own lights? Is she subject to a “factivity problem”? These and other questions are answered in this draft of my 4th chapter of the book I’ve been working on. Please let me know if there are other pressing worries I don’t address, or if there’s some problem with some of my answers. For my part, I’ll be happy if I just never again have to hear anything like “The contextualist only answers the high standards skeptic.” Oh, I forgot: I. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Certain Doubts »

Computation in Physical Systems

[Revised entry by Gualtiero Piccinini on May 13, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] In our ordinary discourse, we distinguish between physical systems that perform computations, such as
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Gualtiero Piccinini on May 13, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] In our ordinary discourse, we distinguish between physical systems that perform computations, such as computers and calculators, and physical systems that don't, such as rocks. Among computing devices, we distinguish between more and less powerful ones. These distinctions affect our behavior: if a device is computationally more powerful than another, we pay more money for it. What grounds these distinctions? What is the principled difference, if there is one,...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Foundations for Moral Relativism

2015.05.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews J. David Velleman,&#160;Foundations for Moral Relativism, Open Book, 2013, 122pp., $19.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781909254442. Reviewed by
Philosophy News image
2015.05.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews J. David Velleman, Foundations for Moral Relativism, Open Book, 2013, 122pp., $19.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781909254442. Reviewed by Antti Kauppinen, Trinity College Dublin It comes as no surprise that David Velleman's brief but dense new book is original, provocative, erudite, and seductive. Drawing on a characteristically broad range of non-philosophical sources -- such as game studies, anthropology, and ethnomethodology -- he presents novel arguments in defense of moral relativism. In this review, I will examine some of his central arguments. What is moral relativism? It is not the view that different things are morally right or wrong in different circumstances. Non-relativists agree that whether it is wrong to let a child play alone in the park or dance at a funeral depends on whether there is a risk of significant harm or whether the behavior is disrespectful in context. What they insist on is that. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News