If Terry Eagleton were king

If Terry Eagleton ruled the world: No sports, prisons, cellphones, or pomo cant. And Martin Amis would be compelled to issue calls to prayer at his local mosque…
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If Terry Eagleton ruled the world: No sports, prisons, cellphones, or pomo cant. And Martin Amis would be compelled to issue calls to prayer at his local mosque… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Is Paul Ekman stretching the truth?

Paul Ekman is known for recognizing a lie just by the look on the speaker’s face. But has the psychologist stretched the truth?…
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Paul Ekman is known for recognizing a lie just by the look on the speaker’s face. But has the psychologist stretched the truth?… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The secret history of invisible ink

Lemon juice, orange juice, onion juice; saliva, urine, blood, vinegar, aspirin, and a laxative: How to mix your own invisible ink…
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Lemon juice, orange juice, onion juice; saliva, urine, blood, vinegar, aspirin, and a laxative: How to mix your own invisible ink… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Herodotus and the past

Hearsay at the roots of history: In his time, Herodotus was known as a storytelling tourist. But the attacks on his reputation didn’t let up…
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Hearsay at the roots of history: In his time, Herodotus was known as a storytelling tourist. But the attacks on his reputation didn’t let up… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

IAI Debate: Escaping the Moral Maze

How should we think about moral principles? Are they still relevant and necessary or is society hiding behind them to foster prejudice and inequality? This IAI debate explores these questions.

LOGO_iai-black_40x3732[2]Philosophers have been debating the topic of morality throughout recorded history. It's one of those perennial topics for which philosophy is criticized for its inability to find hard and fast solutions. Its complexity is both compelling and frustrating partly because ethics and moral order seems so foundational to what it means to be human. The Institute of Arts and Ideas have hosted a debate that adds to the corpus of material on the subject that's sure to make you think. From their website: "Despite the decline in religion, most of us remain attached to morality. Yet as the Moral Maze attests and suicide bombers confirm, there are an unlimited number of contradictory 'moral' outlooks. Should we recognise morality as a figleaf for prejudice? Or is this to give up on a capacity that makes us human?"

The Panel: Rose, Harvard philosopher Thomas Pogge and Big Issue founder John Bird to contemplate the limits of morality. In association with the Big Issue.

Check out the video below and visit their website to join the conversation!

Shakespeare’s Genius Is Nonsense

Shakespeare and the brain. Wordplay, poetics, figurative language: the Bard can teach cognitive scientists about meaning and the mind…
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Shakespeare and the brain. Wordplay, poetics, figurative language: the Bard can teach cognitive scientists about meaning and the mind… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Samuel Beckett’s letters

“I do not like publication of letters,” wrote Samuel Beckett. Reading his letters, we see why he wanted to keep his private life private…
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“I do not like publication of letters,” wrote Samuel Beckett. Reading his letters, we see why he wanted to keep his private life private… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Office fiction

From Bartleby to Joshua Ferris, the atmosphere of the office novel is one of disaffection. Recent stories tend to begin with layoffs…
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From Bartleby to Joshua Ferris, the atmosphere of the office novel is one of disaffection. Recent stories tend to begin with layoffs… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Finding Ourselves at the Movies: Philosophy for a New Generation

2014.10.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Paul W. Kahn, Finding Ourselves at the Movies: Philosophy for a New Generation, Columbia University Press, 2013, 239pp., $35.00
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2014.10.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Paul W. Kahn, Finding Ourselves at the Movies: Philosophy for a New Generation, Columbia University Press, 2013, 239pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN: 9780231164382. Reviewed by Sarah Cooper, King's College London In film scholarship, there is a long-standing history of interest in that crucial yet enigmatic point of intersection between the cinema and the world beyond its walls, as well as between the movies and their spectators. From interrogation of cinematic realism, through audience studies, to painstakingly detailed psychoanalytic theoretical study of spectatorship, and in research into the political, moral, and ethical effects of the moving image, the relationship between our world, ourselves, and the movies we view has received a great deal of scrutiny and continues to be a key area of concern within film studies today. Paul W. Kahn's elegant book is a fascinating intervention in this area of interest, which. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Survey on areas of philosophy

Last month, I ran a survey on perceptions of areas of philosophy and their relationship with empirical science. The study is now complete and I've written a report of the results, which can be
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Last month, I ran a survey on perceptions of areas of philosophy and their relationship with empirical science. The study is now complete and I've written a report of the results, which can be downloaded here. Abstract below.Abstract: Six hundred and three people completed a survey measuring perceptions of traditional areas of philosophical inquiry and their relationship to empirical science. The ten areas studied were: aesthetics, epistemology, ethics, history of philosophy, logic, metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, and political philosophy. For each area, participants rated whether it is currently central to philosophy (centrality), whether its centrality depends on integration with science (dependence), and whether work in the area is sufficiently integrated with science (integration). Centrality judgments tended to be high. Participants viewed nine of the ten areas as central to philosophy (the exception being aesthetics), although they. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy