5th Annual Edinburgh Graduate Epistemology Conference

The University of Edinburgh is pleased to announce a call for papers for the 5th Annual Edinburgh Graduate Epistemology Conference (27th-28th May 2015). Our keynote speakers this year will be
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The University of Edinburgh is pleased to announce a call for papers for the 5th Annual Edinburgh Graduate Epistemology Conference (27th-28th May 2015). Our keynote speakers this year will be Elizabeth Fricker (Oxford) and Jennifer Nagel (Toronto). All graduate presentations will have respondents from faculty members at Edinburgh or a neighbouring university. We are inviting graduate students to submit essays within any area of epistemology (broadly construed). Essays should be approximately 4000 words, and should be anonymised for blind review. We would really like the conference to be representative of the graduate community and so we strongly encourage submissions from anyone working on epistemology who is a member of an under-represented group. We will be happy to help arrange childcare for any attendees who would find it helpful. Please feel free to get in touch to discuss this, or any accessibility requirements you may have. The deadline for submissions is 1st March 2015. For. . .

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The Nature of Scientific Thinking: On Interpretation, Explanation, and Understanding

2014.11.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jan Faye, The Nature of Scientific Thinking: On Interpretation, Explanation, and Understanding, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 333pp.,
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2014.11.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jan Faye, The Nature of Scientific Thinking: On Interpretation, Explanation, and Understanding, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 333pp., $105.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781137389824. Reviewed by Henk W. de Regt, VU University Amsterdam Two years ago Jan Faye published After Postmodernism: A Naturalistic Reconstruction of the Humanities (Palgrave Macmillan 2012). His new book complements that work, applying the same approach to the natural sciences. In fact, one of Faye's central theses is that (at least from the epistemological point of view) no sharp distinction between the humanities and the natural sciences can or should be drawn. In contrast to the traditional view that the natural sciences aim at explanation and representation while the humanities strive for understanding and interpretation, Faye claims that these four notions are important in all disciplines. He elaborates this thesis for the natural sciences,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

From Mastery to Mystery: A Phenomenological Foundation for an Environmental Ethic

2014.11.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Bryan E. Bannon, From Mastery to Mystery: A Phenomenological Foundation for an Environmental Ethic, Ohio University Press, 2014,
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2014.11.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Bryan E. Bannon, From Mastery to Mystery: A Phenomenological Foundation for an Environmental Ethic, Ohio University Press, 2014, 200pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780821420645. Reviewed by Michael E. Zimmerman, University of Colorado Boulder Bryan E. Bannon's book is an ambitious effort to lay the foundation for environmental ethics (EE), by developing an alternative to the nature-society dualism and substance metaphysics that are arguably central features of modernity. Instead of viewing nature as a monolithic, hierarchically-ordered, systemic, ahistorical, and transcendent domain needed to stabilize an historical human society, Bannon calls on work by Bruno Latour, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty to depict nature itself as historical, as "an actant, an assemblage of bodies contingently related such that there is an order, always subject to revision and reconstitution, that emerges from the interrelationships. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Reason and the Republic of Opinion

Why is reason important? Leon Wieseltier explains: “We need not be a nation of intellectuals, but we must not be a nation of idiots”…
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Why is reason important? Leon Wieseltier explains: “We need not be a nation of intellectuals, but we must not be a nation of idiots”… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Jewish Exiles Return to Germany

In the early 50s, German-Jewish philosophers began returning to Frankfurt, Munich, Berlin, Heidelberg. Jürgen Habermas was a young man at the time. He remembers it well…
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In the early 50s, German-Jewish philosophers began returning to Frankfurt, Munich, Berlin, Heidelberg. Jürgen Habermas was a young man at the time. He remembers it well… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Eagleton on Zizek

Formidably erudite, faintly manic, and impossible to shut up, Slavoj Žižek is a cult figure. At least he’s self-aware enough to send-up that status…
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Formidably erudite, faintly manic, and impossible to shut up, Slavoj Žižek is a cult figure. At least he’s self-aware enough to send-up that status… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Charles Sanders Peirce

[Revised entry by Robert Burch on November 12, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, self-contextualization.html] Charles Sanders Peirce (1839 - 1914) was the founder of American pragmatism
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[Revised entry by Robert Burch on November 12, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, self-contextualization.html] Charles Sanders Peirce (1839 - 1914) was the founder of American pragmatism (after about 1905 called by Peirce "pragmaticism" in order to differentiate his views from those of William James, John Dewey, and others, which were being...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Eating What Bugs Us

Like most people, I have eaten bugs. Also, like most Americans, this consumption has been unintentional and often in ignorance. In some cases, I’ve sucked in a whole bug while running. In most
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Like most people, I have eaten bugs. Also, like most Americans, this consumption has been unintentional and often in ignorance. In some cases, I’ve sucked in a whole bug while running. In most cases, the bugs are bug parts in foods—the FDA allows a certain percentage of “debris” in our food and some of that is composes of bugs. While Americans typically do not willingly and knowingly eat insects, about 2 billion people do and there are about 2,000 species that are known to be edible. As might be guessed, many of the people who eat insect live in developing countries. As the countries develop, people tend to switch away from eating insects. This is hardly surprising—eating meat is generally seen as a sign of status while eating insects typically is not. However, there are excellent reasons to utilize insects on a large scale as a food source for humans and animals. Some of these reasons are practical while others are ethical. One practical reason to utilize insects as a food source is. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Collected Works Volume 1: Scientific Rationality, the Human Condition, and 20th Century Cosmologies

2014.11.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adolf Grünbaum, Collected Works Volume 1: Scientific Rationality, the Human Condition, and 20th Century Cosmologies, Thomas Kupka
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2014.11.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adolf Grünbaum, Collected Works Volume 1: Scientific Rationality, the Human Condition, and 20th Century Cosmologies, Thomas Kupka (ed.), Oxford University Press, 2013, 280pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199989928. Reviewed by Gary L. Hardcastle, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania More readily perhaps than most volumes of collected works, this volume, the first of three from Adolf Grünbaum, can be read with profit in two quite different ways. It can, and should, be read first for what it is, a collection of ten of Grünbaum's best-known essays on scientific "rationality" (three essays), "determinism and the human condition" (three as well), and "theological interpretations of twentieth-century physical cosmologies" (four essays, including "The Poverty of Theistic Cosmology," a 50-page tour de force). Forthcoming second and third volumes will assemble Grünbaum's most significant papers on the philosophy of. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Knowing What to Do: Imagination, Virtue, and Platonism in Ethics

2014.11.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Timothy Chappell, Knowing What to Do: Imagination, Virtue, and Platonism in Ethics, Oxford University Press, 2014, 339pp., $74.00
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2014.11.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Timothy Chappell, Knowing What to Do: Imagination, Virtue, and Platonism in Ethics, Oxford University Press, 2014, 339pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199684854. Reviewed by Hallvard Lillehammer, Birkbeck, University of London In this book, Timothy Chappell continues the critical project he developed in Ethics and Experience (2009) where he argued that no conventional systematic moral theory could count as a convincing ethical outlook. His new book, largely based on a series of previously published papers, goes beyond his earlier one to further articulate what a convincing ethical outlook would look like. Chappell's preferred method is exemplification, in particular exemplification of his own ethical outlook. He proceeds in a piecemeal fashion, making contributions to a variety of philosophical debates, including the theory of reasons, demandingness and impartiality, contemporary moral epistemology, and the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News