Squaring the Circle in Descartes' Meditations: The Strong Validation of Reason

2015.04.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stephen I. Wagner, Squaring the Circle in Descartes' Meditations: The Strong Validation of Reason, Cambridge University Press,
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2015.04.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stephen I. Wagner, Squaring the Circle in Descartes' Meditations: The Strong Validation of Reason, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 244pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107072060. Reviewed by Georges Dicker, The College at Brockport: State University of New York In order to defend Descartes against the charge of circularity, commentators often argue that his doubt is restricted in some way that exempts current clear and distinct perceptions from any doubt; for example, that it extends only to remembered clear and distinct perceptions (e.g., John Cottingham), or that it applies only to the general principle that whatever the meditator perceives clearly and distinctly is true (e.g., Anthony Kenny, Bernard Williams, James Van Cleve). In his unusual and provocative book, Stephen Wagner rejects such palliatives. He holds that Descartes' doubt is completely general, yet can be answered. He traces the doubt to. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Interview with Renata Adler

“Mostly the good guys are the good guys and the not-good guys are not the good guys,” says Renata Adler. “Other people are just whatever they are”…
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“Mostly the good guys are the good guys and the not-good guys are not the good guys,” says Renata Adler. “Other people are just whatever they are”… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Philosophy and the real world

Studying with Stanley Fish and Richard Rorty, Crispin Sartwell couldn’t help but detect a sense of the end. It was the 80s, and it was an end for philosophy…
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Studying with Stanley Fish and Richard Rorty, Crispin Sartwell couldn’t help but detect a sense of the end. It was the 80s, and it was an end for philosophy… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Philosophers and their religious practices, part 8: religious naturalism

This is the eighth installment of a series of interviews I am conducting with academic philosophers about their religious practices. In this series of interviews, I ask philosophers about their
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This is the eighth installment of a series of interviews I am conducting with academic philosophers about their religious practices. In this series of interviews, I ask philosophers about their religious practices and the influence on their philosophical work. Follow the links for parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. The contributors are in various stages [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Question about Existence - Douglas Burnham responds

Do rainbows exist? I assume rain drops and sunlight exist, but the rainbow is not a collection of rain drops, nor a region of the atmosphere where passing rain drops get some colour, is it? Should
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Do rainbows exist? I assume rain drops and sunlight exist, but the rainbow is not a collection of rain drops, nor a region of the atmosphere where passing rain drops get some colour, is it? Should we say that rainbows are optical illusions? Or what? Response from: Douglas Burnham Lots of things should be said to exist, even though they are not material entities (like raindrops) nor energy forms (like sunlight). We're happy to talk about numbers or abstract concepts as existing, for example, and likewise dreams, or things that happened in the past. We might provisionally say that X exists if it were to matter in some way if someone asserted that X did not exist. (This is a pragmatist definition. I'm not endorsing it so much as finding it useful.) If someone said that you DID NOT have the dream last night you say you had, then that would matter, because they would be saying you are lying; if someone says that we have no concept of causation (Hume), then that matters because whole. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Postdoctoral Postion

Job List:  Americas Name of institution:  University of New
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Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
University of New Hampshire
Town: 
Durham, NH
Country: 
USA
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Joyce Maynard back to Yale

Joyce Maynard left Yale after two semesters to be with J.D. Salinger, the man she loved. She never returned, to her deep regret…
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Joyce Maynard left Yale after two semesters to be with J.D. Salinger, the man she loved. She never returned, to her deep regret… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Battle for Ulysses

Those who don’t praise Ulysses, wrote Ezra Pound, earn themselves a place “in the lower intellectual orders.” But to praise it, shouldn’t we understand it?…
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Those who don’t praise Ulysses, wrote Ezra Pound, earn themselves a place “in the lower intellectual orders.” But to praise it, shouldn’t we understand it?… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Justice Through Apologies: Remorse, Reform, and Punishment

2015.04.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nick Smith, Justice Through Apologies: Remorse, Reform, and Punishment, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 402pp., $32.99 (pbk),
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2015.04.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nick Smith, Justice Through Apologies: Remorse, Reform, and Punishment, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 402pp., $32.99 (pbk), ISBN 9780521189453. Reviewed by Colleen Murphy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign This book builds on Nick Smith's first, I Was Wrong. It presents and defends a practical framework for understanding the role apologies should play in the criminal and civil law, and contrasts this role with the function apologies currently do play in the United States. It also offers a detailed, interdisciplinary critical evaluation of the current legal system in the United States, which raises a rich set of issues for moral, political and legal theorists interested in understanding the conditions that must be in place for legal institutions to actually serve an important moral purpose. In I Was Wrong Smith articulates and defends what he calls a categorical apology. Such an apology serves. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

H.L. Mencken’s Merry Days

Those who claim Mencken was incapable of writing a boring sentence haven’t read the 1,200 pages of post-publication notes he appended to his memoirs…
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Those who claim Mencken was incapable of writing a boring sentence haven’t read the 1,200 pages of post-publication notes he appended to his memoirs… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily