Gene editing threatens to homogenize society, says <strong>Atul Gawande</strong>. Aberrant yet valuable characteristics are under threat. Think of George Church's narcolepsy

Gene editing threatens to homogenize society, says Atul Gawande. Aberrant yet valuable characteristics are under threat. Think of George Church&#39;s
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Gene editing threatens to homogenize society, says Atul Gawande. Aberrant yet valuable characteristics are under threat. Think of George Church's narcolepsy

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Heidegger's Shadow: Kant, Husserl and the Transcendental Turn

2017.07.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Chad Engelland, Heidegger&#39;s Shadow: Kant, Husserl and the Transcendental Turn, Routledge, 2017, xiv + 275pp., $140 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.07.14 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Chad Engelland, Heidegger's Shadow: Kant, Husserl and the Transcendental Turn, Routledge, 2017, xiv + 275pp., $140 (hbk), ISBN 9781138181878. Reviewed by Sacha Golob, King's College London One way to understand the trajectory of Heidegger's thought is as a series of engagements with the possibilities and the risks inherent in transcendental philosophy. This approach is the basis of Engelland's book; as he elegantly puts it, the transcendental functions throughout Heidegger's career as the 'shadow' which he cannot jump over, the hermeneutic situation out of which he writes (p.206). Heidegger's attitude to the transcendental evidently undergoes complex shifts, shifts mediated in part by his successive dialogues with Husserl, Kant, and others, but Engelland's central argument is that this attitude is never purely negative: as he sees it, even the later Heidegger offers what is effectively a 'transcendental. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Slavery: Consequences & Status

Embed from Getty Images While there is a multitude of moral theories, two of the big dogs of ethics are utilitarianism and deontology. John Stuart Mill presents the paradigm of utilitarian ethics:
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Embed from Getty Images While there is a multitude of moral theories, two of the big dogs of ethics are utilitarianism and deontology. John Stuart Mill presents the paradigm of utilitarian ethics: the morality of an action is dependent on the happiness and unhappiness it creates for the morally relevant beings. Moral status, for this sort of utilitarian, is defined in terms of the being’s capacity to experience happiness and unhappiness. Beings count to the degree they can experience these states. Obviously, a being that could not experience either would not count—except to the degree that what happened to it affected beings that could experience happiness and unhappiness. Of course, even a being that has moral status merely gets included in the utilitarian calculation. As such, all beings are means to the ends—namely maximizing happiness and minimizing unhappiness. Kant, the paradigm deontologist, rejects the utilitarian approach.  Instead, he contends that ethics is a matter of. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Two numerals: “six” and “hundred,” part 2: “hundred”

Like the history of some other words denoting numbers, the history of hundred is full of sticks and stones. To begin with, we notice that hundred, like dozen, thousand, million, and billion, is a
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Like the history of some other words denoting numbers, the history of hundred is full of sticks and stones. To begin with, we notice that hundred, like dozen, thousand, million, and billion, is a noun rather than a numeral and requires an article (compare six people versus a hundred people); it also has a regular plural (a numeral, to have the plural form, has to be turned into a noun, or substantivized, as in twos and threes, at sixes and sevens, on all fours, and the like). Finally, it resembles and indeed is a compound (hund-red). Eleven and twelve are also compounds (see the previous post), but, to use a technical term, disguised ones, that is, we can hardly or not at all discern their ancient elements. However, though hundred does fall into two parts, neither hund- nor –red means anything to a modern speaker. Before going on, let us note that in the remotest past people hardly needed words designating exact high numbers. One sheep, two sheep…, perhaps ten sheep, and then a. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

Alcohol dissolves the barrier between aspiration and judgment. Come morning, the barrier is rebuilt. You mourn for the feeling you had last night. <strong>Metaphysics of the hangover</strong>

Alcohol dissolves the barrier between aspiration and judgment. Come morning, the barrier is rebuilt. You mourn for the feeling you had last night. Metaphysics of the
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Alcohol dissolves the barrier between aspiration and judgment. Come morning, the barrier is rebuilt. You mourn for the feeling you had last night. Metaphysics of the hangover

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

For <strong>Stuart Hall</strong>, culture is what defines common sense and builds our identities. But how to understand the role of culture we never experience?

For Stuart Hall, culture is what defines common sense and builds our identities. But how to understand the role of culture we never
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For Stuart Hall, culture is what defines common sense and builds our identities. But how to understand the role of culture we never experience?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Rather than &ldquo;Which side are you on?,&rdquo; <strong>Samuel Huntington </strong>wrote, the question in the post-Cold War world would be &ldquo;Who are you?&rdquo; What a prescient insight

Rather than &amp;ldquo;Which side are you on?,&amp;rdquo; Samuel Huntington wrote, the question in the post-Cold War world would be &amp;ldquo;Who are you?&amp;rdquo; What a prescient
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Rather than “Which side are you on?,” Samuel Huntington wrote, the question in the post-Cold War world would be “Who are you?” What a prescient insight

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Human Existence and Transcendence

2017.07.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jean Wahl, Human Existence and Transcendence, William Hackett (tr. and ed.), University of Notre Dame Press, 2016, 151pp., $40.00
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2017.07.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jean Wahl, Human Existence and Transcendence, William Hackett (tr. and ed.), University of Notre Dame Press, 2016, 151pp., $40.00 (hbk.), ISBN 9780268101060. Reviewed by Edward Baring, Drew University In twentieth-century French intellectual history, Jean Wahl is a ubiquitous if elusive figure. He was the author of the essay and then book, "Vers le concret [towards the concrete]," whose title became a rallying cry for critics of French idealism in the 1930s. Wahl then gained fame for guiding the reception of many of the main non-French sources for existentialism: he wrote the highly respected Études Kierkegaardiennes in 1938, which was an important reference point for scholars both in France and elsewhere, and his readings of Hegel, Heidegger, Nietzsche, and Jaspers set the standard against which a generation of thinkers developed their own interpretations. Later, his books A Short History of Existentialism. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Legal Punishment

[Revised entry by Antony Duff and Zachary Hoskins on July 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The question of whether, and how, legal punishment can be justified has long been a central
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[Revised entry by Antony Duff and Zachary Hoskins on July 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The question of whether, and how, legal punishment can be justified has long been a central to legal, moral, and political philosophy: what could justify a state in using the apparatus of the law to inflict intentionally burdensome treatment on its citizens? Radically different answers to this question are offered by consequentialist and by retributivist theorists - and by those who seek to incorporate consequentialist and retributivist considerations in 'mixed' theories of punishment. Meanwhile, abolitionist...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Panpsychism

[Revised entry by Philip Goff, William Seager, and Sean Allen-Hermanson on July 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html, supplement.html] Panpsychism is the view that mentality
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[Revised entry by Philip Goff, William Seager, and Sean Allen-Hermanson on July 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html, supplement.html] Panpsychism is the view that mentality is fundamental and ubiquitous in the natural world. The view has a long and venerable history in philosophical traditions of both East and West, and has recently enjoyed a revival in analytic philosophy. For its proponents panpsychism offers an attractive middle way between physicalism on the one hand and dualism on the other. The worry with dualism - the view that mind and matter are fundamentally different kinds of thing - is that it leaves us with a radically disunified picture...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy