Refugees and the Ethics of Forced Displacement

2017.05.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Serena Parekh, Refugees and the Ethics of Forced Displacement, Routledge, 2017, 296pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415712613.
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2017.05.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Serena Parekh, Refugees and the Ethics of Forced Displacement, Routledge, 2017, 296pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415712613. Reviewed by Michael Blake, University of Washington Serena Parekh's book begins with some startling facts. 65.3 million people in our world live outside the state system, displaced from their countries of origin yet not legally resettled into a country of refuge. Of this group, only one percent will eventually be resettled into a new country of refuge. The rest will continue to live in a parallel world of temporary solutions; they disappear into large urban centers, or are warehoused in refugee camps. The average duration of stay in these camps, finally, is approximately seventeen years (3). Parekh's cogent volume argues that political philosophers have not adequately come to grips with these facts. Doing so would require us to develop a new form of ethical analysis focused particularly. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Plural Quantification

[Revised entry by Øystein Linnebo on May 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Ordinary English contains different forms of quantification over objects. In addition to the
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[Revised entry by Øystein Linnebo on May 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Ordinary English contains different forms of quantification over objects. In addition to the usual singular quantification, as in (1) There is an apple on the table...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Medieval Political Philosophy

[Revised entry by John Kilcullen and Jonathan Robinson on May 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Medieval philosophy is the philosophy produced in Western Europe during the
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[Revised entry by John Kilcullen and Jonathan Robinson on May 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Medieval philosophy is the philosophy produced in Western Europe during the middle ages. There is no consensus, even among medievalists, as to when this period begins or ends;[1] however, it is conventional - and probably neither fully correct nor incorrect - to begin with Augustine (354 - 430), and note that the influence of medieval philosophy...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Global Political Theory

2017.05.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Held and Pietro Maffettone (eds.), Global Political Theory, Polity, 2016, 332pp., $28.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745687155l.
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2017.05.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Held and Pietro Maffettone (eds.), Global Political Theory, Polity, 2016, 332pp., $28.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745687155l. Reviewed by Emma Saunders-Hastings, University of Chicago David Held and Pietro Maffettone collect essays exploring the global dimensions -- and arguing for the necessarily global character -- of contemporary political theorizing. The contributors are leading scholars in global political theory, and the book provides an unusually broad view of the field, In addition to the familiar topics of human rights and global distributive justice, it includes contributions on the legitimacy of international law and transnational political institutions; on just war theory; and on a cluster of issues including territoriality, the global economy, and humans' relations to the natural environment and to future generations. This integrated approach is welcome, and the book as a whole is a valuable. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Though seen as titans of the literary left, <strong>Jameson, Eagleton, and Raymond Williams</strong> were more concerned with scholarship than with social intervention. Do they belong to the right?

Though seen as titans of the literary left, Jameson, Eagleton, and Raymond Williams were more concerned with scholarship than with social intervention. Do they belong to the
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Though seen as titans of the literary left, Jameson, Eagleton, and Raymond Williams were more concerned with scholarship than with social intervention. Do they belong to the right?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What comes from a 79-year-old <strong>French Maoist</strong> lecturing young people about being young? Some genuine insight, surprisingly

What comes from a 79-year-old French Maoist lecturing young people about being young? Some genuine insight,
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What comes from a 79-year-old French Maoist lecturing young people about being young? Some genuine insight, surprisingly

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Encouraged by success, <strong>F. Scott Fitzgerald</strong> continued in a lofty, literary, yet Hollywood-ready mode. But the demands of art and audience rarely aligned

Encouraged by success, F. Scott Fitzgerald continued in a lofty, literary, yet Hollywood-ready mode. But the demands of art and audience rarely
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Encouraged by success, F. Scott Fitzgerald continued in a lofty, literary, yet Hollywood-ready mode. But the demands of art and audience rarely aligned

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Meaning and Mortality in Kierkegaard and Heidegger: Origins of the Existential Philosophy of Death

2017.05.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adam Buben, Meaning and Mortality in Kierkegaard and Heidegger: Origins of the Existential Philosophy of Death, Northwestern
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2017.05.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adam Buben, Meaning and Mortality in Kierkegaard and Heidegger: Origins of the Existential Philosophy of Death, Northwestern University Press, 2016, 189pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780810132504. Reviewed by Arun Iyer, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay Adam Buben's compact book is ideally meant for the philosophically minded student of Christian theology. It is an attempt to systematize, from a strictly Christian perspective that is informed by the work of Kierkegaard, the myriad reflections in the history of Western thought on the meaning of human existence in the face of death and mortality. Kierkegaard is without doubt the central figure of this book, as the bibliography clearly indicates. However, much more significantly, the author gives himself the mission of roping in Heidegger as an ally for Kierkegaard's idiosyncratic Christian musings on death and the meaning of human existence. He uncovers in. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

It's not that <strong>Heidegger</strong> was a windbag with nothing to say. His appeal stemmed from how he said nothing with a capital &ldquo;N.&rdquo; In emergencies we listen for capital letters

It&#39;s not that Heidegger was a windbag with nothing to say. His appeal stemmed from how he said nothing with a capital &amp;ldquo;N.&amp;rdquo; In emergencies we listen for capital
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It's not that Heidegger was a windbag with nothing to say. His appeal stemmed from how he said nothing with a capital “N.” In emergencies we listen for capital letters

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Anger is a popular emotion. It is seen as an engine of progress, a check on injustice. But it also pollutes democratic politics and is of dubious value in both life and the law, says <strong>Martha Nussbaum</strong>

Anger is a popular emotion. It is seen as an engine of progress, a check on injustice. But it also pollutes democratic politics and is of dubious value in both life and the law, says Martha
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Anger is a popular emotion. It is seen as an engine of progress, a check on injustice. But it also pollutes democratic politics and is of dubious value in both life and the law, says Martha Nussbaum

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily