The 19th-century Faithist community of Shalam had bold plans for expansion. But a problem loomed: <strong>amateur metaphysicians </strong>had little aptitude for physical labor

The 19th-century Faithist community of Shalam had bold plans for expansion. But a problem loomed: amateur metaphysicians had little aptitude for physical
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The 19th-century Faithist community of Shalam had bold plans for expansion. But a problem loomed: amateur metaphysicians had little aptitude for physical labor

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Feminist Metaphysics

[Revised entry by Sally Haslanger and &#193;sta on August 11, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Metaphysics is the study of the basic structure of reality, of what there is and what it is
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[Revised entry by Sally Haslanger and Ásta on August 11, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Metaphysics is the study of the basic structure of reality, of what there is and what it is like. It considers, for example, concepts such as identity, causation, substance, and kind, that seem to be presupposed by any form of inquiry; and it attempts to determine what there is at the most general level. For example, are there minds in addition to bodies? Do things persist through change? Is there freewill or is all action determined by prior events? But since metaphysics not only concerns itself with what there...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Love

[Revised entry by Bennett Helm on August 11, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] This essay focuses on personal love, or the love of particular persons as such. Part of the
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[Revised entry by Bennett Helm on August 11, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] This essay focuses on personal love, or the love of particular persons as such. Part of the philosophical task in understanding personal love is to distinguish the various kinds of personal love. For example, the way in which I love my wife is seemingly very different from the way I love my mother, my child, and my friend. This task has typically proceeded hand-in-hand with philosophical analyses of these kinds of personal love, analyses that in part respond to various puzzles about love. Can love be justified? If so, how? What is the value of personal...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Cognitive Disability and Moral Status

[Revised entry by David Wasserman, Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein, and Daniel Putnam on August 11, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Why are cognitive disability and moral
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[Revised entry by David Wasserman, Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein, and Daniel Putnam on August 11, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Why are cognitive disability and moral status thought to be sufficiently connected to warrant a separate entry? The reason is that individuals with cognitive disabilities have served as test cases in debates about the moral relevance of possessing such intellectual attributes as self-consciousness and practical rationality. If a significant portion of human beings lacks self-consciousness and practical rationality, then those attributes cannot by themselves distinguish the way we treat cognitively developed human beings from...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Work & Vacation

Most Americans do not use their vacation days, despite the fact that they tend to get less than their European counterparts. A variety of plausible reasons have been advanced for this, most of which
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Most Americans do not use their vacation days, despite the fact that they tend to get less than their European counterparts. A variety of plausible reasons have been advanced for this, most of which reveal interesting facts about working in the United States. As would be expected, fear is a major factor. Even when a worker is guaranteed paid vacation time as part of their compensation for work, many workers are afraid that using this vacation time will harm them. One worry is that by using this time, they will show that they are not needed or are inferior to workers that do not take as much (or any) time and hence will be passed up for advancement or even fired. On this view, vacation days are a trap—while they are offered and the worker has earned them, to use them all would sabotage or end the person’s employment. This is not to say that all or even many employers intentionally set a vacation day trap—in fact, many employers seem to have to take special effort to get their employees. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

<strong>Freud the philosopher</strong>. Before psychoanalysis, he was primarily concerned with destroying what was then an intellectual orthodoxy: mind-body dualism

Freud the philosopher. Before psychoanalysis, he was primarily concerned with destroying what was then an intellectual orthodoxy: mind-body
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Freud the philosopher. Before psychoanalysis, he was primarily concerned with destroying what was then an intellectual orthodoxy: mind-body dualism

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

&ldquo;&lsquo;Hardness&rsquo; has not been in our century a quality much admired in women," wrote <strong>Joan Didion</strong>. Yet she was among a cadre of women renowned for the unemotional clarity of her writing

&amp;ldquo;&amp;lsquo;Hardness&amp;rsquo; has not been in our century a quality much admired in women,&quot; wrote Joan Didion. Yet she was among a cadre of women renowned for the unemotional clarity of her
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“‘Hardness’ has not been in our century a quality much admired in women," wrote Joan Didion. Yet she was among a cadre of women renowned for the unemotional clarity of her writing

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Dmitry Bykov</strong>&rsquo;s work has baffled non-Russian-speaking critics. But understanding the author of &ldquo;How Putin Became President of the USA,&rdquo; among other fairy tales, is worth the effort

Dmitry Bykov&amp;rsquo;s work has baffled non-Russian-speaking critics. But understanding the author of &amp;ldquo;How Putin Became President of the USA,&amp;rdquo; among other fairy tales, is worth the
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Dmitry Bykov’s work has baffled non-Russian-speaking critics. But understanding the author of “How Putin Became President of the USA,” among other fairy tales, is worth the effort

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Nietzsche's Earth: Great Events, Great Politics

2017.08.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gary Shapiro, Nietzsche&#39;s Earth: Great Events, Great Politics, University of Chicago Press, 2016, xvi + 238pp., $45.00 (hbk),
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2017.08.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gary Shapiro, Nietzsche's Earth: Great Events, Great Politics, University of Chicago Press, 2016, xvi + 238pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226394459 Reviewed by Gabriel Zamosc, University of Colorado Denver This book offers a valuable and provocative contribution to the growing literature on Nietzsche's political philosophy. It invites us to understand Nietzsche's politics as consisting mainly in a kind of political program calling for a radical transformation of our earthly habitation. On Shapiro's reading, this program principally requires reconceiving our relation to temporality, and, in particular, to the future, by cultivating a kind of openness that can make us receptive to those rare opportunities for radical change Nietzsche called "great events". Nietzsche's politics of futurity, however, requires displacing the way of thinking prevalent in the petty politics of nation-states. In each chapter, Shapiro. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Isaac Polqar

[New Entry by Racheli Haliva on August 10, 2017.] Isaac (Yitzḥak) Polqar was a Jewish Averroist who was active in northern Spain from the second half of the thirteenth century and the first half of
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[New Entry by Racheli Haliva on August 10, 2017.] Isaac (Yitzḥak) Polqar was a Jewish Averroist who was active in northern Spain from the second half of the thirteenth century and the first half of the fourteenth century. Jewish Averroism refers in this context to Jewish philosophers from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century, whose worldview had two main characteristics: firstly, they adopted the philosophy of Ibn Rushd (Averroes), whom they considered the best interpreter of Aristotle. Secondly, they interpreted Judaism in light of Averroes' Aristotelianism on the assumption that...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy