You probably know of <strong>Charles and Ray Eames</strong> for their furniture design. But they also made more than 125 films. Why? &ldquo;To get across an idea&rdquo;

You probably know of Charles and Ray Eames for their furniture design. But they also made more than 125 films. Why? &amp;ldquo;To get across an
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You probably know of Charles and Ray Eames for their furniture design. But they also made more than 125 films. Why? “To get across an idea”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the 'We'

2017.06.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Thomas Szanto and Dermot Moran (eds.), Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the &#39;We&#39;, Routledge, 2016, 337pp., $148.00 (hbk),
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2017.06.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Thomas Szanto and Dermot Moran (eds.), Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the 'We', Routledge, 2016, 337pp., $148.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138918795. Reviewed by Hans Bernhard Schmid, University of Vienna Phenomenology was big at the beginning of the 20th century, but it started to lose its leading role to other strands and movements of philosophical research in the second half -- resulting not just in a change of methods and styles, but also in a change of topics. Over the past few decades, however, one after another of the classical phenomenological research topics have reappeared on the philosophical agenda -- starting with intentionality and consciousness, current "phenomenological" issues extend to such topics as social cognition and emotion, collective intentionality, joint action, group agency, and social ontology. These issues, however, are often explored without reference to -- or perhaps sometimes. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice

2017.06.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Terry Pinkard, Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice, Harvard University Press, 2017, 272pp.,
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2017.06.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Terry Pinkard, Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice, Harvard University Press, 2017, 272pp., $49.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674971776. Reviewed by Christopher Yeomans, Purdue University Terry Pinkard's long-awaited contribution to the debate over the interpretation and contemporary significance of Hegel's theory of history does not disappoint. In many respects, this seems the book Pinkard was destined to write for us, combining as it does the masterful storytelling of both his Hegel biography and his book on Hegel's Phenomenology with his post-Kantian reading of Hegel's core thoughts on self-consciousness (e.g., in Hegel's Naturalism).[1] When one considers Pinkard's recent work alongside Paul Redding's on Hegel's philosophy of religion[2] and Robert Pippin's recent work on modern art,[3] one feels that the dominant program in Hegel studies over... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Neuroscientists working on <strong>the &ldquo;hard problem&rdquo; of consciousness</strong> may be doomed to fail. But there is meaning &mdash; even pleasure &mdash; in the Sisyphean task

Neuroscientists working on the &amp;ldquo;hard problem&amp;rdquo; of consciousness may be doomed to fail. But there is meaning &amp;mdash; even pleasure &amp;mdash; in the Sisyphean
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Neuroscientists working on the “hard problem” of consciousness may be doomed to fail. But there is meaning — even pleasure — in the Sisyphean task

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

At least since Orwell, <strong>bad writing</strong> has been linked with bad politics. But is good writing really a panacea for social, economic, legal, and political ills?

At least since Orwell, bad writing has been linked with bad politics. But is good writing really a panacea for social, economic, legal, and political
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At least since Orwell, bad writing has been linked with bad politics. But is good writing really a panacea for social, economic, legal, and political ills?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

As Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote, &ldquo;The intellect is a muscle; it must be exercised.&rdquo; But that exercise varies. Consider the <strong>reading habits of book critics</strong>

As Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote, &amp;ldquo;The intellect is a muscle; it must be exercised.&amp;rdquo; But that exercise varies. Consider the reading habits of book
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As Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote, “The intellect is a muscle; it must be exercised.” But that exercise varies. Consider the reading habits of book critics

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends

2017.06.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Alex Sager (ed.), The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends, Rowman and Littlefield, 2016, 276pp.,
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2017.06.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Alex Sager (ed.), The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends, Rowman and Littlefield, 2016, 276pp., $39.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781783486137. Reviewed by Stefan Schlegel, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity It is not an easy task to give focus to a book with the title "The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends". Alex Sager does a great job of framing such a vast issue in the first and the last chapter. The setting in which he stages the book is one in which migration is still seen as something pathological, and nations not only as natural and given but also as largely benevolent institutions. As he notes in his introduction, "the history of humanity is a history of mobility, but political philosophy has often operated under the assumption of stasis in which migration is ignored or treated as pathological and exceptional". In. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

In 1965 a young <em>New Yorker</em> writer&rsquo;s story ideas were rejected, one after another by the editor. Finally he said, &ldquo;<strong>Oranges</strong>.&rdquo; &ldquo;That&rsquo;s very good,&rdquo; replied William Shawn

In 1965 a young New Yorker writer&amp;rsquo;s story ideas were rejected, one after another by the editor. Finally he said, &amp;ldquo;Oranges.&amp;rdquo; &amp;ldquo;That&amp;rsquo;s very good,&amp;rdquo; replied William
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In 1965 a young New Yorker writer’s story ideas were rejected, one after another by the editor. Finally he said, “Oranges.” “That’s very good,” replied William Shawn

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Why we act as we do</strong>: neurons, neurotransmitters, hormones, teachers, peers, and society. Yet every &ldquo;cause&rdquo; of our behavior is linked to dozens of other variables

Why we act as we do: neurons, neurotransmitters, hormones, teachers, peers, and society. Yet every &amp;ldquo;cause&amp;rdquo; of our behavior is linked to dozens of other
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Why we act as we do: neurons, neurotransmitters, hormones, teachers, peers, and society. Yet every “cause” of our behavior is linked to dozens of other variables

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

It&rsquo;s one thing to preserve a painting, quite another to preserve art made from bologna or bubble gum. <strong>Should art be made to last</strong>?

It&amp;rsquo;s one thing to preserve a painting, quite another to preserve art made from bologna or bubble gum. Should art be made to
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It’s one thing to preserve a painting, quite another to preserve art made from bologna or bubble gum. Should art be made to last?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily