Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

[Revised entry by Andrew Brennan on May 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A handy tool in the search for precise definitions is the specification of necessary and/or sufficient
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[Revised entry by Andrew Brennan on May 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A handy tool in the search for precise definitions is the specification of necessary and/or sufficient conditions for the application of a term, the use of a concept, or the occurrence of some phenomenon or event. For example, without water and oxygen, there would be no human life; hence these things are necessary conditions for the existence of human beings. Cockneys, according to the traditional definition, are all and only those born within the sound...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Veronica Forrest-Thomson </strong>wrote one volume of criticism before dying at 27. Her ideas are so central that we&rsquo;ve lost sight of her

Veronica Forrest-Thomson wrote one volume of criticism before dying at 27. Her ideas are so central that we&amp;rsquo;ve lost sight of
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Veronica Forrest-Thomson wrote one volume of criticism before dying at 27. Her ideas are so central that we’ve lost sight of her

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Douglas Coupland gave Generation X its name and became its voice. Then he suffered the fate of most <strong>voices of generations</strong>: He became irrelevant&nbsp;

Douglas Coupland gave Generation X its name and became its voice. Then he suffered the fate of most voices of generations: He became
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Douglas Coupland gave Generation X its name and became its voice. Then he suffered the fate of most voices of generations: He became irrelevant 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

For four days at a sold-out, $1,250-per-ticket conference at a Boston hotel, content marketers offered a vision of the <strong>future of media</strong>. It's terrifying

For four days at a sold-out, $1,250-per-ticket conference at a Boston hotel, content marketers offered a vision of the future of media. It&#39;s
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For four days at a sold-out, $1,250-per-ticket conference at a Boston hotel, content marketers offered a vision of the future of media. It's terrifying

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Self-Reflection for the Opaque Mind: An Essay in Neo-Sellarsian Philosophy

2017.05.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews T. Parent, Self-Reflection for the Opaque Mind: An Essay in Neo-Sellarsian Philosophy, Routledge, 2017, 296pp., $140.00 (hbk),
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2017.05.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews T. Parent, Self-Reflection for the Opaque Mind: An Essay in Neo-Sellarsian Philosophy, Routledge, 2017, 296pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138668826. Reviewed by Ryan Cox, University of Hamburg The aim of this book is to defend a solution to what T. Parent calls "the Problem of Wayward Reflection" (p. 36). The problem is that critical self-reflection -- the activity of reflecting on, and evaluating our own attitudes from the armchair -- is rational only if we can reliably know our own attitudes from the armchair, and yet, it seems that we cannot reliably know our own attitudes from the armchair. On the face of it, critical self-reflection is 'an important part of our intellectual and moral lives' (p. 35). Part of the value of critical self-reflection is that it can 'expose skewed priorities, inconsistencies, non-sequiturs in reasoning, and so forth' (p. 35). However, evidence from empirical psychology seems to. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Teaching and Research Fellow in Philosophy, UCD Dublin (10 month temporary, from 1 Sept 2017)

Job List:&amp;nbsp; Europe Name of institution:&amp;nbsp; University College
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
University College Dublin
Town: 
Dublin
Country: 
Ireland
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Stockpiling Vulnerabilities

Embed from Getty Images In May of 2017 the Wannacry Ransomware swept across the world, impacting thousands of computers. The attack affected hospitals, businesses, and universities and the damage
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Embed from Getty Images In May of 2017 the Wannacry Ransomware swept across the world, impacting thousands of computers. The attack affected hospitals, businesses, and universities and the damage has yet to be fully calculated. While any such large-scale attack is a matter of concern, the Wannacry incident is especially interesting. This is because the foundation of the attack was stolen from the National Security Agency of the United States. This raises an important moral issue, namely whether states should stockpile knowledge of software vulnerabilities and the software to exploit them. A stock argument for states maintaining such stockpiles is the same as the argument used to justify stockpiling weapons such as tanks and aircraft. The general idea is that such stockpiles are needed for national security: to protect and advance the interests of the state. In the case of exploiting vulnerabilities for spying, the security argument can be tweaked a bit by drawing an analogy to. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Laura Kipnis goes in search of that rare thing, a <strong>memoir of midlife</strong> with no epiphanies and no life lessons. Nothing&rsquo;s figured out and nothing gets better&nbsp;

Laura Kipnis goes in search of that rare thing, a memoir of midlife with no epiphanies and no life lessons. Nothing&amp;rsquo;s figured out and nothing gets
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Laura Kipnis goes in search of that rare thing, a memoir of midlife with no epiphanies and no life lessons. Nothing’s figured out and nothing gets better 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Forget &ldquo;less is more.&rdquo; History shows that &ldquo;<strong>more is more</strong>&rdquo; &mdash; a saying attributed to an architect, a fashion designer, a novelist, and Dolly Parton&nbsp;

Forget &amp;ldquo;less is more.&amp;rdquo; History shows that &amp;ldquo;more is more&amp;rdquo; &amp;mdash; a saying attributed to an architect, a fashion designer, a novelist, and Dolly
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Forget “less is more.” History shows that “more is more” — a saying attributed to an architect, a fashion designer, a novelist, and Dolly Parton 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

&ldquo;The past is yours, to keep invisible if you wish,&rdquo; wrote <strong>John Ashbery</strong>. His own past is quite public, including a 1,000-page teenage diary

&amp;ldquo;The past is yours, to keep invisible if you wish,&amp;rdquo; wrote John Ashbery. His own past is quite public, including a 1,000-page teenage
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“The past is yours, to keep invisible if you wish,” wrote John Ashbery. His own past is quite public, including a 1,000-page teenage diary

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily