In Memoriam: Marilyn McCord Adams (1943-2017)

Christina Van Dyke shares the following: Marilyn McCord Adams passed away early morning on March 22, 2017. She was an uncompromisingly fierce person: in her scholarship, in her pursuit of justice
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Christina Van Dyke shares the following: Marilyn McCord Adams passed away early morning on March 22, 2017. She was an uncompromisingly fierce person: in her scholarship, in her pursuit of justice for the marginalized, in her wickedly awesome sense of humor, and in her love for God, Bob (her husband), and her friends.   Marilyn [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

RIP Marilyn McCord Adams

We learned yesterday of the death of Marilyn McCord Adams. She is the second of the SCP giants to fall (the earlier being Bill Alston). No one living, in my view, can fill their shoes. Those of us
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We learned yesterday of the death of Marilyn McCord Adams. She is the second of the SCP giants to fall (the earlier being Bill Alston). No one living, in my view, can fill their shoes. Those of us who studied at their feet first- or second-hand will spend the rest of our lives simply working [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Why Inequality Matters: Luck Egalitarianism, Its Meaning and Value

2017.03.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Shlomi Segall, Why Inequality Matters: Luck Egalitarianism, Its Meaning and Value, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 256pp.,
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2017.03.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Shlomi Segall, Why Inequality Matters: Luck Egalitarianism, Its Meaning and Value, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 256pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107129818. Reviewed by Alex Voorhoeve, London School of Economics Shlomi Segall's new book contains many novel ideas. It should engage researchers with an interest in debates between luck egalitarians and two of their principal opponents, prioritarians and sufficientarians.[1] While, as I shall argue below, not all of its arguments succeed, it also makes contributions which deserve to profoundly influence debates on distributive justice. I will first summarize the book's central points and then evaluate some of its arguments. Segall's project is to offer a theory of the value of a distribution of well-being. This theory is meant to establish what decision-makers should do insofar as their proper aim is to maximize this value (or to maximize expected value, if. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

"Paying attention is the only thing that guarantees insight. It is the only real weapon we have against power, too." Michelle Dean on why <strong>paying attention is a moral obligation</strong>

&quot;Paying attention is the only thing that guarantees insight. It is the only real weapon we have against power, too.&quot; Michelle Dean on why paying attention is a moral
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"Paying attention is the only thing that guarantees insight. It is the only real weapon we have against power, too." Michelle Dean on why paying attention is a moral obligation

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>The novel has been declared dead</strong> so many times that such arguments are less interesting than theories about why they keep being made

The novel has been declared dead so many times that such arguments are less interesting than theories about why they keep being
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The novel has been declared dead so many times that such arguments are less interesting than theories about why they keep being made

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What made <strong>Marianne Moore&rsquo;s poetry</strong> modern? Her patriotism, feminism, morality, and queer-family experience. Along with her participation in a cultural genocide

What made Marianne Moore&amp;rsquo;s poetry modern? Her patriotism, feminism, morality, and queer-family experience. Along with her participation in a cultural
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What made Marianne Moore’s poetry modern? Her patriotism, feminism, morality, and queer-family experience. Along with her participation in a cultural genocide

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Philosophy of Emerging Media: Understanding, Appreciation, Application

2017.03.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Juliet Floyd and James E. Katz (eds.), Philosophy of Emerging Media: Understanding, Appreciation, Application, Oxford University
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2017.03.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Juliet Floyd and James E. Katz (eds.), Philosophy of Emerging Media: Understanding, Appreciation, Application, Oxford University Press, 2016, 466pp., $39.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190260750. Reviewed by Val Dusek, University of New Hampshire This work is a genuine contribution to showcasing philosophical thought about big data and the internet, (including e-mail, Skype, and social media, such as Facebook and Snapchat, among other platforms). It also includes discussion of less novel media, such as photography. It treats various media without basing itself solely on a single postmodern or Heideggerian approach, as do many cultural studies works on the topic. It utilizes Anglo-American linguistic philosophy, a variety of French approaches and a bit of process philosophy. This work is much more philosophical than most recent books on media since Hubert Dreyfus' and Michael Heim's books, both based primarily on. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

In the darkness, she saw her father perched on a ledge. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m going to jump!&rdquo; he yelled. Her mother replied, &ldquo;Why don&rsquo;t you?&rdquo; Just another night in the <strong>Tynan household</strong>

In the darkness, she saw her father perched on a ledge. &amp;ldquo;I&amp;rsquo;m going to jump!&amp;rdquo; he yelled. Her mother replied, &amp;ldquo;Why don&amp;rsquo;t you?&amp;rdquo; Just another night in the Tynan
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In the darkness, she saw her father perched on a ledge. “I’m going to jump!” he yelled. Her mother replied, “Why don’t you?” Just another night in the Tynan household

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Medicine & Markets

Embed from Getty Images As a point of ideology, many conservatives advocate the broad application of free market principles. One key part of this ideology is the opposition of regulation, at least
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Embed from Getty Images As a point of ideology, many conservatives advocate the broad application of free market principles. One key part of this ideology is the opposition of regulation, at least regulation that does not favor businesses. Since health care is regarded as a business in the United States, there is an interesting question in regards to the extent that health care pricing should be regulated by the state. Because of the high cost of health care in the United States, there have been proposals to place limits on the cost of health care services. Some areas have implemented such proposals, but there is a general lack of such regulations on pricing. Those who oppose such regulations often contend that pricing should be set by free competition between health care providers and that consumers of health care should be savvy shoppers. The idea is that savvy health care shoppers will take their business to providers that offer better services or lower costs, which will force. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Spelling and knowhow: the oddest English spellings, part 23

We are so used to the horrors of English spelling that experience no inconvenience at reading the word knowhow. Why don’t know and how rhyme if they look so similar? Because such is life. The post
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We are so used to the horrors of English spelling that experience no inconvenience at reading the word knowhow. Why don’t know and how rhyme if they look so similar? Because such is life. In addition to the ignominious bow, as in low bow, one can have two strings to one’s bow, and I witnessed an incident at a hockey game, when a certain Mr. Prow kicked up a row, complaining of an inconvenient row, but the crowd pacified him, and, as a result, he had to eat crow. By the way, the man’s family name Prow, as he later told me, is pronounced with the vowel of grow, not of prowess or proud. In return, I explained to him that prow (a ship’s forepart) rhymed with grow for centuries and then changed its pronunciation, perhaps to align itself with bow (which bow? Its synonym of course) or for another equally obscure reason (see below). Such changes are trivial. More surprising is the fact that millions of people who are ready to protest anything on the slightest provocation tolerate English. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog