Informing People About Their Genetic Risks

Jan Deckers and Dominic Hall ask whether relatives of patients with a genetic disease should be told that they themselves are at an increased
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Jan Deckers and Dominic Hall ask whether relatives of patients with a genetic disease should be told that they themselves are at an increased risk.

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News source: Philosophy Now

Eating Stupid Pigs

Marco Kaisth asks, could radical genetic engineering create ethical factory
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Marco Kaisth asks, could radical genetic engineering create ethical factory farms?

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News source: Philosophy Now

Are Designer Babies Our Future?

Keith Tidman overhears a prophetic dialogue about the pluses and minuses of genetically engineering
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Keith Tidman overhears a prophetic dialogue about the pluses and minuses of genetically engineering children.

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News source: Philosophy Now

News: April/May 2017

Tom Regan, who made case for animal rights, dead at 78 • App developer says Everything is Philosophy • Bright kids “no more moral” — News reports by Anja
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Tom Regan, who made case for animal rights, dead at 78 • App developer says Everything is Philosophy • Bright kids “no more moral” — News reports by Anja Steinbauer

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News source: Philosophy Now

Isaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment

2017.03.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Laurence Brockliss and Ritchie Robertson (eds.), Isaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment, Oxford University Press, 2016, 258pp.,
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2017.03.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Laurence Brockliss and Ritchie Robertson (eds.), Isaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment, Oxford University Press, 2016, 258pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198783930. Reviewed by Charles Blattberg, Université de Montréal The fox, it seems, was wrong about many things. Isaiah Berlin's accounts of Marx are "all flawed in non-trivial ways," writes David Leopold (p. 23). And "there is no doubt that he penned a few [falsehoods] about Hume," asserts P.J.E. Kail (p. 69). Karen O'Brien tells us that "Berlin does not provide anything resembling an accurate or rounded account of Montesquieu's thought," while Christopher Brooke complains that "Berlin never seems to have felt that he really had to engage with Rousseau as a serious theorist" (pp. 79, 93). Marian Hobson concludes that Berlin is mistaken to think that either Diderot or Hamann "fit into a simple category" (p. 112). Ritchie Robertson insists that Berlin would have. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

"The desire to cleanse the campus of dissident voices has become something of a mission," says <strong>Robert Boyers.</strong> Shaming, scapegoating, and periodic ritual exorcisms are a prime feature of academic life

&quot;The desire to cleanse the campus of dissident voices has become something of a mission,&quot; says Robert Boyers. Shaming, scapegoating, and periodic ritual exorcisms are a prime feature of academic
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"The desire to cleanse the campus of dissident voices has become something of a mission," says Robert Boyers. Shaming, scapegoating, and periodic ritual exorcisms are a prime feature of academic life

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Orchestra after the Anschluss.</strong> It was mostly business as usual for the Vienna and Berlin Philharmonics. But a surreal otherworldliness echoed inside and outside the concert halls

Orchestra after the Anschluss. It was mostly business as usual for the Vienna and Berlin Philharmonics. But a surreal otherworldliness echoed inside and outside the concert
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Orchestra after the Anschluss. It was mostly business as usual for the Vienna and Berlin Philharmonics. But a surreal otherworldliness echoed inside and outside the concert halls

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Struggling with scholasticism</strong> and overloaded with internal issues, philosophy has turned away from the real world. To rediscover its relevance, it needs to be rebooted

Struggling with scholasticism and overloaded with internal issues, philosophy has turned away from the real world. To rediscover its relevance, it needs to be
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Struggling with scholasticism and overloaded with internal issues, philosophy has turned away from the real world. To rediscover its relevance, it needs to be rebooted

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Darwinism as Religion: What Literature Tells Us About Evolution

2017.03.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael Ruse, Darwinism as Religion: What Literature Tells Us About Evolution, Oxford University Press, 2017, 310pp., $34.95
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2017.03.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael Ruse, Darwinism as Religion: What Literature Tells Us About Evolution, Oxford University Press, 2017, 310pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190241025. Reviewed by Ian Hesketh, The University of Queensland Michael Ruse is a well-known authority in the history and philosophy of evolution, particularly that of Darwinism. While he is by training and self-identification a philosopher, his particular mode of philosophy is decidedly historical in the sense that his arguments are typically developed out of an engagement with historical evidence and narrative. His first book, The Darwinian Revolution (1979), is a wonderful example of his historical-philosophical method at work as he situated the sudden rise of Darwinian evolution within the particular social, cultural, and philosophical contexts of Victorian Britain. In Monad to Man (1996), Ruse extended his history of evolution into the twentieth century while. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News