Intellectuals are unreliable students of <strong>populism</strong>, finding it too prone to ignorance and demagogy. Beware anyone who claims to speak for "the people," but listen

Intellectuals are unreliable students of populism, finding it too prone to ignorance and demagogy. Beware anyone who claims to speak for &quot;the people,&quot; but
Philosophy News image
Intellectuals are unreliable students of populism, finding it too prone to ignorance and demagogy. Beware anyone who claims to speak for "the people," but listen

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Did <strong>Jane Austen </strong>weave clues into her novels of her secret, radical politics? No, but her wit and wisdom were radical in and of themselves

Did Jane Austen weave clues into her novels of her secret, radical politics? No, but her wit and wisdom were radical in and of
Philosophy News image
Did Jane Austen weave clues into her novels of her secret, radical politics? No, but her wit and wisdom were radical in and of themselves

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>How writers write</strong>. For Kingsley Amis, it was simply about applying the seat of his pants to the seat of his chair

How writers write. For Kingsley Amis, it was simply about applying the seat of his pants to the seat of his
Philosophy News image
How writers write. For Kingsley Amis, it was simply about applying the seat of his pants to the seat of his chair

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Unity of Science

[Revised entry by Jordi Cat on August 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The topic of unity in the sciences can be explored through the following questions: Is there one privileged,
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Jordi Cat on August 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The topic of unity in the sciences can be explored through the following questions: Is there one privileged, most basic or fundamental concept or kind of thing, and if not, how are the different concepts or kinds of things in the universe related? Can the various natural sciences (e.g.,physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology) be unified into a single overarching theory, and can theories within a single science (e.g., general relativity and quantum theory in...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Trump’s White Nationalists, Again

On the face of it, condemning white supremacists and neo-Nazis is one of the politically easiest things to do. Trump, however, seems incapable of engaging in this simple task. Instead, he has
Philosophy News image
On the face of it, condemning white supremacists and neo-Nazis is one of the politically easiest things to do. Trump, however, seems incapable of engaging in this simple task. Instead, he has continued to act in ways that lend support to the alt-right. After a delayed and reluctant condemnation of the alt-right, Trump returned to his lane by making two claims. The first is the claim that “there is blame on both sides.” The second is the claim that there are good people on both sides. On the face of it, both claims are false. That said, these claims will be given more consideration than they deserve. If one accepts a very broad concept of blame, then it would be possible to claim that there is blame on both sides. This could be done in the following way. The first step is asserting that a side is responsible if an event would not have taken place without its involvement. This is based, of course, on the notion that accountability is a matter of “but for.” In the case at hand, the. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Talking Philosophy

Embodiment, Enaction, and Culture: Investigating the Constitution of the Shared World

2017.08.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christoph Durt, Thomas Fuchs, and Christian Tewes (eds.), Embodiment, Enaction, and Culture: Investigating the Constitution of
Philosophy News image
2017.08.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christoph Durt, Thomas Fuchs, and Christian Tewes (eds.), Embodiment, Enaction, and Culture: Investigating the Constitution of the Shared World, MIT Press, 2016, 456pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262035552.   Reviewed by Bryce Huebner, Georgetown University This volume was written at the conclusion of a European research network project called Toward an Embodied Science of InterSubjectivity. Over the course of 20 chapters and an introduction, it develops resources for thinking about embodiment and culture. And since the authors have "collaborated for years" (10), their papers display a great deal of theoretical unity. But unity comes at a cost: nearby stones are left unturned, and competing views are often rejected too quickly. Nonetheless, the book provides a clear account of what enactivism amounts to, what it takes for granted, and how far it can be pushed -- and overall, that's a good thing.   The volume. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

A dream of Utopia, an Eden of innocence, and then the Fall: The <strong>Summer of Love </strong>was about the pursuit of pleasure. But there was a puritan streak, too

A dream of Utopia, an Eden of innocence, and then the Fall: The Summer of Love was about the pursuit of pleasure. But there was a puritan streak,
Philosophy News image
A dream of Utopia, an Eden of innocence, and then the Fall: The Summer of Love was about the pursuit of pleasure. But there was a puritan streak, too

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Toscanini's quasi-religious consecration to music fueled an obsessive and often miserable struggle to realize his vision of <strong>artistic perfection</strong>

Toscanini&#39;s quasi-religious consecration to music fueled an obsessive and often miserable struggle to realize his vision of artistic
Philosophy News image
Toscanini's quasi-religious consecration to music fueled an obsessive and often miserable struggle to realize his vision of artistic perfection

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Michiko Kakutani</strong>&ndash; feared, respected, mercurial &ndash; is stepping away from her role at <em>The Times</em>. Is this the dawn of a new age of book reviewing?

Michiko Kakutani&amp;ndash; feared, respected, mercurial &amp;ndash; is stepping away from her role at The Times. Is this the dawn of a new age of book
Philosophy News image
Michiko Kakutani– feared, respected, mercurial – is stepping away from her role at The Times. Is this the dawn of a new age of book reviewing?

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Victor Stenger: Nuthin’ to Explain

This is a guest article by the late&#160;Victor J Stenger, emeritus professor of physics at the University of Hawaii and adjunct professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado, originally
Philosophy News image
This is a guest article by the late Victor J Stenger, emeritus professor of physics at the University of Hawaii and adjunct professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado, originally published on April 18, 2012.        Nuthin’ to Explain Victor J. Stenger When you ain’t got nuthin’ You got nuthin’ to explain -Bob Dylan (paraphrase)   In a recent book called A Universe From Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing, cosmologist Larry Krauss describes how our universe could have arisen naturally from a pre-existing structureless void he calls “nothing.”[1] He bases his argument on quantum physics, along with now well-established results from elementary particle physics and cosmology. In an afterword, atheist Richard Dawkins exults, “Even the last remaining trump card of the theologian, ‘Why is there something rather than nothing?’ shrivels up before your eyes as you read these pages.”[2] Philosopher David Albert will have none of it. In a review in the New York. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Talking Philosophy