After decades of literary labor, <strong>Bulgakov </strong>had published little: some short stories, part of a novel. The problem? His failure to understand what was wanted from his work

After decades of literary labor, Bulgakov had published little: some short stories, part of a novel. The problem? His failure to understand what was wanted from his
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After decades of literary labor, Bulgakov had published little: some short stories, part of a novel. The problem? His failure to understand what was wanted from his work

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

God and the Meanings of Life: What God Could and Couldn't Do to Make Our Lives More Meaningful,

2017.06.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews T. J. Mawson, God and the Meanings of Life: What God Could and Couldn&#39;t Do to Make Our Lives More Meaningful, Bloomsbury, 2016,
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2017.06.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews T. J. Mawson, God and the Meanings of Life: What God Could and Couldn't Do to Make Our Lives More Meaningful, Bloomsbury, 2016, 240pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781474212540. Reviewed by Craig G. Bartholomew, Redeemer University College The last twenty-five years or so have witnessed a remarkable renaissance of interest among a minority of analytical philosophers in the question of the meaning of life, and this monograph provides a substantial contribution to that discussion. T. J. Mawson explains and affirms the legitimacy of the renaissance of interest in this question (Chapter 1), rightly insisting that the question cannot and should not be reduced to emotion and subjectivity, and helpfully positions his views throughout within the current debate. As the plural "Meanings" in the title indicates, a significant concern of Mawson's is to tease out and assess the variety of questions involved in the question of. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Politics run through <strong>Shakespeare&rsquo;s plays</strong>, but we know little of his own political opinions. His characters speak, they do not lecture. Yet certain themes recur

Politics run through Shakespeare&amp;rsquo;s plays, but we know little of his own political opinions. His characters speak, they do not lecture. Yet certain themes
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Politics run through Shakespeare’s plays, but we know little of his own political opinions. His characters speak, they do not lecture. Yet certain themes recur

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Omnipotence

[Revised entry by Joshua Hoffman and Gary Rosenkrantz on June 22, 2017. Changes to: Bibliography, notes.html] Omnipotence is maximal power. Maximal greatness (or perfection) includes omnipotence.
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[Revised entry by Joshua Hoffman and Gary Rosenkrantz on June 22, 2017. Changes to: Bibliography, notes.html] Omnipotence is maximal power. Maximal greatness (or perfection) includes omnipotence. According to traditional Western theism, God is maximally great (or perfect), and therefore is omnipotent. Omnipotence seems puzzling, even paradoxical, to many philosophers. They wonder, for example, whether God can create a spherical cube, or make a stone so massive that he cannot move it. Is there a consistent analysis of omnipotence? What are the implications of such an analysis for the nature of God?...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Whose bohemia</strong>? Ida Nettleship married the painter Augustus John, had five children, competed with his 21-year-old muse, and went unmentioned in his memoir

Whose bohemia? Ida Nettleship married the painter Augustus John, had five children, competed with his 21-year-old muse, and went unmentioned in his
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Whose bohemia? Ida Nettleship married the painter Augustus John, had five children, competed with his 21-year-old muse, and went unmentioned in his memoir

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Mickey Mouse, Jack the Ripper, Proust, mutton chops, ghost stories, comics: <strong>Joachim Kalka </strong>can write interestingly about almost anything

Mickey Mouse, Jack the Ripper, Proust, mutton chops, ghost stories, comics: Joachim Kalka can write interestingly about almost
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Mickey Mouse, Jack the Ripper, Proust, mutton chops, ghost stories, comics: Joachim Kalka can write interestingly about almost anything

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Float nude in saltwater, pee in a gold toilet, lounge in a field of phalluses. <strong>Participatory art </strong>preys on our narcissism. Is that a bad thing?

Float nude in saltwater, pee in a gold toilet, lounge in a field of phalluses. Participatory art preys on our narcissism. Is that a bad
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Float nude in saltwater, pee in a gold toilet, lounge in a field of phalluses. Participatory art preys on our narcissism. Is that a bad thing?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Modal Justification via Theories

2017.06. : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews abc Read
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2017.06. : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews abc Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

teorema Essay Prize for Young Scholars 2017

The Spanish Philosophy journal teorema is pleased to announce an essay com-petition for young scholars. The winner will receive 1500.00 €, and the essay will be published and acknowledged as winner
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The Spanish Philosophy journal teorema is pleased to announce an essay com-petition for young scholars. The winner will receive 1500.00 €, and the essay will be published and acknowledged as winner in the journal. Topic: Knowledge-First Epistemology and Decision Theory. According to a recent idea developed by the approach known as “knowledge-first epistemology”, the evidence available to a subject at a time t consists of the propositions the subject knows. Together with the view that the rationality of an action is a matter of the evidence available to the agent, the result is that rational action requires knowledge. Is this a defensible view of rational action? If it is not, what is the connection between rational action and belief? Does rational action require rational belief? Does it require less than that: is perhaps mere belief sufficient to rationalize action? More generally, what are the connections between justification, rationality and excusability of both actions and. . .

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Peter Ohlin, philosophy editor at OUP USA, interviews philosopher David Benatar

Peter Ohlin: The title of the new book is The Human Predicament. How would you describe that predicament, in a nutshell? David Benatar: Life is hard. We have to struggle, often unsuccessfully, to
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Peter Ohlin: The title of the new book is The Human Predicament. How would you describe that predicament, in a nutshell? David Benatar: Life is hard. We have to struggle, often unsuccessfully, to keep unpleasantness at bay. It would be easier to make sense of this if life served some important purpose. Yet, while we can create some meaning, our lives lack any ultimate purpose. Death can relieve our suffering, but it cannot solve our problem of meaninglessness. Moreover, because death is annihilation, it is part of our misfortune (even when, all things considered, it is the lesser of two evils). In other words, our predicament is that life is bad but that death is too. PO: How did you become interested in this topic, and how does it connect with your previous book, Better Never to Have Been? DB: Apprehending our predicament commands one’s interest. To be aware of the suffering, the pointlessness of it all, and the grotesque finale seems unavoidably interesting – or, at least, it is to. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy