<strong>Graduate school</strong> is unkind to mind and body. To retain some health, go on dates. Have sex. Come to think of it, the world of online dating is a lot like to the academic job market

Graduate school is unkind to mind and body. To retain some health, go on dates. Have sex. Come to think of it, the world of online dating is a lot like to the academic job
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Graduate school is unkind to mind and body. To retain some health, go on dates. Have sex. Come to think of it, the world of online dating is a lot like to the academic job market

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Post-truth and its discontents</strong>. What is and what isn&rsquo;t a fact has never been obvious or uncontroversial. There was no golden age of truth

Post-truth and its discontents. What is and what isn&amp;rsquo;t a fact has never been obvious or uncontroversial. There was no golden age of
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Post-truth and its discontents. What is and what isn’t a fact has never been obvious or uncontroversial. There was no golden age of truth

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Travel writing</strong> is not all Kerouac and Chatwin. In fact, it doesn&rsquo;t have to involve traveling farther than around a room

Travel writing is not all Kerouac and Chatwin. In fact, it doesn&amp;rsquo;t have to involve traveling farther than around a
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Travel writing is not all Kerouac and Chatwin. In fact, it doesn’t have to involve traveling farther than around a room

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Unity of Consciousness

[Revised entry by Andrew Brook and Paul Raymont on May 19, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Human consciousness usually displays a striking unity. When one experiences a noise and, say,
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[Revised entry by Andrew Brook and Paul Raymont on May 19, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Human consciousness usually displays a striking unity. When one experiences a noise and, say, a pain, one is not conscious of the noise and then, separately, of the pain. One is conscious of the noise and pain together, as aspects of a single conscious experience. Since at least the time of Immanuel Kant (1781/7), this phenomenon has been called the unity of consciousness. More generally, it is consciousness not of A and, separately, of B and, separately, of C, but of...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Virtual Colloquium: Ricki Bliss, “Metaphysical Foundationalism and the Principle of Sufficient Reason”

Welcome to the final installment of the Prosblogion Virtual Colloquium. Many thanks to all of those who have contributed, both as presenters and commenters. Our final paper will be
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Welcome to the final installment of the Prosblogion Virtual Colloquium. Many thanks to all of those who have contributed, both as presenters and commenters. Our final paper will be “Metaphysical Foundationalism and the Principle of Sufficient Reason” by Ricki Bliss. Dr. Bliss received her PhD from the University of Melbourne in 2012 and is currently [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

<strong>The Passion of Michel Foucault</strong>. He was a surrealist, masochist, militant, Maoist, reformist, structuralist, comrade, and lover. He was also suicide-obsessed and hard to ignore

The Passion of Michel Foucault. He was a surrealist, masochist, militant, Maoist, reformist, structuralist, comrade, and lover. He was also suicide-obsessed and hard to
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The Passion of Michel Foucault. He was a surrealist, masochist, militant, Maoist, reformist, structuralist, comrade, and lover. He was also suicide-obsessed and hard to ignore

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Norman Podhoretz</strong> was everywhere: Arendt&rsquo;s New Year&rsquo;s Eve party, Capote&rsquo;s Black and White Ball. He was the wonder boy of the name-dropping circuit. Then he was cast out

Norman Podhoretz was everywhere: Arendt&amp;rsquo;s New Year&amp;rsquo;s Eve party, Capote&amp;rsquo;s Black and White Ball. He was the wonder boy of the name-dropping circuit. Then he was cast
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Norman Podhoretz was everywhere: Arendt’s New Year’s Eve party, Capote’s Black and White Ball. He was the wonder boy of the name-dropping circuit. Then he was cast out

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

A decade ago, highly confessional first-person writing began to flood the internet. Now it&rsquo;s nearly vanished. <strong>What killed the personal essay</strong>?

A decade ago, highly confessional first-person writing began to flood the internet. Now it&amp;rsquo;s nearly vanished. What killed the personal
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A decade ago, highly confessional first-person writing began to flood the internet. Now it’s nearly vanished. What killed the personal essay?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Religion Within Reason

2017.05.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Steven M. Cahn, Religion Within Reason, Columbia University Press, 2017, 105pp., $25.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780231181617. Reviewed
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2017.05.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Steven M. Cahn, Religion Within Reason, Columbia University Press, 2017, 105pp., $25.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780231181617. Reviewed by William J. Wainwright, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Steven Cahn's professed goal is "to provide an acceptable . . . and provocative overview of the sort of challenges philosophy presents to any version of supernatural belief, while also exploring the possibility of religion within a naturalistic framework." He approaches his subject as an atheist who nonetheless finds much to "admire in a religious life as long as its beliefs and practices do not violate the methods and results of scientific inquiry" (p. ix). Chapters 1-15 and 17 are principally devoted to debunking theism. The remainder (Chapters 16, 18, and 19) articulate Cahn's atheistic but religious alternative. To whom is Cahn's book addressed? Not to philosophically sophisticated theists since they are already familiar. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Against Democracy

2017.05.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jason Brennan, Against Democracy, Princeton University Press, 2016, 288pp., $18.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780691178493. Reviewed by
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2017.05.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jason Brennan, Against Democracy, Princeton University Press, 2016, 288pp., $18.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780691178493. Reviewed by Thomas Christiano, University of Arizona Jason Brennan's book is a lively and entertaining exploration of an important pair of questions: (1) how can democracies work when the citizens who are supposed to rule are not very well informed about the substance and form of government and policy? and, (2) can we do better with non-democratic government? The basic difficulty with Brennan's discussion is that he is inclined to proceed from a poorly understood micro-theory of democracy to conclusions about how well democracy works. He doesn't always hold to this -- indeed there are times when he suggests that democracies overall work pretty well and then wonders how this is possible -- but the main thrust of the book starts from the micro-theory, which is simply not strong enough to... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News