<strong>Freud&rsquo;s theories</strong> don&rsquo;t mesh well with modern science. Yet he represents something important for neuroscientists: the possibility that laws govern mental life

Freud&amp;rsquo;s theories don&amp;rsquo;t mesh well with modern science. Yet he represents something important for neuroscientists: the possibility that laws govern mental
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Freud’s theories don’t mesh well with modern science. Yet he represents something important for neuroscientists: the possibility that laws govern mental life

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Toril Moi</strong> believes literary theory has corrosive consequences. She wants to transform the way we think about language. But her version of literary studies has no literature

Toril Moi believes literary theory has corrosive consequences. She wants to transform the way we think about language. But her version of literary studies has no
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Toril Moi believes literary theory has corrosive consequences. She wants to transform the way we think about language. But her version of literary studies has no literature

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Adam Gopnik</strong> has been called a monster of privilege, a &ldquo;pastry fetishist.&rdquo; His response? We don&rsquo;t dismiss Proust for depicting a well-off white man in Paris in the 1880s

Adam Gopnik has been called a monster of privilege, a &amp;ldquo;pastry fetishist.&amp;rdquo; His response? We don&amp;rsquo;t dismiss Proust for depicting a well-off white man in Paris in the
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Adam Gopnik has been called a monster of privilege, a “pastry fetishist.” His response? We don’t dismiss Proust for depicting a well-off white man in Paris in the 1880s

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Selected Writings on Ethics

2017.12.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John Duns Scotus, Selected Writings on Ethics, Thomas Williams (ed., tr.), Oxford University Press, 2017, 384pp, $35.00, ISBN
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2017.12.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John Duns Scotus, Selected Writings on Ethics, Thomas Williams (ed., tr.), Oxford University Press, 2017, 384pp, $35.00, ISBN 9780199673414. Reviewed by Bonnie Kent, University of California, Irvine This anthology by Thomas Williams testifies to his impressive skills, both as an editor and as a translator of Duns Scotus's notoriously troublesome Latin. The texts he includes, many of them never before translated into English, will probably not resolve the long-running dispute about the shape of Scotus's ethical theory as a whole. They should, however, give philosophical interpreters a somewhat clearer picture of his ethics. Philosophers normally judge a translation by consulting the original text to see how well the translator succeeded in capturing its meaning. The original text is fixed; only translations of it vary. Readers of Williams's anthology might be surprised, then, by how often he revises the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The problem of colour

Colours are a familiar and important feature of our experience of the world. Colours help us to distinguish and identify things in our environment: for instance, the red of a berry not only helps us
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Colours are a familiar and important feature of our experience of the world. Colours help us to distinguish and identify things in our environment: for instance, the red of a berry not only helps us to see the berry against the green foliage, but it also allows us to identify it as a berry. Colours perform a wide variety of symbolic functions: red means stop, green means go, white means surrender. They have distinctive personal and cultural associations, and provoke a range of emotional and aesthetic responses that are reflected in the clothes we wear, the way we decorate our houses, and the choices made by designers and artists. But although colours are a familiar feature of the world that we perceive, they are also deeply puzzling. What exactly are colours? Do colours even exist? Colours appear to be properties of things in our environment: apples, clothes, cats, coffee, traffic lights, and so on. Moreover, it is natural to think of them as “objective” properties of. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Why physicists need philosophy

At a party, on a plane, in the locker-room, I’m often asked what I do. Though tempted by one colleague’s adoption of the identity of a steam-pipe fitter, I admit I am a professor of philosophy. If
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At a party, on a plane, in the locker-room, I’m often asked what I do. Though tempted by one colleague’s adoption of the identity of a steam-pipe fitter, I admit I am a professor of philosophy. If that doesn’t end or redirect the conversation, my questioner may continue by raising some current moral or political issue, or asking for my favorite philosopher. The reply “No, I’m not that kind of philosopher, my field is the philosophy of physics” typically induces silence as my interlocutor peers into the chasm separating C.P. Snow’s two cultures while I go on about how Einstein changed basic beliefs about space and time. But now I have to be ready for a different response. “How can philosophers add anything to what physicists have been able to achieve without them? Richard Feynman made fun of philosophy, Steven Weinberg finds it useless, Neil de Grasse Tyson thinks it’s a waste of time, and Larry Krauss and Stephen Hawking say physics has answered big questions about our place in the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Campaigns against "<strong>cultural appropriation</strong>" are bad for politics and bad for art. To put identity over aesthetics is to render art meaningless

Campaigns against &quot;cultural appropriation&quot; are bad for politics and bad for art. To put identity over aesthetics is to render art
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Campaigns against "cultural appropriation" are bad for politics and bad for art. To put identity over aesthetics is to render art meaningless

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Biographers describe <strong>Oscar Wilde</strong> after prison as a broken man, a spent force. Nonsense. Until his final illness, he &ldquo;carried himself with a threadbare majesty&rdquo;

Biographers describe Oscar Wilde after prison as a broken man, a spent force. Nonsense. Until his final illness, he &amp;ldquo;carried himself with a threadbare
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Biographers describe Oscar Wilde after prison as a broken man, a spent force. Nonsense. Until his final illness, he “carried himself with a threadbare majesty”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In her fiction, <strong>Jenny Diski</strong> preferred self-concealment to baring her soul. Yet her life was her material, and, in the end, she was her writing

In her fiction, Jenny Diski preferred self-concealment to baring her soul. Yet her life was her material, and, in the end, she was her
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In her fiction, Jenny Diski preferred self-concealment to baring her soul. Yet her life was her material, and, in the end, she was her writing

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Wedding Cakes & Freedom, Again

Embed from Getty Images The United States Supreme Court is, as of this writing, considering a case involving a wedding cake. The gist of the battle is between the right of freedom of expression and
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Embed from Getty Images The United States Supreme Court is, as of this writing, considering a case involving a wedding cake. The gist of the battle is between the right of freedom of expression and the right to not be discriminated against. One the one side is a Christian baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex wedding based on his religious belief that same-sex marriage is wrong. On the other side is the couple who claim that they are being discriminated against by this refusal. A primary argument being advanced in the baker’s defense is based on the 1st Amendment: being forced to make a cake for a same-sex wedding would violate his freedom of expression. This right of free expression has a clear legal foundation and has very strong moral foundations, courtesy of various philosophical arguments in its favor. But, of course, there are also strong legal and moral foundations for not allowing discrimination against potential customers. While the freedom of expression is. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy