<strong>Good monsters</strong>, like good art, replace conventional ideas with something weird, troubling, and potentially heroic

Good monsters, like good art, replace conventional ideas with something weird, troubling, and potentially
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Good monsters, like good art, replace conventional ideas with something weird, troubling, and potentially heroic

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Should public art be affirmative? <strong>Kara Walker</strong> makes provocative, monumental works that challenge the idea

Should public art be affirmative? Kara Walker makes provocative, monumental works that challenge the
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Should public art be affirmative? Kara Walker makes provocative, monumental works that challenge the idea

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Causal Theories of Mental Content

[Revised entry by Fred Adams and Ken Aizawa on April 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Causal theories of mental content attempt to explain how thoughts can be about
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[Revised entry by Fred Adams and Ken Aizawa on April 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Causal theories of mental content attempt to explain how thoughts can be about things. They attempt to explain how one can think about, for example, dogs. These theories begin with the idea that there are mental representations and that thoughts are meaningful in virtue of a causal connection between a mental representation and some part of the world that is represented. In other words, the point of departure for these theories is that thoughts of dogs are about dogs because dogs cause the mental representations of dogs....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

A dyspeptic crank? The music critic <strong>Virgil Thomson</strong> slept through performances, dismissed beloved works, and reviewed his own compositions. Yet he changed classical music for the better

A dyspeptic crank? The music critic Virgil Thomson slept through performances, dismissed beloved works, and reviewed his own compositions. Yet he changed classical music for the
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A dyspeptic crank? The music critic Virgil Thomson slept through performances, dismissed beloved works, and reviewed his own compositions. Yet he changed classical music for the better

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Why Diane Arbus, John Carpenter, and David Lynch embraced monsters. <strong>Good monsters</strong>, like good art, replace conventional ideas with something weird, troubling, and potentially heroic

Why Diane Arbus, John Carpenter, and David Lynch embraced monsters. Good monsters, like good art, replace conventional ideas with something weird, troubling, and potentially
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Why Diane Arbus, John Carpenter, and David Lynch embraced monsters. Good monsters, like good art, replace conventional ideas with something weird, troubling, and potentially heroic

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Should public art be affirmative? A sensation at 25 and a MacArthur &ldquo;genius&rdquo; grantee, <strong>Kara Walker</strong> makes provocative, monumental works that challenge the idea

Should public art be affirmative? A sensation at 25 and a MacArthur &amp;ldquo;genius&amp;rdquo; grantee, Kara Walker makes provocative, monumental works that challenge the
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Should public art be affirmative? A sensation at 25 and a MacArthur “genius” grantee, Kara Walker makes provocative, monumental works that challenge the idea

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

De Anima

2017.04.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Aristotle, De Anima, Christopher Shields (tr., intro., comm.), Oxford University Press, 2016, 415pp., $32.00 (pbk), ISBN
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2017.04.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Aristotle, De Anima, Christopher Shields (tr., intro., comm.), Oxford University Press, 2016, 415pp., $32.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780199243457. Reviewed by Hendrik Lorenz, Princeton University "The Clarendon Aristotle series," Christopher Shields writes, "takes as its mission a plain, forthright exposition of Aristotle's philosophy for the engaged Greekless reader rather than the professional philologist" (xlvi f.). In keeping with this mission, the present work offers a substantive introduction, a new translation, a commentary, and a glossary. The work's introduction begins by briefly describing the topics that Aristotle tackles in his treatise on the soul. Aristotle conceives of the soul (psukhē) as principle of life, as what by its presence is responsible for the various kinds of vital activities that the different kinds of living things engage in. So, Aristotle's topics in the De Anima (DA) include the nature. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Epictetus

[Revised entry by Margaret Graver on April 17, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A Greek philosopher of 1st and early 2nd centuries C.E., and an exponent of Stoic ethics notable for the
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[Revised entry by Margaret Graver on April 17, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A Greek philosopher of 1st and early 2nd centuries C.E., and an exponent of Stoic ethics notable for the consistency and power of his ethical thought and for effective methods of teaching. Epictetus's chief concerns are with integrity, self-management, and personal freedom, which he advocates by demanding of his students a thorough examination of two central ideas, the capacity he terms 'volition' (prohairesis) and the...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

In 1961, a B-list Hollywood figure sought out <strong>J.D. Salinger</strong> to secure film rights to <em>Catcher in the Rye.</em> Their encounter reads like a "one-act play bound for the theater of the absurd"

In 1961, a B-list Hollywood figure sought out J.D. Salinger to secure film rights to Catcher in the Rye. Their encounter reads like a &quot;one-act play bound for the theater of the
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In 1961, a B-list Hollywood figure sought out J.D. Salinger to secure film rights to Catcher in the Rye. Their encounter reads like a "one-act play bound for the theater of the absurd"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>When Empson went East</strong>. The literary critic, booted from Cambridge after condoms were discovered in his room, left for Japan and China. It was a professional calamity that proved fortunate&nbsp;

When Empson went East. The literary critic, booted from Cambridge after condoms were discovered in his room, left for Japan and China. It was a professional calamity that proved
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When Empson went East. The literary critic, booted from Cambridge after condoms were discovered in his room, left for Japan and China. It was a professional calamity that proved fortunate 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily