Once upon a time, a bar-brawling but talented malcontent could make a career as a professor. Consider the improbable 30-year employment of <strong>Harry Crews</strong>

Once upon a time, a bar-brawling but talented malcontent could make a career as a professor. Consider the improbable 30-year employment of Harry
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Once upon a time, a bar-brawling but talented malcontent could make a career as a professor. Consider the improbable 30-year employment of Harry Crews

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Merriam-Webster's offices</strong> aren't velvet-curtained or oak-trimmed. They're less refined: drug deals in the parking lot, bullet holes in the safety glass&nbsp;

Merriam-Webster&#39;s offices aren&#39;t velvet-curtained or oak-trimmed. They&#39;re less refined: drug deals in the parking lot, bullet holes in the safety
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Merriam-Webster's offices aren't velvet-curtained or oak-trimmed. They're less refined: drug deals in the parking lot, bullet holes in the safety glass 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The sculptor <strong>Camille Claudel</strong> spent 30 years in an asylum. Some blame her breakdown on a failed relationship with Rodin &mdash; but it was she who broke his heart

The sculptor Camille Claudel spent 30 years in an asylum. Some blame her breakdown on a failed relationship with Rodin &amp;mdash; but it was she who broke his
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The sculptor Camille Claudel spent 30 years in an asylum. Some blame her breakdown on a failed relationship with Rodin — but it was she who broke his heart

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Virtue Ethics of Hume and Nietzsche

2017.04.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christine Swanton, The Virtue Ethics of Hume and Nietzsche, Wiley Blackwell, 2015, 277pp., $99.95 (hbk), ISBN 9781118939390.
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2017.04.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christine Swanton, The Virtue Ethics of Hume and Nietzsche, Wiley Blackwell, 2015, 277pp., $99.95 (hbk), ISBN 9781118939390. Reviewed by Craig Beam, Wilfrid Laurier University This book, part of the New Directions in Ethics series, argues that Hume and Nietzsche should be interpreted as virtue ethicists, that they have much in common, and that they provide useful supplements to classical aretaic theories. In the first two chapters, Christine Swanton argues that virtue ethics should be seen as a group of moral theories with different origins, rather than having a single progenitor in Aristotle (20). Hume and Nietzsche alike seek to rescue conceptions of the good life from an underpinning in religious morality and associated doctrines (6). Both are naturalists, and after discussing several senses of naturalism, Swanton defines them as "spare naturalists" (9). She argues that Hume should be read as a "response. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Dictatorships & Moral Defects

Embed from Getty Images Dictatorships are built upon the moral defects of citizens. While it can be tempting to think that the citizens who enable dictatorships are morally evil, this need not be
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Embed from Getty Images Dictatorships are built upon the moral defects of citizens. While it can be tempting to think that the citizens who enable dictatorships are morally evil, this need not be the case. Dictatorship does not require an actively evil population, merely a sufficient number who are morally defective in ways that makes them suitably vulnerable to the appeals of dictatorship. While there are many paths to dictatorship, most would-be dictators make appeals to fear, hatred, willful ignorance, and irresponsibility. For these appeals to succeed, an adequate number of citizens must be morally lacking in ways that make them vulnerable to such appeals. As would be expected, the best defense against dictators is moral virtue—which is why would-be dictators endeavor to destroy such virtue. I will briefly discuss each of these appeals in turn and will do so in the context of an ethics of virtue. For the typical virtue theorist, virtue is a mean between two extremes. For. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Medieval Theories of Modality

[Revised entry by Simo Knuuttila on April 19, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] There are four modal paradigms in ancient philosophy: the frequency interpretation of modality, the model
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[Revised entry by Simo Knuuttila on April 19, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] There are four modal paradigms in ancient philosophy: the frequency interpretation of modality, the model of possibility as a potency, the model of antecedent necessities and possibilities with respect to a certain moment of time (diachronic modalities), and the model of possibility as non-contradictoriness. None of these conceptions, which were well known to early medieval thinkers through the works of Boethius, was based on the idea of modality as involving reference to simultaneous alternatives. This new paradigm was introduced into...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Transhumanists</strong> tend to see religion as a threat. But the movement's appeal is fundamentally religious, a secular outgrowth of Christian eschatology

Transhumanists tend to see religion as a threat. But the movement&#39;s appeal is fundamentally religious, a secular outgrowth of Christian
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Transhumanists tend to see religion as a threat. But the movement's appeal is fundamentally religious, a secular outgrowth of Christian eschatology

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Behold the Thought Leader</strong>, a thinker so deft and deluded he can flatter great wealth even as he pretends to challenge it

Behold the Thought Leader, a thinker so deft and deluded he can flatter great wealth even as he pretends to challenge
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Behold the Thought Leader, a thinker so deft and deluded he can flatter great wealth even as he pretends to challenge it

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The legend of <strong>Zelda Fitzgerald</strong>. She was ahead of her time, a proto-feminist, a victim of the patriarchy and of her husband. Or something like that

The legend of Zelda Fitzgerald. She was ahead of her time, a proto-feminist, a victim of the patriarchy and of her husband. Or something like
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The legend of Zelda Fitzgerald. She was ahead of her time, a proto-feminist, a victim of the patriarchy and of her husband. Or something like that

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Objects: Nothing out of the Ordinary

2017.04.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Daniel Z. Korman, Objects: Nothing out of the Ordinary, Oxford University Press, 2016, 251pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.04.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Daniel Z. Korman, Objects: Nothing out of the Ordinary, Oxford University Press, 2016, 251pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198732532. Reviewed by Simon J. Evnine, University of Miami Daniel Z. Korman defends conservatism about ordinary objects. He understands ordinary objects to include artifacts, biological organisms, and things like electrons, rocks, rivers, and planets. Conservatism contrasts with two other positions, eliminativism and permissivism. According to eliminativism, there are no ordinary objects; according to permissivism, there are ordinary objects and a whole lot of extraordinary ones too. Extraordinary objects are not things like undiscovered organisms or fundamental particles but rather monsters of philosophy -- arbitrary mereological sums and so on. (For the most part, Korman confines his attention to concrete particulars so the question of whether things like properties, propositions, and. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News