Pride Month: 1800 to the present [timeline]

OUP Philosophy is celebrating Pride Month to mark the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality, and to coincide with NYC Pride and London Pride in June and July. The post Pride
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OUP Philosophy is celebrating Pride Month to mark the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality, and to coincide with NYC Pride and London Pride in June and July. Throughout history those in the LGBTQ community have faced discrimination and injustice for their sexuality, and have struggled to fight for equal rights. In this timeline, we have created an overview of how attitudes and behaviors have changed over time, and highlighted important milestones in the UK and US along the way. Featured image: Rainbow Flag in the Twin Cities. Photo by Tony Webster. CC-BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons. The post Pride Month: 1800 to the present [timeline] appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesAbstract objects: two ways of introducing them, in the core and the periphery of languageListening for change9 facts about hermeneutics 

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Abstract objects: two ways of introducing them, in the core and the periphery of language

One of the most striking features of natural language is that it comes with a wealth of terms for abstract objects, or so it seems, and to a great extent they can be formed quite systematically and
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One of the most striking features of natural language is that it comes with a wealth of terms for abstract objects, or so it seems, and to a great extent they can be formed quite systematically and productively. First, we can form nominalizations from expressions that normally serve as predicates, for example adjectives, and the nominalizations can be used, it seems to refer to abstract objects. Thus, from the adjective wise, we get wisdom or Socrates’ wisdom, and from the adjective patient, we get the noun patience. Wisdom and patience seem to be used as abstract terms below: (1) a. Wisdom is admirable. b. Patience is better than impatience. Even nouns for concrete objects (diamond, ant) can be used without a determiner as abstract terms, referring to the kind whose instances are things described by the noun: (2) a. Pink diamonds are rare. b. Ants are widespread. There are also complex construction that seem to stand for abstract objects, for example the number of planets or the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Fraud, lies, and the importance of the group. Via attachment theory, Arendt, and Milgram, a former cult member considers <strong>the psychology of brainwashing</strong>

Fraud, lies, and the importance of the group. Via attachment theory, Arendt, and Milgram, a former cult member considers the psychology of
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Fraud, lies, and the importance of the group. Via attachment theory, Arendt, and Milgram, a former cult member considers the psychology of brainwashing

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Even Bach, musical savant and master of counterpoint, did not escape critique. For one journalist, his work contained <strong>&ldquo;too much art&rdquo;</strong>

Even Bach, musical savant and master of counterpoint, did not escape critique. For one journalist, his work contained &amp;ldquo;too much
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Even Bach, musical savant and master of counterpoint, did not escape critique. For one journalist, his work contained “too much art”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>A passion for the mundane.</strong> A scuffed old bread knife, a glass vase, a coffee table &mdash; ordinary objects delighted, inspired, and confounded Matisse

A passion for the mundane. A scuffed old bread knife, a glass vase, a coffee table &amp;mdash; ordinary objects delighted, inspired, and confounded
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A passion for the mundane. A scuffed old bread knife, a glass vase, a coffee table — ordinary objects delighted, inspired, and confounded Matisse

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Virtual Cheating II: Sexting & Virtual Worlds

Embed from Getty Images While there is considerable debate about the right moral theory to apply to the ethics of cheating in a relationship, it is generally agreed that what makes cheating is that
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Embed from Getty Images While there is considerable debate about the right moral theory to apply to the ethics of cheating in a relationship, it is generally agreed that what makes cheating is that a person in a committed relationship is engaging in sexual activity with a person outside of that relationship. As such, cheating involves three main factors. The first is that the cheater is in a relationship that is supposed to exclude cheating. The second is that there is sexual activity. The third is that this activity is with a person outside of the relationship. These factors would, on the face of it, exclude sexting and “cheating” in virtual environments (such as video games) from the realm of cheating. Or, more precisely, the sexual activity factor would exclude these activities. After all, sexting is just the exchange of texts and in current virtual environments, there is no sexual contact. For example, if two players in World of Warcraft decide they are going to have a “virtual. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Constructivism in Metaethics

[Revised entry by Carla Bagnoli on June 23, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Metaethical constructivism is the view that insofar as there are normative truths, they are not fixed by
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[Revised entry by Carla Bagnoli on June 23, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Metaethical constructivism is the view that insofar as there are normative truths, they are not fixed by normative facts that are independent of what rational agents would agree to under some specified conditions of choice. The appeal of this view lies in the promise to explain how normative truths are objective and independent of our actual judgments, while also binding and authoritative for us....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

9 facts about hermeneutics

Hermeneutics is the art of understanding and of making oneself understood. But what does &#39;hermeneutics&#39; mean? Where did the term originate and how is it used in day-to-day life? Jens Zimmermann,
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What does hermeneutics mean? Where did the term originate and how is it used in day-to-day life? Jens Zimmermann, author of Hermeneutics: A Very Short Introduction, tell us 9 things everyone should know about hermeneutics. Hermeneutics is all about interpretation in fields of study, such as interpreting plays or novels, but also in day-to-day life, when we interpret actions of our friends or try to figure out what a job termination, for example, means in the context of our life story. Hermeneutics is the art of understanding and of making oneself understood. It goes beyond mere logical analysis and general interpretive principles. The word ‘hermeneutics’ comes from the ancient Greek language. Hermeneuein means ‘to utter, to explain, to translate’ and was first used by thinkers who discussed how divine messages or mental ideas are expressed in human language. Hermeneutics is also the name for the philosophical discipline concerned with analysing the conditions for understanding.. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Does Anything Really Matter?: Essays on Parfit on Objectivity

2017.06.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Peter Singer (ed.), Does Anything Really Matter?: Essays on Parfit on Objectivity, Oxford University Press, 2017, 300pp., $45.00
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2017.06.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Peter Singer (ed.), Does Anything Really Matter?: Essays on Parfit on Objectivity, Oxford University Press, 2017, 300pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199653836. Reviewed by Andrew Sepielli, University of Toronto This is a volume of essays on meta-ethical themes from Derek Parfit's magisterial book On What Matters. It boasts an impressive list of contributors, most of whom, we learn from Peter Singer's introduction, were chosen because Parfit saw fit to criticize their views at length. Predictably, then, most of them are established "big names", and many of their essays are defensive in character. As a result, the volume is a bit too intellectually conservative to meet the editor's stated goal of "reinvigorat[ing] discussions of objectivism in ethics". Nonetheless, it helps to clarify these discussions, and to bring out the deeper concerns that animated Parfit's bold and at times controversial stances in. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>Orchestras of the Third Reich</strong>. Austro-German musicians&rsquo; admiration for Hitler strains any belief that high art is ennobling to the spirit

Orchestras of the Third Reich. Austro-German musicians&amp;rsquo; admiration for Hitler strains any belief that high art is ennobling to the
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Orchestras of the Third Reich. Austro-German musicians’ admiration for Hitler strains any belief that high art is ennobling to the spirit

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily