Intentionality and Theodicy

The following line of thought is commonly found in analytic philosophy of mind: the reason calcluators, for instance, are not minds is that the symbols they manipulate in order to solve mathematical
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The following line of thought is commonly found in analytic philosophy of mind: the reason calcluators, for instance, are not minds is that the symbols they manipulate in order to solve mathematical problems to not mean anything to them (the calculators). It is not that their symbols/representations lack meaning or reference. Rather, they have the [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

"The <strong>infatuation with portents</strong>&nbsp;&mdash; with the supposed relevance of voices from the past &mdash; is neither bread nor circus. It&rsquo;s an obsession with history that can also be a form of amnesia"

&quot;The infatuation with portents&amp;nbsp;&amp;mdash; with the supposed relevance of voices from the past &amp;mdash; is neither bread nor circus. It&amp;rsquo;s an obsession with history that can also be a form of
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"The infatuation with portents — with the supposed relevance of voices from the past — is neither bread nor circus. It’s an obsession with history that can also be a form of amnesia"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Giorgio Vasari</strong>&nbsp;was a second-rate artist and a first-rate gossip. Behold his catalog of piquant trivia about Renaissance Italy&nbsp;

Giorgio Vasari&amp;nbsp;was a second-rate artist and a first-rate gossip. Behold his catalog of piquant trivia about Renaissance
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Giorgio Vasari was a second-rate artist and a first-rate gossip. Behold his catalog of piquant trivia about Renaissance Italy 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Evelyn Waugh and Graham Greene are more readable than <strong>Henry Green</strong>. But Green is more rereadable &mdash; his opaque works reward our repeated attention

Evelyn Waugh and Graham Greene are more readable than Henry Green. But Green is more rereadable &amp;mdash; his opaque works reward our repeated
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Evelyn Waugh and Graham Greene are more readable than Henry Green. But Green is more rereadable — his opaque works reward our repeated attention

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Moritz Schlick

[Revised entry by Thomas Oberdan on October 13, 2017. Changes to: Main text] Although Moritz Schlick (1882 - 1936) made a lasting mark in the philosophical memory by his role as the nominal leader
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[Revised entry by Thomas Oberdan on October 13, 2017. Changes to: Main text] Although Moritz Schlick (1882 - 1936) made a lasting mark in the philosophical memory by his role as the nominal leader of the Vienna Circle of Logical Positivists, his most lasting contribution includes a broad range of philosophical achievements. Indeed, Schlick's reputation was established well before the Circle went public. In 1917, he published Space and Time in Contemporary Physics, a philosophical introduction to the new physics of Relativity which was...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The nonstop crescendo of Allan Bloom's assault on the modern university made it easy for liberals to dismiss him &mdash; too easy. <strong>Todd Gitlin</strong> explains

The nonstop crescendo of Allan Bloom&#39;s assault on the modern university made it easy for liberals to dismiss him &amp;mdash; too easy. Todd Gitlin
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The nonstop crescendo of Allan Bloom's assault on the modern university made it easy for liberals to dismiss him — too easy. Todd Gitlin explains

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Arthur Schlesinger Jr.</strong> was not just a historian but an "action-intellectual," driven by his commitments and a belief that politics is more a war of will than of ideas

Arthur Schlesinger Jr. was not just a historian but an &quot;action-intellectual,&quot; driven by his commitments and a belief that politics is more a war of will than of
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Arthur Schlesinger Jr. was not just a historian but an "action-intellectual," driven by his commitments and a belief that politics is more a war of will than of ideas

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

When <strong>music wielded imperial might</strong>. The Chinese Music Bureau, founded around 120 BC, was led by someone whose primary career experience was training hunting dogs

When music wielded imperial might. The Chinese Music Bureau, founded around 120 BC, was led by someone whose primary career experience was training hunting
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When music wielded imperial might. The Chinese Music Bureau, founded around 120 BC, was led by someone whose primary career experience was training hunting dogs

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Art, Mind, and Narrative: Themes from the Work of Peter Goldie

2017.10.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Julian Dodd (ed.), Art, Mind, and Narrative: Themes from the Work of Peter Goldie, Oxford University Press, 2016, 271pp., $74.00
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2017.10.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Julian Dodd (ed.), Art, Mind, and Narrative: Themes from the Work of Peter Goldie, Oxford University Press, 2016, 271pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198769736. Reviewed by Cain Todd, Lancaster University It can be a challenge to provide a general sense of the contents of philosophical anthologies -- and hence to avoid a mere summary -- unless they are particularly constrained and unified by their theme. Even then, it is impossible to do anything like equal justice to all of the contributions. In the case of this volume, the collected papers are unified to the extent that they all focus on Peter Goldie's main philosophical concerns. Although these concerns were extremely wide ranging, they were more or less connected by the themes of narrative, art, and emotion, and by Goldie's distinctive recognition of the complexity and relative disorder of our mental lives. Few other philosophers have managed so. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Underdetermination of Scientific Theory

[Revised entry by Kyle Stanford on October 12, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] At the heart of the underdetermination of scientific theory by evidence is the simple idea
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[Revised entry by Kyle Stanford on October 12, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] At the heart of the underdetermination of scientific theory by evidence is the simple idea that the evidence available to us at a given time may be insufficient to determine what beliefs we should hold in response to it. In a textbook example, if all I know is that you spent $10 on apples and oranges and that apples cost $1 while oranges cost $2, then I know that you did not buy six oranges, but I do not know whether you bought one orange and eight apples, two oranges and six apples, and so on. A simple scientific example can be...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy