Analogia Entis: Metaphysics: Original Structure and Universal Rhythm

2014.08.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Erich Przywara, Analogia Entis: Metaphysics: Original Structure and Universal Rhythm, John R. Betz and David Bentley Hart (trs.),
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2014.08.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Erich Przywara, Analogia Entis: Metaphysics: Original Structure and Universal Rhythm, John R. Betz and David Bentley Hart (trs.), Eerdmans, 2014, 628pp., $60.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780802868596. Reviewed by Christopher J. Malloy, University of Dallas The publication of Erich Przywara's Analogia Entis (1889-1972) is a major, welcome event, especially in the English speaking theological world. Przywara's work, which engaged theological and philosophical traditions from Plato to Heidegger, from Dionysius and Augustine to Aquinas, influenced Hans Urs von Balthasar and Karl Rahner; it resonates with the thought of Radical Orthodoxy and that of Jean-Luc Marion. Despite these influences and resonances, few English-speaking readers have studied Przywara. This edition leaves little more to be desired. It includes not only the classic monograph Analogia Entis (1932), but also over 300 pages of Przywara's later relevant. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

A Visit with Mary Beard

Despite the invective, Mary Beard does not feel bad about her neck or hair or teeth. “I’m a classicist, not an autocue girl.”…
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Despite the invective, Mary Beard does not feel bad about her neck or hair or teeth. “I’m a classicist, not an autocue girl.”… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Metaphor

Metaphor is more than language; it’s a way of thought. Why say that something is something else? Because sometimes ordinary words won’t do…
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Metaphor is more than language; it’s a way of thought. Why say that something is something else? Because sometimes ordinary words won’t do… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What We See When We Read

What color, exactly, is Anna Karenina’s hair? How tall is Melville’s Ishmael? We “see” literature in our minds, but what does it mean?…
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What color, exactly, is Anna Karenina’s hair? How tall is Melville’s Ishmael? We “see” literature in our minds, but what does it mean?… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Civil Disagreement: Personal Integrity in a Pluralistic Society

2014.08.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Edward Langerak, Civil Disagreement: Personal Integrity in a Pluralistic Society, Georgetown University Press, 2014, 170pp.,
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2014.08.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Edward Langerak, Civil Disagreement: Personal Integrity in a Pluralistic Society, Georgetown University Press, 2014, 170pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781626160330. Reviewed by Mark Kingwell, University of Toronto Laments about the decline of civility are the currency of the age. Look at the social-media meltdowns, the incendiary political talk shows, or the insult-swapping norms of comments boards. Observe the growing intransigence of partisan bickering at the highest levels of government, where elected representatives go on record as intending to strangle across-the-floor efforts in the name of ideological purity. Consider the creeping isolation of districts and neighbourhoods -- not to mention publications, workplaces, eating venues, and shopping sites -- which enbubble citizens among the like-minded so that they need never encounter a disagreeing citizen (or, in some cases, an impoverished one) except in. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Pacifism

[Revised entry by Andrew Fiala on August 14, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Pacifism is a commitment to peace and opposition to war. Our ordinary language allows a diverse set of
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[Revised entry by Andrew Fiala on August 14, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Pacifism is a commitment to peace and opposition to war. Our ordinary language allows a diverse set of beliefs and commitments to be held together under the general rubric of pacifism. This article will explain the family resemblance among the variety of pacifisms. It will...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Question about Science - Charles Taliaferro responds

Woods cut from trees have certain physical properties that a reductionist might claim are expressions of atomic or sub-atomic phenomena (mostly empty space, though we experience wood as hard). Since
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Woods cut from trees have certain physical properties that a reductionist might claim are expressions of atomic or sub-atomic phenomena (mostly empty space, though we experience wood as hard). Since the tree is alive can reductionism account for the role of organic life in organizing or directing (e.g., cell division) those physical properties? I think that a physicist cannot fully explain the macroscopic properties of wood (e.g., hard) by material reduction without recourse to life sciences that are beyond his/her realm of study. What I am proposing is that reductionism fails via category error when applied to life or consciousness. Response from: Charles Taliaferro I think you raise a great point. This is an area that is much debated, so my response should not be considered the official philosophical position. I think the direction of your thinking is sound. If we are to limit ourselves to the world as described and explained in an ideal physics, there is quite a lot of. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Shared Agency: A Planning Theory of Acting Together

2014.08.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael E. Bratman, Shared Agency: A Planning Theory of Acting Together, Oxford University Press, 2014, 219pp., $29.95 (pbk),
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2014.08.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael E. Bratman, Shared Agency: A Planning Theory of Acting Together, Oxford University Press, 2014, 219pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780199339990. Reviewed by Raimo Tuomela, University of Helsinki/University of Munich In this book Michael Bratman presents a unified and systematic theory, termed "planning theory", of shared agency. It is concisely written and presents the fullest version of his planning theory to date. This book is a welcome contribution to the literature on philosophical action theory and on collective intentionality phenomena by one of the leading theorists in the field. The chapters bear the following titles: 1. Sociality and Planning Agency, 2. Building Blocks, Part 1, 3. Building Blocks, Part 2, 4. A Construction of Modest Sociality, 5. Modest Sociality and Mutual Obligation, 6. Group Agents Without Group Subjects, 7. Shared Deliberation, Common Ground, Conclusion: Interconnected. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Should You Take a Smile at Face Value?

Exposed teeth, bunched cheeks, crinkled eyes: A smile is a peculiar thing, not least because of the spooky similarity between laughter and crying…
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Exposed teeth, bunched cheeks, crinkled eyes: A smile is a peculiar thing, not least because of the spooky similarity between laughter and crying… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Bertolt Brecht

Stricken with a litany of ailments, Bertolt Brecht was perseverance personified. “If the 20th century had had an Enlightenment, he would have been it”…
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Stricken with a litany of ailments, Bertolt Brecht was perseverance personified. “If the 20th century had had an Enlightenment, he would have been it”… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily