The Romantic Absolute: Being and Knowing in Early German Romantic Philosophy, 1795-1804

2014.06.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dalia Nassar, The Romantic Absolute: Being and Knowing in Early German Romantic Philosophy, 1795-1804, University of Chicago
Philosophy News image
2014.06.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dalia Nassar, The Romantic Absolute: Being and Knowing in Early German Romantic Philosophy, 1795-1804, University of Chicago Press, 2014, 341pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226084060. Reviewed by Judith Norman, Trinity University Dalia Nassar's book is a welcome addition to the growing body of scholarly literature on the philosophy of German Romanticism. It is structured around three thinkers central to the movement, Novalis (Friedrich Leopold von Hardenberg), Friedrich von Schlegel, and Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling. By examining some of the ideas these thinkers were exploring from about 1795 to 1802, Nassar constructs a distinctively philosophical position for romanticism during the fertile period of theory production between Kant and Hegel. The overarching theme of the book is the notion of the absolute: the role the absolute plays in each of these three men's system conceptions, and the. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

On Gordon Lish

At 80, Gordon Lish hides from the sun, guards his legacy, and corrects the record. For instance, he wants you to know that he slept with only one student…
Philosophy News image
At 80, Gordon Lish hides from the sun, guards his legacy, and corrects the record. For instance, he wants you to know that he slept with only one student… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Love, factionally

People ask Carl Wilson: Isn’t life too short to waste time thinking about artists you dislike, such as Celine Dion? The way he sees it, life is too short not to…
Philosophy News image
People ask Carl Wilson: Isn’t life too short to waste time thinking about artists you dislike, such as Celine Dion? The way he sees it, life is too short not to… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Feminism and its discontents

A rape crisis at colleges? Harvey Mansfield is dubious. But he knows what to blame: feminism – for insisting on a culture of sexual adventure that never results in misadventure…
Philosophy News image
A rape crisis at colleges? Harvey Mansfield is dubious. But he knows what to blame: feminism – for insisting on a culture of sexual adventure that never results in misadventure… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Role Ethics of Epictetus: Stoicism in Ordinary Life

2014.06.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Brian E. Johnson, The Role Ethics of Epictetus: Stoicism in Ordinary Life, Lexington Books, 2014, 200pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN
Philosophy News image
2014.06.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Brian E. Johnson, The Role Ethics of Epictetus: Stoicism in Ordinary Life, Lexington Books, 2014, 200pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780739179673. Reviewed by Margaret Graver, Dartmouth College This work, a revision of the author's 2007 dissertation, is an in-depth study of the distinctive and in some ways original ethical system developed by Epictetus in the early decades of the second century C.E. In contrast to the accounts of Stoic ethics given in Cicero and Seneca and in the doxographical tradition, Epictetus shows little interest in defining the cardinal virtues or in the theoretical absolutes expressed in the so-called "paradoxes," e.g., that all fools are insane or that only the sage is free. He concentrates rather on the particular nature of each person and on a small group of injunctions concerned with the individual's integrity of volition, attitude toward externals, and relations with others. The. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Diametric Mind, Philosophy TV, and More

For those of you who haven’t seen it, I wanted to direct your attention to the discussion of recent work by Tony Jack and colleagues on “the diametric mind” at Psychology Today, including the
Philosophy News image
For those of you who haven’t seen it, I wanted to direct your attention to the discussion of recent work by Tony Jack and colleagues on “the diametric mind” at Psychology Today, including the chapter “More than a feeling: Counterintuitive effects of compassion on moral judgment” in the recently released volume Advances in Experimental Philosophy of Mind. This is one of three volumes in a new series from Bloomsbury under series editor James Beebe. The other two volumes are Advances in Experimental Epistemology edited by Beebe and Advances in Experimental Moral Psychology edited by Sarkissian and Wright. Both are excellent and well worth checking out!  Also worth checking out is the new episode of Philosophy TV with Marti and Machery discussing experimental philosophy of reference. This is part of a series of debates involving contributors to another fantastic new volume on x-phi, Current Controversies in Experimental Philosophy edited by Machery and O’Neill.

Continue reading . . .

News source: Experimental Philosophy

A World Without Why

2014.06.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Raymond Geuss, A World Without Why, Princeton University Press, 2014, 264pp., $39.50 (hbk), ISBN 9780691155883. Reviewed by
Philosophy News image
2014.06.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Raymond Geuss, A World Without Why, Princeton University Press, 2014, 264pp., $39.50 (hbk), ISBN 9780691155883. Reviewed by Matt Sleat, University of Sheffield There is an interview available on the internet in which Raymond Geuss walks through a graveyard, gesticulating animatedly but gently, and reflecting upon the vocation of philosophy.[1] Philosophy, we are told, is nothing other than Geuss' means for survival in an otherwise horrible world, employing the talents that he was lucky enough to be endowed with to live a slightly more comfortable life than he might otherwise have had. While philosophy is not a calling, he comforts us that it is nevertheless 'of some use' to a few students each year and, thankfully, 'not reprehensible'. And in the title chapter of his new book, Geuss describes teaching philosophy as 'a mildly discreditable day job' largely directed towards churning out the... . . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Football and the classical past

What can we learn from the odes of Pindar and Pelé? Sport isn’t about the athleticism of youth, it’s about mortality…
Philosophy News image
What can we learn from the odes of Pindar and Pelé? Sport isn’t about the athleticism of youth, it’s about mortality… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

God is dead, long live God

Reason, nature, culture, the sublime, science, humanity, being, society: The quest to find a secular alternative to God is long, arduous, and continuing…
Philosophy News image
Reason, nature, culture, the sublime, science, humanity, being, society: The quest to find a secular alternative to God is long, arduous, and continuing… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

When Literature Was Dangerous

The publication of Ulysses was a victory for linguistic freedom and sexual candor. Now anything goes, and not much matters. Literature lacks urgency…
Philosophy News image
The publication of Ulysses was a victory for linguistic freedom and sexual candor. Now anything goes, and not much matters. Literature lacks urgency… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily