Empty Ideas: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy

2014.12.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Peter Unger, Empty Ideas: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2014, 258pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2014.12.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Peter Unger, Empty Ideas: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2014, 258pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199330812. Reviewed by Katherine Hawley, University of St Andrews THIS IS NDPR'S LAST REVIEW FOR 2014. WE WILL RESUME PUBLICATION ON JANUARY 11, 2015 BEST... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Problem of Animal Pain: A Theodicy for All Creatures Great and Small

2014.12.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Trent Dougherty, The Problem of Animal Pain: A Theodicy for All Creatures Great and Small, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 197pp.,
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2014.12.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Trent Dougherty, The Problem of Animal Pain: A Theodicy for All Creatures Great and Small, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 197pp., $105.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780230368484. Reviewed by John Schneider, Calvin College/Grand Valley State University Trent Dougherty calls his book "a report from the frontier" (3-4), because so few fellow analytical philosophers have written on the problem of animal pain. The philosophical disputation over God and evil has indeed been focused mainly on human suffering, not so much on the suffering of animals. Michael Murray (Nature Red in Tooth and Claw, 2008) is the conspicuous exception, and Dougherty interacts extensively with parts of Murray's book. I suggest, however, that theologians Christopher Southgate (The Groaning of Creation, 2008) and Nicola Hoggard Creegan (Animal Suffering and the Problem of Evil, 2013) would have been worthy dialogue partners, too, at key points in the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Donkeys and the military

When did the humble donkey become the ultimate fighting machine? It all began in 520 BC with King Darius I…
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When did the humble donkey become the ultimate fighting machine? It all began in 520 BC with King Darius I… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Culinary imagination

For Robert Burns (haggis), Virginia Woolf (sausage, haddock), and Emily Dickinson (Black Cake), appetite was important to art…
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For Robert Burns (haggis), Virginia Woolf (sausage, haddock), and Emily Dickinson (Black Cake), appetite was important to art… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Joan Didion at 80

An American essay today without a sudden and revelatory personal aside is hardly an American essay at all. For that tic we can thank Joan Didion…
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An American essay today without a sudden and revelatory personal aside is hardly an American essay at all. For that tic we can thank Joan Didion… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Gilbert Simondon's Psychic and Collective Individuation: A Critical Introduction and Guide

2014.12.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Scott, Gilbert Simondon's Psychic and Collective Individuation: A Critical Introduction and Guide, Edinburgh University
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2014.12.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Scott, Gilbert Simondon's Psychic and Collective Individuation: A Critical Introduction and Guide, Edinburgh University Press, 2014, 218pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780748654499. Reviewed by Iwona Janicka, University of Cambridge Gilbert Simondon has fascinated an increasing number of Anglophone scholars, not only as an important influence on Gilles Deleuze, Bernard Stiegler or Speculative Realism, but also as a philosopher in his own right. Despite various efforts of Simondon enthusiasts online and offline, the translation of his works has proven to be a very slow process, and the English-speaking public is still waiting for a full translation of his Psychic and Collective Individuation (L'individuation psychique et collective). As a foretaste, however, Edinburgh University Press has published David Scott's book, which serves as an introduction and a guide, providing a chapter-by-chapter commentary on. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Afterlife

[Revised entry by William Hasker and Charles Taliaferro on December 18, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] One of the points where there is a significant, long-lasting intersection of the
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[Revised entry by William Hasker and Charles Taliaferro on December 18, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] One of the points where there is a significant, long-lasting intersection of the interests of many philosophers with the interests of many people of all kinds and conditions concerns the nature and significance of death. How should we understand the mortality of all living things and, closer to home, how should we understand our own mortality? Is it possible for persons to survive biological death? This is a topic that has occupied both analytic and continental philosophy in the twentieth century (e.g., Fred Feldman, Martin Heidegger). When the topic of death is ignored or denied in popular...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Knowledge De Se & Omnitemporality

An omniscient knower would know every true proposition–would have all possible propositional knowledge–but would also have knowledge de se. He would know, for instance, at each possible
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An omniscient knower would know every true proposition–would have all possible propositional knowledge–but would also have knowledge de se. He would know, for instance, at each possible world, which world he inhabits; he would know that he is in world W’ when in W’ and that he is in W when in W. But just [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

How We Fight: Ethics in War

2014.12.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Helen Frowe and Gerald Lang (eds.), How We Fight: Ethics in War, Oxford University Press, 2014, 196pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2014.12.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Helen Frowe and Gerald Lang (eds.), How We Fight: Ethics in War, Oxford University Press, 2014, 196pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199673438. Reviewed by Mark Jensen, United States Air Force Academy Classical Just War Theory is in crisis. The breakdown of the Westphalian international order, the muddling of the distinction between combatants and non-combatants, and the rise of ethnic, tribal, and religious conflict together undermine the central presuppositions of the tradition. However, international recognition of the principles of classical just war theory is a strong as ever. For example, many nations use force only in defense, and nearly all justify their use of force only in these terms. New weapons and tactics have been developed to minimize threats to non-combatants. Moreover, the approach of Western nations to ending conflict is to secure a path toward popular sovereignty, representative governance,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Ayn Rand in Las Vegas

Ayn Rand on the Strip. Both Las Vegas and Objectivism offer an escape from reality. How fitting that acolytes of the turgid novelist descended on the city…
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Ayn Rand on the Strip. Both Las Vegas and Objectivism offer an escape from reality. How fitting that acolytes of the turgid novelist descended on the city… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily