Object as Subject

Driver’s License, Drone, Remote Control, Blanket, Phone Booth: Academic studies of everyday things aren’t new. And the new ones aren’t good…
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Driver’s License, Drone, Remote Control, Blanket, Phone Booth: Academic studies of everyday things aren’t new. And the new ones aren’t good… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Who is Responsible for a Living Wage?

View image | gettyimages.com There is, obviously enough, a minimum amount of income that a person or family needs in order to survive—that is, to pay for necessities such as food, shelter,
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View image | gettyimages.com There is, obviously enough, a minimum amount of income that a person or family needs in order to survive—that is, to pay for necessities such as food, shelter, clothing and health care. In order to address this need, the United States created a minimum wage. However, this wage has not kept up with the cost of living and many Americans simply do not earn enough to support themselves. These people are known, appropriately enough, as the working poor. This situation raises an obvious moral and practical question: who should bear the cost of making up the difference between the minimum wage and a living wage? The two main options seem to be the employers or the taxpayers. That is, either employers can pay employees enough to live on or the taxpayers will need to pick up the tab. Another alternative is to simply not make up the difference and allow people to try to survive in truly desperate poverty. In regards to who currently makes up the difference, at. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

The Bad Conscience

2015.04.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Vladimir Jankélévitch, The Bad Conscience, Andrew Kelley (tr.), University of Chicago Press, 179pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2015.04.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Vladimir Jankélévitch, The Bad Conscience, Andrew Kelley (tr.), University of Chicago Press, 179pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226009537. Reviewed by Nicolas de Warren, Husserl Archives, KU Leuven An unsuspecting reader could be easily forgiven for initial misgivings with Andrew Kelley's decision to include in his English translation of Vladimir Jankélévitch's The Bad Conscience every addition and deletion introduced in two subsequent re-editions (in 1951 and 1966) since its first publication in 1933. At first glance, this decision seems to visually encumber a text that demands undivided attention. As with other works, Jankélévitch continually emended his re-editions, and although his retouches are largely unassuming, each edition offers in fact another image of a book that subtly remained in motion. Kelley's conscientious decision to collate and include variations across the three editions has the virtue of. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Teaching ‘Western Values’ in China

Teaching political theory in Beijing. Human rights and democracy are fine, but no Marxism. And beware the censors…
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Teaching political theory in Beijing. Human rights and democracy are fine, but no Marxism. And beware the censors… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Liberal Arts vs. Neoliberalism

Words that used to mean something – ideals, character, self, soul – now mean nothing. The very idea of an inner life is passé at institutions of higher learning…
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Words that used to mean something – ideals, character, self, soul – now mean nothing. The very idea of an inner life is passé at institutions of higher learning… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Misunderstanding War

Blinkered and dangerous. Westerners tend to write about war as if success and failure depends only on themselves, not enemies or locals…
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Blinkered and dangerous. Westerners tend to write about war as if success and failure depends only on themselves, not enemies or locals… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Modal Quandaries

Here’s a modal quandary. Both modal arguments seem correct. Both arguments seem valid. (I) 1. Necessarily, God actualizes the best world. 2. There is no best possible world. 3. :. God does not
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Here’s a modal quandary. Both modal arguments seem correct. Both arguments seem valid. (I) 1. Necessarily, God actualizes the best world. 2. There is no best possible world. 3. :. God does not exist. (II) 1. There is no best possible world. 2. It is impossible that God actualizes the best possible world. 3. :. [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Computer Simulations in Science

[Revised entry by Eric Winsberg on April 23, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Computer simulation was pioneered as a scientific tool in meteorology and nuclear physics in the period
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[Revised entry by Eric Winsberg on April 23, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Computer simulation was pioneered as a scientific tool in meteorology and nuclear physics in the period directly following World War II, and since then has become indispensable in a growing number of disciplines. The list of sciences that make extensive use of computer simulation has grown to include astrophysics, particle physics, materials science, engineering, fluid mechanics, climate science, evolutionary biology, ecology, economics, decision theory, medicine,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Social Inquiry after Wittgenstein and Kuhn: Leaving Everything as It Is

2015.04.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John G. Gunnell, Social Inquiry after Wittgenstein and Kuhn: Leaving Everything as It Is, Columbia University Press, 2014,
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2015.04.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John G. Gunnell, Social Inquiry after Wittgenstein and Kuhn: Leaving Everything as It Is, Columbia University Press, 2014, 256pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780231169400. Reviewed by Vasso Kindi, University of Athens As the title suggests, the book aims to show that Wittgenstein's philosophy and Kuhn's work are significant for social inquiry. Even though the author is well aware of Wittgenstein's anti-theoretical stance and the non-empirical character of his philosophy, he maintains, on the one hand, that both Kuhn's and Wittgenstein's works are themselves exercises in social inquiry (they are on the same side with the social sciences in contrast to the side of the natural sciences), bringing about important innovations, and, on the other, that they provide theoretical accounts of social practices such as linguistic and scientific practices, enriching our understanding of the conventional phenomena that. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Newton and Empiricism

2015.04.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Zvi Biener and Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism, Oxford University Press, 2014, 366pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2015.04.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Zvi Biener and Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism, Oxford University Press, 2014, 366pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199337095. Reviewed by Katherine Brading, University of Notre Dame This edited collection has its origins in the 2010 Pittsburgh Center for Philosophy of Science conference of the same title. It contains ten essays plus an introduction, and is divided into three sections, focusing on Newton's experimental method, his relationship to Locke and Hume, and the deployment and development of "Newtonian method" in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. The volume provides new ways of thinking about Newton's contributions to philosophy for those familiar with early modern philosophy but not with Newton, and enriches and develops our understanding of Newton for those already familiar with some of Newton's own contributions to philosophy. It is a thoroughly enjoyable and rewarding read (and, I. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News