Amy Cuddy's TED talk on <strong>power poses</strong> &mdash; feet apart, hands on hips, head thrown back -- has been viewed 37 million times. How did such a flimsy idea become a sensation?

Amy Cuddy&#39;s TED talk on power poses &amp;mdash; feet apart, hands on hips, head thrown back -- has been viewed 37 million times. How did such a flimsy idea become a
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Amy Cuddy's TED talk on power poses — feet apart, hands on hips, head thrown back -- has been viewed 37 million times. How did such a flimsy idea become a sensation?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Leibniz: Protestant Theologian

2016.12.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Irena Backus, Leibniz: Protestant Theologian, Oxford University Press, 2016, 322pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199891849.
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2016.12.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Irena Backus, Leibniz: Protestant Theologian, Oxford University Press, 2016, 322pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199891849. Reviewed by Mogens Lærke, CNRS/ ENS de Lyon Irena Backus' long-awaited monograph focuses on Leibniz's outlook on protestant theology, especially Calvinist theology, from the viewpoint of his own "evangelical" position (that is to say, Lutheran -- but Leibniz disliked the denomination, which he felt was sectarian.) She organizes her study thematically into three parts. The first part, containing two chapters, is about the "Eucharist and Substance." Backus here dedicates the most discussion to demonstrate that Leibniz's philosophical attempts at explaining transubstantiation in texts dating from the De transubstantiatione (1668) to the Examen religionis christianae (1686) were mainly about overcoming challenges to revealed religion posed by Cartesianism. She also, more convincingly,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Epistemological Problems of Perception

[Revised entry by Jack Lyons on December 5, 2016. Changes to: 0] [Editor&#39;s Note: The following new entry by X replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.] The central problem in
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[Revised entry by Jack Lyons on December 5, 2016. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by X replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.] The central problem in the epistemology of perception is that of explaining how perception could give us knowledge or justified belief about an external world, about things outside of ourselves. This problem has...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Fake News II: Facebook

While a thorough analysis of the impact of fake news on the 2016 election will be an ongoing project, there are excellent reasons to believe that it was a real factor. For example, BuzzFeed’s
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While a thorough analysis of the impact of fake news on the 2016 election will be an ongoing project, there are excellent reasons to believe that it was a real factor. For example, BuzzFeed’s analysis showed how the fake news stories outperformed real news stories. When confronted with the claim that fake news on Facebook influenced the election results, Mark Zuckerberg’s initial reaction was denial. However, as critics have pointed out, to say that Facebook does not influence people is to tell advertisers that they are wasting their money on Facebook. While this might be the case, Zuckerberg cannot consistently pitch the influence of Facebook to his customers while denying that it has such influence. One of these claims must be mistaken. While my own observations do not constitute a proper study, I routinely observed people on Facebook treating fake news stories as if they were real.  In some cases, these errors were humorous—people had mistaken satire for real news. In other cases,. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

The museum of the past was one of objects, focused on its permanent collection. The <strong>museum of the future</strong> is a cafe with "art on the side"

The museum of the past was one of objects, focused on its permanent collection. The museum of the future is a cafe with &quot;art on the
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The museum of the past was one of objects, focused on its permanent collection. The museum of the future is a cafe with "art on the side"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Ezra Pound called <strong>Jean Cocteau</strong> -- poet, playwright, theatre director, jeweler -- the best writer in Europe. But his life story was riches-to-rags

Ezra Pound called Jean Cocteau -- poet, playwright, theatre director, jeweler -- the best writer in Europe. But his life story was
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Ezra Pound called Jean Cocteau -- poet, playwright, theatre director, jeweler -- the best writer in Europe. But his life story was riches-to-rags

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Literary culture won't disappear, but it will continue to shrink. "It will go back to what it was when I started out," says <strong>Martin Amis</strong>, "which is a minority interest sphere"

Literary culture won&#39;t disappear, but it will continue to shrink. &quot;It will go back to what it was when I started out,&quot; says Martin Amis, &quot;which is a minority interest
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Literary culture won't disappear, but it will continue to shrink. "It will go back to what it was when I started out," says Martin Amis, "which is a minority interest sphere"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Aesthetics of Argument

2016.12.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Martin Warner, The Aesthetics of Argument, Oxford University Press, 2016, 318pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198737117. Reviewed
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2016.12.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Martin Warner, The Aesthetics of Argument, Oxford University Press, 2016, 318pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198737117. Reviewed by Michael Bell, University of Warwick The nature of thought is notoriously elusive. Is it best understood through its purer and more impersonal forms such as logic or as the outcome of the complex psychic processes in which it is embedded? Nor is it clear how far the available discourse is a help or a hindrance; whether it makes discriminations or creates illusory entities. What do people mean, or think they mean, when they say my heart tells me one thing and my head another? Martin Warner quotes T. S. Eliot's remark that Pascal's dictum 'the heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing', far from exalting the heart over the head or offering 'a defence of unreason' (p. 259), is rather declaring that the heart 'is itself... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The paradoxical intellectualism of Gershom Scholem

Gershom Scholem (1897-1982) is widely known as the founder of the academic study of Jewish mysticism or Kabbalah. In the nearly thirty-five years since his death, Scholem’s star has continue to
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Gershom Scholem (1897-1982) is widely known as the founder of the academic study of Jewish mysticism or Kabbalah. In the nearly thirty-five years since his death, Scholem’s star has continued to shine brightly in the intellectual firmament and perhaps even more brightly now than in his lifetime. This year alone, two books about Scholem are appearing in English, with a third scheduled for next year, and several more in the pipeline. What accounts for this growing fascination with a figure whose field of research was highly esoteric, and inaccessible to those without specialized knowledge? The answer to this question is both sociological and intellectual. Scholem occupied an unusual place among German intellectuals of the twentieth century. A committed Zionist, he left Germany for Palestine in 1923. But, from a cultural point of view, he never really left. He continued throughout his long career to write and publish in German. When Hitler came to power and a flood of German Jewish. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

<strong>Thoreau</strong> comes down to us as an earnest man committed to worthy causes. We do him a disservice when we fail to get his jokes

Thoreau comes down to us as an earnest man committed to worthy causes. We do him a disservice when we fail to get his
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Thoreau comes down to us as an earnest man committed to worthy causes. We do him a disservice when we fail to get his jokes

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily