<p>&ldquo;Free at last, with no money troubles, and able to love, to sing, and to die,&rdquo; Paul Gauguin wrote about Polynesia, as a member of the "<strong>exote school of art</strong>"</p>

&amp;ldquo;Free at last, with no money troubles, and able to love, to sing, and to die,&amp;rdquo; Paul Gauguin wrote about Polynesia, as a member of the &quot;exote school of
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“Free at last, with no money troubles, and able to love, to sing, and to die,” Paul Gauguin wrote about Polynesia, as a member of the "exote school of art"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Moving Spotlight: An Essay on Time and Ontology

2016.08.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ross P. Cameron, The Moving Spotlight: An Essay on Time and Ontology, Oxford University Press, 2015, 219pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.08.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ross P. Cameron, The Moving Spotlight: An Essay on Time and Ontology, Oxford University Press, 2015, 219pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198713296. Reviewed by Meghan Sullivan, University of Notre Dame Moving spotlight theory is finally getting its time in the, er, spotlight. It's long been treated as the one of the most obscure theories of temporal passage, combining the least commonsensical consequence of the B-theory (eternalism) with the most scientifically problematic consequence of the A-theories (the privileged present). But in the space of five years there have been numerous articles and two book-length projects offering sophisticated variants of spotlight theories and defending their coherence and usefulness. Ross P. Cameron has written one such book -- the other is from Bradford Skow -- and Cameron is arguably one of the most sincere defenders of the project[1] The Moving Spotlight is a pitch to. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

A mood, a tint, a taint, danger, virility, possibility, royalty, beauty: parsing the <strong>many meanings of blue</strong>, that most popular of colors&nbsp;

A mood, a tint, a taint, danger, virility, possibility, royalty, beauty: parsing the many meanings of blue, that most popular of
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A mood, a tint, a taint, danger, virility, possibility, royalty, beauty: parsing the many meanings of blue, that most popular of colors 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What does the experimental evidence actually say about the stability of moral intuitions?

Suppose you are sitting at your desk, reflecting on a moral question. Now suppose that as you are reflecting on this question, you happen to be looking around at a somewhat disgusting scene. Perhaps
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Suppose you are sitting at your desk, reflecting on a moral question. Now suppose that as you are reflecting on this question, you happen to be looking around at a somewhat disgusting scene. Perhaps there is a half-eaten apple on the desk, or a bad smell in the room, or maybe you just didn't have an opportunity to wash your hands. I sometimes encounter the claim that experimental studies have shown that people's moral intuitions can be pushed around in surprising ways by subtle situational factors like these. It is then sometimes suggested that philosophers need to think more about the deeper philosophical implications of this kind of 'instability' in our moral intuitions. This claim strikes me as a serious misrepresentation of the present state of the empirical literature. In fact, it might be more accurate to say that existing studies provide evidence that these factors do not influence people's moral intuitions. At the very least, it would be hard to deny that a whole bunch of. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

<strong>S.Y. Agnon</strong>, the only Nobel laureate among Hebrew-language writers, may well be the only modern writer to name himself after one of his stories

S.Y. Agnon, the only Nobel laureate among Hebrew-language writers, may well be the only modern writer to name himself after one of his
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S.Y. Agnon, the only Nobel laureate among Hebrew-language writers, may well be the only modern writer to name himself after one of his stories

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

An ellipsis indicates an absence, making it the language&rsquo;s <strong>most unusual punctuation mark</strong>. Where did it come from, and how did it get so weird?

An ellipsis indicates an absence, making it the language&amp;rsquo;s most unusual punctuation mark. Where did it come from, and how did it get so
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An ellipsis indicates an absence, making it the language’s most unusual punctuation mark. Where did it come from, and how did it get so weird?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<p><strong>S.Y. Agnon</strong>, the only Nobel laureate among Hebrew-language writers, may well be the only modern writer to name himself after one of his stories</p>

S.Y. Agnon, the only Nobel laureate among Hebrew-language writers, may well be the only modern writer to name himself after one of his
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S.Y. Agnon, the only Nobel laureate among Hebrew-language writers, may well be the only modern writer to name himself after one of his stories

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>The wittiest British writer</strong>? Saki, aka Hector Hugh Munro. His writing is full of lunatic clarity: cows could be murderers; ferrets, gods

The wittiest British writer? Saki, aka Hector Hugh Munro. His writing is full of lunatic clarity: cows could be murderers; ferrets,
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The wittiest British writer? Saki, aka Hector Hugh Munro. His writing is full of lunatic clarity: cows could be murderers; ferrets, gods

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<p>An ellipsis indicates an absence, making it the language&rsquo;s <strong>most unusual punctuation mark</strong>. Where did it come from, and how did it get so weird?</p>

An ellipsis indicates an absence, making it the language&amp;rsquo;s most unusual punctuation mark. Where did it come from, and how did it get so
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An ellipsis indicates an absence, making it the language’s most unusual punctuation mark. Where did it come from, and how did it get so weird?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Mary Wollstonecraft

[Revised entry by Sylvana Tomaselli on August 19, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 - 1797) was a moral and political philosopher whose analysis of the condition
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[Revised entry by Sylvana Tomaselli on August 19, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 - 1797) was a moral and political philosopher whose analysis of the condition of women in modern society retains much of its original radicalism. One of the reasons her pronouncements on the subject remain challenging is that her reflections on the status of the female sex were part of an attempt to come to a comprehensive understanding of human relations within a civilization increasingly governed by acquisitiveness and consumption. Her first publication was on the education of daughters; she went on...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy