<strong>When Empson went East</strong>. The literary critic, booted from Cambridge after condoms were discovered in his room, left for Japan and China. It was a professional calamity that proved fortunate&nbsp;

When Empson went East. The literary critic, booted from Cambridge after condoms were discovered in his room, left for Japan and China. It was a professional calamity that proved
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When Empson went East. The literary critic, booted from Cambridge after condoms were discovered in his room, left for Japan and China. It was a professional calamity that proved fortunate 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In <em>Making It</em>, <strong>Norman Podhoretz</strong>, consumed as much by the qualities of failure as by his own success, came to realize what he was against: "losers"

In Making It, Norman Podhoretz, consumed as much by the qualities of failure as by his own success, came to realize what he was against:
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In Making It, Norman Podhoretz, consumed as much by the qualities of failure as by his own success, came to realize what he was against: "losers"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In 1961, a B-list Hollywood figure sought out <strong>J.D. Salinger</strong> to secure film rights to &lt;i&gt;Catcher in the Rye&lt;/i&gt;. Their encounter reads like a "one-act play bound for the theater of the absurd"

In 1961, a B-list Hollywood figure sought out J.D. Salinger to secure film rights to &amp;lt;i&amp;gt;Catcher in the Rye&amp;lt;/i&amp;gt;. Their encounter reads like a &quot;one-act play bound for the theater of the
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In 1961, a B-list Hollywood figure sought out J.D. Salinger to secure film rights to <i>Catcher in the Rye</i>. Their encounter reads like a "one-act play bound for the theater of the absurd"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

How green became green

The original Earth Day Proclamation in 1970 refers to &quot;our beautiful blue planet,&quot; and the first earth day flag consisted of a NASA photo of the Earth on a dark blue background. But the color of
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The original Earth Day Proclamation in 1970 refers to “our beautiful blue planet,” and the first earth day flag consisted of a NASA photo of the Earth on a dark blue background. But the color of fields and forests prevailed, and today when we think of ecology and environmentalism, we think green not blue. The connection of the color green to growing things is found in nature, of course, and the word green has “associations with verdure, freshness, newness, health, and vitality [that are] are widespread among the Germanic languages,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary. So in Old and early Middle English, we find forms of the word used to refer to the color of living vegetation, grass, and to grassy areas or leafy trees. The meaning was extended to refer especially to tender or unripe vegetation and then more generally. The expression “green cheese,” for example, from the late fourteenth century, refers to cheese that still needed to be aged.. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

<strong>Conrad Aiken&rsquo;s poetry</strong> is often dismissed as literary &ldquo;navel-gazing.&rdquo; But consider his sense of grandeur: His tombstone read &ldquo;Cosmos Mariner &mdash; Destination Unknown&rdquo;

Conrad Aiken&amp;rsquo;s poetry is often dismissed as literary &amp;ldquo;navel-gazing.&amp;rdquo; But consider his sense of grandeur: His tombstone read &amp;ldquo;Cosmos Mariner &amp;mdash; Destination
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Conrad Aiken’s poetry is often dismissed as literary “navel-gazing.” But consider his sense of grandeur: His tombstone read “Cosmos Mariner — Destination Unknown”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

On multiple realization

There’s no overestimating the significance of the multiple realization thesis in the past fifty years of theorizing about the mind’s relationship to the brain. The idea behind the thesis is simple
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There’s no overestimating the significance of the multiple realization thesis in the past fifty years of theorizing about the mind’s relationship to the brain. The idea behind the thesis is simple enough, and most easily explained in terms of a comparison. Suppose you thought that the relationship between the mind and the brain is like that between water and H2O. This latter relationship involves an identity. To say that water is H2O is to claim that the kind water just is the kind H2O. Where there’s one, there’s the other; the words ‘water’ and ‘H2O’ are just different ways of referring to the same thing. Similarly, you might suppose, where there are minds there are brains, and the words ‘mind’ and ‘brain’ are just two different ways of talking about the same thing. It’s the idea that minds are brains that the multiple realization thesis is meant to challenge. However, unlike the dualist, who denies mind-brain identity on the grounds that minds are a sui generis kind of spooky. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

<strong>Against celebrity profiles</strong>. They&rsquo;re manufactured, devoid of connection between subject and writer, and fail to reveal the self-delusions and rationalizations that make people interesting

Against celebrity profiles. They&amp;rsquo;re manufactured, devoid of connection between subject and writer, and fail to reveal the self-delusions and rationalizations that make people
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Against celebrity profiles. They’re manufactured, devoid of connection between subject and writer, and fail to reveal the self-delusions and rationalizations that make people interesting

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>How biography works</strong>. It isn't merely a mode of historical inquiry, &ldquo;but an act of imaginative faith,&rdquo; says Richard Holmes, who has spent his life pursuing subjects through the past

How biography works. It isn&#39;t merely a mode of historical inquiry, &amp;ldquo;but an act of imaginative faith,&amp;rdquo; says Richard Holmes, who has spent his life pursuing subjects through the
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How biography works. It isn't merely a mode of historical inquiry, “but an act of imaginative faith,” says Richard Holmes, who has spent his life pursuing subjects through the past

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Conrad Aiken&rsquo;s poetry</strong> is often dismissed as literary &ldquo;navel-gazing.&rdquo; But consider his ambition and sense of grandeur: His tombstone read &ldquo;Cosmos Mariner &mdash; Destination Unknown&rdquo;

Conrad Aiken&amp;rsquo;s poetry is often dismissed as literary &amp;ldquo;navel-gazing.&amp;rdquo; But consider his ambition and sense of grandeur: His tombstone read &amp;ldquo;Cosmos Mariner &amp;mdash; Destination
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Conrad Aiken’s poetry is often dismissed as literary “navel-gazing.” But consider his ambition and sense of grandeur: His tombstone read “Cosmos Mariner — Destination Unknown”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Is Some Red Line Better Than No Red Line?

Embed from Getty Images There is a reasonable concern that can be raised in response to my view that the red line should be drawn at the murder of civilians rather than at murdering them with
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Embed from Getty Images There is a reasonable concern that can be raised in response to my view that the red line should be drawn at the murder of civilians rather than at murdering them with chemical weapons. This is the worry that my view would abandon the red line being drawn for using chemical weapons against civilians, thus creating a situation in which there are no red lines. This would be problematic because while the murder of civilians with conventional weapons is tolerable, crossing the red line of murdering civilians with chemical weapons does at least generate a response. Since some response from the world is better than no response, it is clearly better to have some viable red line rather than one everyone will simply ignore. The tolerance of conventional murder and opposition to chemical murder has resulted in some actions whose impact should be duly assessed, to get some picture of the value of the chemical red line. One impact that has been touted by some former. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy