Oppressively earnest, quick to take offense, an aggressive drunk &mdash; <strong>Grace Hartigan</strong> didn&rsquo;t make things easy for her friends, who included Frankenthaler, O&rsquo;Hara, and Ashbery

Oppressively earnest, quick to take offense, an aggressive drunk &amp;mdash; Grace Hartigan didn&amp;rsquo;t make things easy for her friends, who included Frankenthaler, O&amp;rsquo;Hara, and
Philosophy News image
Oppressively earnest, quick to take offense, an aggressive drunk — Grace Hartigan didn’t make things easy for her friends, who included Frankenthaler, O’Hara, and Ashbery

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

If <strong>Christopher Hitchens</strong> was so good &mdash; clever, fearless, well read &mdash; why so bad? If he was so right, why so wrong?

If Christopher Hitchens was so good &amp;mdash; clever, fearless, well read &amp;mdash; why so bad? If he was so right, why so
Philosophy News image
If Christopher Hitchens was so good — clever, fearless, well read — why so bad? If he was so right, why so wrong?

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>How societies make progress</strong>. It can't be engineered or managed, as technocrats and many academics thinks. Rather, social institutions evolve

How societies make progress. It can&#39;t be engineered or managed, as technocrats and many academics thinks. Rather, social institutions
Philosophy News image
How societies make progress. It can't be engineered or managed, as technocrats and many academics thinks. Rather, social institutions evolve

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Reasons without Persons: Rationality, Identity, and Time

2016.04.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Brian Hedden, Reasons without Persons: Rationality, Identity, and Time, Oxford University Press, 2015, 210pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN
Philosophy News image
2016.04.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Brian Hedden, Reasons without Persons: Rationality, Identity, and Time, Oxford University Press, 2015, 210pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198732594. Reviewed by Heidi Savage, SUNY Geneseo This is a well-written, ambitious book that ties disparate strands of philosophy together into a complete picture of what is required for an agent to be rational -- theories of personhood and theories of epistemic and practical rationality. To my knowledge, this is something only Derek Parfit has been successful at tackling thus far. In general, the book is knowledgeable and an interesting read. While these are certainly laudatory features, still, there is room for improvement. For instance, Brian Hedden spends a good amount of time exploring other logically possible views only to dismiss them or to show how his view is consistent with them, when instead he could be more usefully focused on exploring the underlying assumptions. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

North Carolina’s Anti-Antidiscrimination Law

Embed from Getty Images Apparently eager to do some serious damage to North Carolina’s reputation and economy, the state’s Republican controlled legislature passed “the bathroom bill” and the
Philosophy News image
Embed from Getty Images Apparently eager to do some serious damage to North Carolina’s reputation and economy, the state’s Republican controlled legislature passed “the bathroom bill” and the Republican governor signed it immediately. This law seems to have been in response to Charlotte, North Carolina passing a city ordinance extending legal protection for LGBT people and allowing transgender folks to use bathrooms based on their gender identity. The “bathroom bill” makes it so that local governments cannot pass their own antidiscrimination laws—the state law, which is more restrictive than the Charlotte ordinance, trumps all local laws. The reason it is called the “bathroom bill” is that it has the effect of forbidding transgender people from using the bathroom that matches their gender identity. Instead, they must use the bathroom that matches the sex on their birth certificate. Interestingly enough, the law also precludes any local government from passing its own minimum wage. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Talking Philosophy

Three Doctoral Fellowships

Job List:&amp;nbsp; Europe Name of institution:&amp;nbsp; International Academy of
Philosophy News image
Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
International Academy of Philosophy
Town: 
Mauren
Country: 
Liechtenstein . . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Mysticism in Arabic and Islamic Philosophy

[Revised entry by Mehdi Aminrazavi on April 13, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Mysticism in the Islamic context has traditionally been intertwined with the notion of Ḥikmah, which is
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Mehdi Aminrazavi on April 13, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Mysticism in the Islamic context has traditionally been intertwined with the notion of Ḥikmah, which is at once both wisdom and philosophy (Nasr 1996). The source of mysticism and the mystical elements in Islam are to be traced to the Qur'an and the Islamic doctrine itself. Some of the Qur'anic verses have been viewed by the mystics and philosopher-mystics of Islam as allegorical and esoteric hints for those who can see them. "God is the...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Hume's Aesthetics

[Revised entry by Theodore Gracyk on April 13, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] David Hume&#39;s views on aesthetic theory and the philosophy of art are to be found in his work on moral
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Theodore Gracyk on April 13, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] David Hume's views on aesthetic theory and the philosophy of art are to be found in his work on moral theory and in several essays. Although there is a tendency to emphasize the two essays devoted to art, "Of the Standard of Taste" and "Of Tragedy," his views on art and aesthetic judgment are intimately connected to his moral philosophy and theories of human thought and emotion. His theory of taste and beauty is not entirely original, but his arguments generally display the keen analysis typical of his best work. Hume's archaic terminology is occasionally an obstacle to appreciating his analysis, inviting conflicting readings of his position....

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Baffled by the rise of ISIS? Spasms of barbarism are the norm when <strong>modernization outpaces civilization</strong>. John Gray explains

Baffled by the rise of ISIS? Spasms of barbarism are the norm when modernization outpaces civilization. John Gray
Philosophy News image
Baffled by the rise of ISIS? Spasms of barbarism are the norm when modernization outpaces civilization. John Gray explains

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>What makes a dog a dog</strong>? Forty-two teeth, advanced auditory and olfactory senses, tight-knit social structure. But really it's all about food

What makes a dog a dog? Forty-two teeth, advanced auditory and olfactory senses, tight-knit social structure. But really it&#39;s all about
Philosophy News image
What makes a dog a dog? Forty-two teeth, advanced auditory and olfactory senses, tight-knit social structure. But really it's all about food

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily