When <strong>Martin Luther</strong> nailed an essay to the door of a German church, he forever altered what books look like and how they're marketed and written

When Martin Luther nailed an essay to the door of a German church, he forever altered what books look like and how they&#39;re marketed and
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When Martin Luther nailed an essay to the door of a German church, he forever altered what books look like and how they're marketed and written

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Being Noam Chomsky's assistant</strong> means greeting students, political prisoners, politicians, musicians, overwhelmed fans, Cirque du Soleil clowns, lost souls

Being Noam Chomsky&#39;s assistant means greeting students, political prisoners, politicians, musicians, overwhelmed fans, Cirque du Soleil clowns, lost
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Being Noam Chomsky's assistant means greeting students, political prisoners, politicians, musicians, overwhelmed fans, Cirque du Soleil clowns, lost souls

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Debating the brain drain: an excerpt on emigration

While there has been considerable normative theo&#173;rizing on the topic of immigration, most analyses have focused on the relation between the migrant or prospective migrant and the society she will
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In October, authors Gillian Brock and Michael Blake wrote in insightful post on the high levels of migration of talented people from underdeveloped countries to developed ones. Below is an excerpt from their book, Debating Brain Drain, which provides more background information on this concerning issue. The basic needs of desperately poor people rightly command our normative attention. We are concerned not only about the fact that there is poverty and unmet need in the world today, but also the scale of this needi­ness—so many in the world lack the basic necessities for a decent life. Some of these widespread, severe deprivations include lack of food, clean water, basic healthcare, primary education, basic security, infrastructure, and an environ­ment that can sustain and ensure secure access to these goods and services. An important part of enjoying the basic goods and services necessary for a decent life is the availability of skilled personnel able to provide these. Here there are. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Assistant Teaching Professor

Job List:&amp;nbsp; Americas Name of institution:&amp;nbsp; Northeastern
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Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
Northeastern University
Town: 
Boston
Country: 
USA
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Predictive brains, sentient robots, and the embodied self

Is the human brain just a rag-bag of different tricks and stratagems, slowly accumulated over evolutionary time? For many years, I thought the answer to this question was most probably ‘yes’. The
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Is the human brain just a rag-bag of different tricks and stratagems, slowly accumulated over evolutionary time? For many years, I thought the answer to this question was most probably ‘yes’. Sure, brains were fantastic organs for adaptive success. But the idea that there might be just a few core principles whose operation lay at the heart of much neural processing was not one that had made it on to my personal hit-list. Seminal work on Artificial Neural Networks had shown great promise. But it led not to a new and unifying vision of the brain so much as a plethora of cool engineering solutions to specific problems and puzzles. Meantime, the sciences of the mind were looking increasingly outwards, making huge strides in understanding how bodily form, action, and the canny use of environmental structures were co-operating with neural processes. This was the revolution summarily dubbed ‘embodied cognition’. My personal grail, though, was always something rather more systematic: a. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

The <strong>literature of listening</strong>. Flaubert called himself a human pen; Svetlana Alexievich, a recent Nobel laureate, calls herself a human ear

The literature of listening. Flaubert called himself a human pen; Svetlana Alexievich, a recent Nobel laureate, calls herself a human
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The literature of listening. Flaubert called himself a human pen; Svetlana Alexievich, a recent Nobel laureate, calls herself a human ear

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

As a playwright, <strong>Arthur Miller</strong> was confident of his talent.&nbsp;&nbsp;As an essayist, he played interested amateur. It was an act

As a playwright, Arthur Miller was confident of his talent.&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;As an essayist, he played interested amateur. It was an
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As a playwright, Arthur Miller was confident of his talent.  As an essayist, he played interested amateur. It was an act

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The student revolt in Paris in 1968 gave rise to a generation of leftist thinkers and turned <strong>Roger Scruton</strong> into a conservative. At 71, he's still settling scores

The student revolt in Paris in 1968 gave rise to a generation of leftist thinkers and turned Roger Scruton into a conservative. At 71, he&#39;s still settling
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The student revolt in Paris in 1968 gave rise to a generation of leftist thinkers and turned Roger Scruton into a conservative. At 71, he's still settling scores

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Talk is cheap: diverse dignities at the centre of mental disorder

It may be fairly easy to say that the dignity of a person in the domain of psychiatry should be respected. Justification is easy to find. For example, the South African Constitution proclaims
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It may be fairly easy to say that the dignity of a person in the domain of psychiatry should be respected. Justification is easy to find. For example, the South African Constitution proclaims ‘everyone has inherent dignity and the right to have their dignity respected and protected.’ When simply a pretence, this kind of talk is obviously cheap. But pretence isn’t the only reason behind such statements. Cheap talk presents as a gap between a principle and its practice. In paying lip-service to the principle, ‘respect’ becomes a mere token of respect rather than the real McCoy, with that being the action of holding the dignity of the person in high regard. And before prematurely thinking of course, I do that, recognise the taxing challenges in doing so. I highlight here two major challenges in the practice of holding the dignity of a person in high regard: recognising the effects mental disorder has on one’s dignity, and accounting for the diversity of ways. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Threat Assessment II: Demons of Fear & Anger

Embed from Getty Images In the previous essay on threat assessment I looked at the influence of availability heuristics and fallacies that directly relate to errors in reasoning about statistics and
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Embed from Getty Images In the previous essay on threat assessment I looked at the influence of availability heuristics and fallacies that directly relate to errors in reasoning about statistics and probability. This essay continues the discussion by exploring the influence of fear and anger on threat assessment. As noted in the previous essay, a rational assessment of a threat involves properly considering how likely it is that a threat will occur and, if it occurs, how severe the consequences might be. As might be suspected, the influence of fear and anger can cause people to engage in poor threat assessment that overestimates the likelihood of a threat or the severity of the threat. One common starting point for anger and fear is the stereotype. Roughly put, a stereotype is an uncritical generalization about a group. While stereotypes are generally thought of as being negative (that is, attributing undesirable traits such as laziness or greed), there are also positive. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy