Trump & the Third Party

Embed from Getty Images Trump’s ongoing success has created quite a disturbance in the Republican establishment. While some have merely expressed opposition to him, there is a growing “never Trump”
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Embed from Getty Images Trump’s ongoing success has created quite a disturbance in the Republican establishment. While some have merely expressed opposition to him, there is a growing “never Trump” movement. While this movement is currently focused on preventing Trump from becoming the candidate by supporting his few remaining opponents, there has been some talk of putting forth a third party candidate. Third party candidates are nothing new in the United States. Ralph Nader made a bid on the left for president and Ross Perot made an attempt on the libertarian side. The main impact of these attempts was to pull voters from one party and enable the other party to win. For example, Ralph Nader helped defeat Al Gore. As such, the most likely effect of a conservative third party candidate running against Trump and Hillary would be a victory for Hillary. Given that the main concern of most political partisans is the victory of their party, it might be wondered why a third party option. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Ernst Cassirer

[Revised entry by Michael Friedman on March 18, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Ernst Cassirer occupies a unique place in twentieth-century philosophy. His work pays equal attention to
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[Revised entry by Michael Friedman on March 18, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Ernst Cassirer occupies a unique place in twentieth-century philosophy. His work pays equal attention to foundational and epistemological issues in the philosophy of mathematics and natural science and to aesthetics, the philosophy of history, and other issues in the "cultural sciences" broadly conceived. More than any other German philosopher since Kant, Cassirer thus aims to devote equal philosophical attention both to the (mathematical and) natural sciences...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Trinity

[Revised entry by Dale Tuggy on March 18, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The traditional Christian doctrine of the Trinity is commonly expressed as the statement that the one God
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[Revised entry by Dale Tuggy on March 18, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The traditional Christian doctrine of the Trinity is commonly expressed as the statement that the one God exists as or in three equally divine "persons,", the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Every significant concept in this statement (God, exists, as or in, equally divine, person) has been variously understood. The guiding principle has been the creedal declaration that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit of the New Testament are consubstantial (i.e. the same in substance or essence, Greek: homoousios). Because...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Galen

[New Entry by P. N. Singer on March 18, 2016.] Galen (Galēnos, 129 - c. 200 CE) was primarily a medical author, but had a deep engagement with and influence on the philosophical debates of his
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[New Entry by P. N. Singer on March 18, 2016.] Galen (Galēnos, 129 - c. 200 CE) was primarily a medical author, but had a deep engagement with and influence on the philosophical debates of his time. He wrote many works of logic and ethics, and also addressed those and other philosophical questions - especially of epistemology, causation in the natural world, and philosophy of mind - in his medical-scientific writings. His medical, and in some contexts his philosophical, work had enormous influence throughout the medieval period and even later,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Does the novel provide&nbsp;communitarian mortar, showing us how to live together? Or &mdash; in an age of connectivity &mdash; does it teach us&nbsp;<strong>how to be separate</strong>?

Does the novel provide&amp;nbsp;communitarian mortar, showing us how to live together? Or &amp;mdash; in an age of connectivity &amp;mdash; does it teach us&amp;nbsp;how to be
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Does the novel provide communitarian mortar, showing us how to live together? Or — in an age of connectivity — does it teach us how to be separate?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

This history of the<strong> 20th-century literary world</strong> is one of artistic insecurity. &ldquo;What I suffer from,&rdquo; said Alfred Kazin, is &ldquo;the lack of&nbsp; a working philosophy&rdquo;

This history of the 20th-century literary world is one of artistic insecurity. &amp;ldquo;What I suffer from,&amp;rdquo; said Alfred Kazin, is &amp;ldquo;the lack of&amp;nbsp; a working
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This history of the 20th-century literary world is one of artistic insecurity. “What I suffer from,” said Alfred Kazin, is “the lack of  a working philosophy”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

How a cocky amateur violinist became a professional thief. The tale of the <strong>stolen Stradivarius</strong> has to do with the wall between one&rsquo;s past and one&rsquo;s present

How a cocky amateur violinist became a professional thief. The tale of the stolen Stradivarius has to do with the wall between one&amp;rsquo;s past and one&amp;rsquo;s
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How a cocky amateur violinist became a professional thief. The tale of the stolen Stradivarius has to do with the wall between one’s past and one’s present

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Problem of Universals in Contemporary Philosophy

2016.03.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gabriele Galluzzo and Michael J. Loux (eds.), The Problem of Universals in Contemporary Philosophy, Cambridge University Press,
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2016.03.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gabriele Galluzzo and Michael J. Loux (eds.), The Problem of Universals in Contemporary Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, 2015, 229pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107100893. Reviewed by Nikk Effingham, University of Birmingham This is a collection of papers on the ontology of properties, universals, tropes, etc. All of the papers are focussed on these purely ontological matters, with no crossover into other areas. Not that this is a complaint -- all too often attempts at innovation are sourced in such impurity, shoehorning discussions about a round philosophical matter into the square hole of another. It's good, then, to see that the collection has a clear, straightforward aim at the outset which it then delivers on. There are nine papers, plus an introduction by the editors. Michael J. Loux and Peter van Inwagen write on constituent ontologies: that properties are 'constituents' of other things and that. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Group Rights

[Revised entry by Peter Jones on March 17, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A group right is a right held by a group as a group rather than by its members severally. The &quot;group&quot; in
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[Revised entry by Peter Jones on March 17, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A group right is a right held by a group as a group rather than by its members severally. The "group" in "group right" describes the nature of the right-holder; it does not describe the mere fact that the right is confined to the members of a group rather than possessed by all members of a society or by humanity at large. Much of the controversy that surrounds group rights focuses on whether groups can hold rights and, if they can, on the conditions...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

In an academic and intellectual culture that emphasizes safe and comforting patterns of thought, what becomes of free thinking - and what happens to the <strong>clash of ideas</strong>?

In an academic and intellectual culture that emphasizes safe and comforting patterns of thought, what becomes of free thinking - and what happens to the clash of
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In an academic and intellectual culture that emphasizes safe and comforting patterns of thought, what becomes of free thinking - and what happens to the clash of ideas?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily