Robust Ethics: The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Godless Normative Realism

2015.03.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Erik J. Weilenberg, Robust Ethics: The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Godless Normative Realism, Oxford University Press, 2014,
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2015.03.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Erik J. Weilenberg, Robust Ethics: The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Godless Normative Realism, Oxford University Press, 2014, 196pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198714323. Reviewed by Terence Cuneo, University of Vermont Twenty-five years ago, no one would've predicted that "robust" or nonnaturalist realism would become the most lively research program in metaethics. But so it is, and Erik Wielenberg's new book is testament to this research program's continued vitality. Two characteristics distinguish Wielenberg's book from other recent defenses of robust realism. First, Wielenberg takes not just naturalistic but also theistic alternatives to robust realism seriously, arguing that non-theistic robust realism "is at least as plausible" as theistic versions of moral realism (x). Second, Wielenberg engages extensively with recent work in empirical psychology, arguing that, far from posing skeptical challenges. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

After Hegel: German Philosophy, 1840-1900

2015.03.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Frederick C. Beiser, After Hegel: German Philosophy, 1840-1900, Princeton University Press, 2014, 232pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN
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2015.03.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Frederick C. Beiser, After Hegel: German Philosophy, 1840-1900, Princeton University Press, 2014, 232pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780691163093. Reviewed by Rudolf A. Makkreel, Emory University This is a history of nineteenth century German philosophy after Hegel that gives thinkers such as Adolf Trendelenburg, Hermann Lotze, Wilhelm Dilthey and Eduard von Hartmann pride of place instead of the usual Germanic figures of Feuerbach, Marx, Kierkegaard and Nietzsche. Although Trendelenburg, Lotze and Dilthey were professors at the University of Berlin, this is by no means merely a history of academic philosophy, for it engages many wider intellectual debates. It is a useful volume that fills in some gaps in standard histories. Frederick Beiser focuses on the crisis of identity that philosophy faced after the death of Hegel in 1831. His narrative starts in 1840, the year in which Trendelenburg (1802-72) published his. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Postdoctoral Fellow in Normative Theory

Job List:  Americas Name of institution:  Centre for Ethics, University of
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Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
Town: 
Toronto
Country: 
Canada . . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Zombies

[Revised entry by Robert Kirk on March 16, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Zombies in philosophy are imaginary creatures designed to illuminate problems about consciousness and its
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[Revised entry by Robert Kirk on March 16, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Zombies in philosophy are imaginary creatures designed to illuminate problems about consciousness and its relation to the physical world. Unlike those in films or witchcraft, they are exactly like us in all physical respects but without conscious experiences: by definition there is 'nothing it is like' to be a zombie. Yet zombies behave just like us, and some even spend a lot of time discussing consciousness....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Better than the Truth

While my adopted state of Florida has many interesting tales, perhaps the most famous is the story of Juan Ponce de León’s quest to find the fountain of youth. As the name suggests, this enchanted
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: Fountain of Youth Park. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) While my adopted state of Florida has many interesting tales, perhaps the most famous is the story of Juan Ponce de León’s quest to find the fountain of youth. As the name suggests, this enchanted fountain was supposed to grant eternal life to those who drank of (or bathed in) its waters. While the fountain of youth is regarded as a mere myth, it turns out that the story about Juan Ponce de León’s quest is also a fiction. And not just a fiction—a slander. In 1511, or so the new history goes, Ponce was forced to resign his post as governor of Puerto Rico. King Ferdinand offered Ponce an opportunity: if he could find Bimini, it would be his. That, and not the fountain of youth, was the object of his quest. In support of this, J. Michael Francis of the University of South Florida, claims that the documents of the time make no mention of a fountain of youth. According to Francis, a fellow named Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

On Raymond Williams

Read Raymond Williams. Only a coterie of Marxists, academics, students, and wonderful oddballs like Geoff Dyer still do. Too bad…
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Read Raymond Williams. Only a coterie of Marxists, academics, students, and wonderful oddballs like Geoff Dyer still do. Too bad… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Axe-wielding Amazons

Among the Amazons. Did a tattooed tribe of horseback riders smoke cannabis, drink fermented mare’s milk, and fight alongside men?…
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Among the Amazons. Did a tattooed tribe of horseback riders smoke cannabis, drink fermented mare’s milk, and fight alongside men?… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

MFA Writing Programs

“For the most part, M.F.A. students who choose to write memoirs are narcissists using the genre as therapy.” But candor is no excuse for incompetence…
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“For the most part, M.F.A. students who choose to write memoirs are narcissists using the genre as therapy.” But candor is no excuse for incompetence… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Augustine's Confessions: Philosophy in Autobiography

2015.03.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews William E. Mann (ed.), Augustine's Confessions: Philosophy in Autobiography, Oxford University Press, 2014, 223pp., $65.00 (hbk),
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2015.03.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews William E. Mann (ed.), Augustine's Confessions: Philosophy in Autobiography, Oxford University Press, 2014, 223pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199577552. Reviewed by John Rist, The Catholic University of America This is an unusually philosophical — thus very welcome — book about the Confessions. Its aim is to break new ground, and as is normal with such exploration some of the earth turns out to be stony — though in this case the great mass is fertile. For it is surprising (at first sight) if after so many ‘Augustinian’ centuries much new philosophical territory remains to be explored in Augustine’s work, let alone in the Confessions. But that misjudgement arises in no small part from restrictive or reductionist ideas about what counts as philosophical enquiry. Certainly the Confessions is hardly a philosophical textbook, or even a philosophical treatise, but William E.. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Courage in the Democratic Polis: Ideology and Critique in Classical Athens

2015.03.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ryan K. Balot, Courage in the Democratic Polis: Ideology and Critique in Classical Athens, Oxford University Press, 2014, 408pp.,
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2015.03.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ryan K. Balot, Courage in the Democratic Polis: Ideology and Critique in Classical Athens, Oxford University Press, 2014, 408pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199982158. Reviewed by Chloe Balla, University of Crete This book is an excellent discussion of early theoretical reflections on andreia (a term derived from the Greek word for man, ἀνήρ, and translated mostly as 'courage' but, depending on the context, also as 'manliness'). Through a thoughtful analysis of the sources, Ryan Balot allows us to understand the role of this cardinal virtue in the construction of competing values that shaped the antithesis between Athenian democracy and its non-democratic rivals. The starting point of his narrative is a statement from Pericles' Funeral Oration, which shows the Athenians' distinctive understanding of courage: "for we differ in this: that we ourselves, the same men, both dare [τολμᾶν] the most and calculate about. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News