Husserl's Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction

2014.06.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dermot Moran, Husserl's Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction, Cambridge University
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2014.06.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dermot Moran, Husserl's Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction, Cambridge University Press, 2012, 323pp., $28.99 (pbk), ISBN 9780521719698. Reviewed by Thane Martin Naberhaus, Mount St. Mary's University Any book that announces in its very title that it will concern itself with a "crisis of the European sciences" immediately invites the suspicion that its ambitions are absurdly overinflated. And indeed, Husserl, in the work that has come to be known simply as "the Crisis," makes no effort to hide his aspirations -- and the sense of grave urgency that fuels them. As philosophers living in the present-day world-situation, he tells us in the first, introductory part, we have fallen into a "painful existential contradiction" (Crisis, 17).[1] Besieged on all sides by doubt about the very possibility of knowledge, in danger of drowning in the "skeptical deluge" (Crisis,. . .

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Cult and conspiracy

Euripides, Schiller, Umberto Eco, and … Dan Brown? In the literature of the arcane, now as then, conspiracy is key…
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Euripides, Schiller, Umberto Eco, and … Dan Brown? In the literature of the arcane, now as then, conspiracy is key… more»

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Theory of disruptive innovation

Consultants, conferences, seminars: Everyone is disrupting or being disrupted. The theory is hugely influential. And almost certainly wrong…
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Consultants, conferences, seminars: Everyone is disrupting or being disrupted. The theory is hugely influential. And almost certainly wrong… more»

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What Is Literature?

The canon has been bloodied by a decades-long assault of politicized professors and theory-happy revisionists. But the idea of the canon endures…
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The canon has been bloodied by a decades-long assault of politicized professors and theory-happy revisionists. But the idea of the canon endures… more»

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Replacing Truth

2014.06.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kevin Scharp, Replacing Truth, Oxford University Press, 2013, 325pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199653850. Reviewed by David
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2014.06.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kevin Scharp, Replacing Truth, Oxford University Press, 2013, 325pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199653850. Reviewed by David Ripley, University of Connecticut In the first half or so of this book, Kevin Scharp argues first that the concept of truth (understood here as one whose constitutive principles, taken together, have some false consequences (p. 36)) is inconsistent; second that it is thereby unsuitable for use in 'serious theorizing' (p. 134); and finally that it should be replaced with (consistent) successor concepts designed to be able to do the theoretical work we want truth to do. He devotes the remainder of the book to the presentation, discussion, and deployment of a particular pair of such successor concepts, which he dubs ascending truth and descending truth. Chapter 1 quickly surveys the vast philosophical literature on truth, dividing it into two camps: 'philosophical approaches', which focus. . .

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Maleficent & Rape: Rape Culture

In my previous essay I focused on the matter of metaphors in the context of Hayley Krischer’s claim that the movie Maleficent includes a rape scene. In this essay I will take on a rather more
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Maleficent’s dragon form as it appears in the climax of the film. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) In my previous essay I focused on the matter of metaphors in the context of Hayley Krischer’s claim that the movie Maleficent includes a rape scene. In this essay I will take on a rather more controversial matter, namely the question of why it might matter as to whether the movie contains the alleged rape scene or not. This might result in some hostile responses. It might be wondered what taking the scene as a metaphor (or implied) rape adds to the work. One might say “Maleficent is betrayed and mutilated—what does adding the idea that this is a rape metaphor add? Does not the betrayal and mutilation suffice to serve the purpose of the narrative or does it need to be believed that this is a metaphorical rape?” One way to answer the question would be to focus on aesthetic matters: does accepting the rape metaphor enhance the aesthetic value of the work? That is, is it a better film on that. . .

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About Stefan Zweig

Affluent Austrian, wandering Jew, prolific author, Pan-European humanist, cheap populist, dandy, depressive, unblinking stoic: Who was Stefan Zweig?…
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Affluent Austrian, wandering Jew, prolific author, Pan-European humanist, cheap populist, dandy, depressive, unblinking stoic: Who was Stefan Zweig?… more»

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Voyage of Patrick Leigh Fermor

In life and love, Patrick Leigh Fermor liked to meander. His charm was considerable, but not foolproof. To Somerset Maugham, he was a “middle-class gigolo for upper-class women”…
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In life and love, Patrick Leigh Fermor liked to meander. His charm was considerable, but not foolproof. To Somerset Maugham, he was a “middle-class gigolo for upper-class women”… more»

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Drinking female writers

Jean Rhys, Elizabeth Bishop, Marguerite Duras: How is it that these women, so very bad at living, were so very good at writing about it?…
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Jean Rhys, Elizabeth Bishop, Marguerite Duras: How is it that these women, so very bad at living, were so very good at writing about it?… more»

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On fatherhood

Philosophers tend to be terrified of bodies, so having sex can be a problem. John Kaag managed. But then he faced the question of fatherhood…
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Philosophers tend to be terrified of bodies, so having sex can be a problem. John Kaag managed. But then he faced the question of fatherhood… more»

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