CFP: Society of Christian Philosophers Pacific Regional Conference

The End of Religion? March 17 – 19, 2016 Keynote Speakers Gordon Graham (Princeton Theological Seminary) Philip Jenkins (Baylor University) The US is currently in the midst of what pundits are
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The End of Religion? March 17 – 19, 2016 Keynote Speakers Gordon Graham (Princeton Theological Seminary) Philip Jenkins (Baylor University) The US is currently in the midst of what pundits are calling the ‘Great Decline’ in religiosity. Data suggest that the US is, in this respect, catching up to secular Europe and that within our [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Philosophers and their religious practices part 11: The Wesley experience

This is the eleventh installment of a series of interviews I am conducting with academic philosophers about their religious practices. In this series of interviews, I ask philosophers about their
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This is the eleventh installment of a series of interviews I am conducting with academic philosophers about their religious practices. In this series of interviews, I ask philosophers about their religious practices and the influence on their philosophical work. Follow the links for parts1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. The contributors are in various stages of [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Planned Parenthood & Fetal Tissue I: Selling for Profit?

View image | gettyimages.com Thanks to undercover videos released by an anti-abortion group, Planned Parenthood is once again the focus of public and media attention. This situation has brought
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View image | gettyimages.com Thanks to undercover videos released by an anti-abortion group, Planned Parenthood is once again the focus of public and media attention. This situation has brought up many moral issues that are well worth considering. One matter of concern is the claim that Planned Parenthood has engaged in selling aborted fetuses for profit. The edited videos certainly seem crafted to create the impression that Planned Parenthood was haggling over the payments it would receive for aborted fetuses to be used in research and also considering changing the methods of abortion to ensure higher quality “product.” Since clever editing can make almost anything seem rather bad, it is a good general rule of critical thinking to look beyond such video. In this case the unedited video is also available, thus allowing people to get the context of the remarks. There is, however, still reasonable general concerns about what happened off camera as well as the impact of crafting and. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Coleridge’s way with words

Why should we commemorate Samuel Taylor Coleridge? The obvious reason is his high status as a poet, but a better one might be his exuberance as a wordsmith. As a poet, after all, he is widely known
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Why should we commemorate Samuel Taylor Coleridge? The obvious reason is his high status as a poet, but a better one might be his exuberance as a wordsmith. As a poet, after all, he is widely known for only two relatively short works: ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’ and ‘Kubla Khan.’ While the academy would no doubt add four or five others prized by specialists, the total number is still small. On the other hand, Coleridge’s creative output as a word worker—inventing, importing, adapting, and generally messing about with language—is enormous, his impact incalculable. His collected works now fill 50 volumes in the standard scholarly editions, and his mastery of the arts of language is evident in every one of them. Coleridge in the OED Since his prose had a respectable following in the nineteenth century, when much of his informal writing (letters, notebooks, and marginalia) also found its way into print, his works were a mainstay of James Murray’s NED (New English Dictionary on. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Linguistics

Curry paradox cycles

A 'Liar cycle' is a finite sequence of sentences where each sentence in the sequence except the last says that the next sentence is false, and where the final sentence in the sequence says that the
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A Liar cycle is a finite sequence of sentences where each sentence in the sequence except the last says that the next sentence is false, and where the final sentence in the sequence says that the first sentence is false. Thus, the 2-Liar cycle (also known as the No-No paradox or the Open Pair) is: S1:        Sentence S2 is false. S2:        Sentence S1 is false. And the 3-Liar cycle is: S1:        Sentence S2 is false. S2:        Sentence S3 is false. S3:        Sentence S1 is false. The Liar paradox itself is just the 1-Liar cyle (where the Liar sentence plays the role of both the first sentence and the last sentence in the sequence of length one): S1:        Sentence S1 is false. We can prove, for any finite number n, that if n is odd then there is no stable assignment of truth and falsity to each sentence – that is, that the sequence is paradoxical, and if n is even then there are exactly two distinct stable assignments of truth and falsity (the trick is noticing that any stable. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Symposium: Freedom & Virtue: Re-Inventing Free Institutions in an Era of Globalization

Conference Name:Symposium: Freedom & Virtue: Re-Inventing Free Institutions in an Era of Globalization Conference Dates: August 6-9, 2015Submission Date: April 15, 2015Location:Pasadena,
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Conference Name:Symposium: Freedom & Virtue: Re-Inventing Free Institutions in an Era of Globalization Conference Dates: August 6-9, 2015Submission Date: April 15, 2015Location:Pasadena, CaliforniaWebsite: http://www.jis3.org/symposium2015.htmFlyer: Freedom and Virtue

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News source: Events

Deepak Chopra and Joshua Knobe!

Deeprak Chopra interviews our own Joshua Knobe as part of his Curious Minds series. It's an interesting exchange! So, check it
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Deeprak Chopra interviews our own Joshua Knobe as part of his Curious Minds series. It's an interesting exchange!  So, check it out!

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

Post-bacc and Post-doc Bioethics Fellowships

Job List:  Americas Name of institution:  Bioethics Department, National Institutes of
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Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
Bioethics Department, National Institutes of Health
Town: 
Bethesda
Country: 
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

<strong>Machiavelli</strong> was brilliant, ruthless, cunning, clear-eyed, mercurial, a little boastful, and pathetic. But a comedian?

Machiavelli was brilliant, ruthless, cunning, clear-eyed, mercurial, a little boastful, and pathetic. But a
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Machiavelli was brilliant, ruthless, cunning, clear-eyed, mercurial, a little boastful, and pathetic. But a comedian?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily