Jacques Derrida

[Revised entry by Leonard Lawlor on March 19, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Jacques Derrida (1930-2004) was the founder of "deconstruction," a way of criticizing not only both
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[Revised entry by Leonard Lawlor on March 19, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Jacques Derrida (1930-2004) was the founder of "deconstruction," a way of criticizing not only both literary and philosophical texts but also political institutions. Although Derrida at times expressed regret concerning the fate of the word "deconstruction," its popularity indicates the wide-ranging influence of his thought, in philosophy, in literary...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Experimental Moral Philosophy

[New Entry by Mark Alfano and Don Loeb on March 19, 2014.] Experimental moral philosophy began to emerge as a methodology in the last decade of the twentieth century, a branch of the larger
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[New Entry by Mark Alfano and Don Loeb on March 19, 2014.] Experimental moral philosophy began to emerge as a methodology in the last decade of the twentieth century, a branch of the larger experimental philosophy (X-Phi, XP) approach. From the beginning, it has been embroiled in controversy on a number of fronts. Some...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Metaphysics of Causation

[Revised entry by Jonathan Schaffer on March 19, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] What must a world be like, to host causal relations? When the cue ball knocks the nine ball into the
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[Revised entry by Jonathan Schaffer on March 19, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] What must a world be like, to host causal relations? When the cue ball knocks the nine ball into the corner pocket, in virtue of what is this a case of causation?...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Analysis

[Revised entry by Michael Beaney on March 19, 2014. Changes to: Bibliography, bib2.html, bib3.html, bib4.html, bib6.html] Analysis has always been at the heart of philosophical method, but it has
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[Revised entry by Michael Beaney on March 19, 2014. Changes to: Bibliography, bib2.html, bib3.html, bib4.html, bib6.html] Analysis has always been at the heart of philosophical method, but it has been understood and practised in many different ways. Perhaps, in its broadest sense, it might be defined as a process of isolating or working back to what is more fundamental by means of which something, initially taken as given, can be explained or reconstructed. The explanation or reconstruction is often then exhibited in a...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Science before Socrates: Parmenides, Anaxagoras, and the New Astronomy

2014.03.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Daniel W. Graham, Science before Socrates: Parmenides, Anaxagoras, and the New Astronomy, Oxford University Press, 2013,
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2014.03.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Daniel W. Graham, Science before Socrates: Parmenides, Anaxagoras, and the New Astronomy, Oxford University Press, 2013, 287pp., $49.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780199959785. Reviewed by Jenny Bryan, University College London There seems to be something of a trend in current scholarship on the Presocratics, and on Parmenides in particular, to focus on the apparent value of their natural philosophy. In most cases, this translates into efforts to identify evidence of advances in scientific knowledge based on correct (or, at least, plausible) interpretation of empirical evidence. There is a commonly held desire to emphasise that (some of) the Presocratics were engaged in more than armchair speculation about first principles or the physical nature of the heavenly bodies. Rather, it is argued, these thinkers should be acknowledged not only as getting things right about, in particular, astronomy, but as having got. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Snob atheists

The arrogance of atheists. Outspoken skeptics of spirituality have claimed the intellectual high ground. Where does that leave everyone else?…
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The arrogance of atheists. Outspoken skeptics of spirituality have claimed the intellectual high ground. Where does that leave everyone else?… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Crisis of liberal belief

There are no liberal ideas, said Goethe, only liberal sentiments. They’re rooted not in fear, but in empathy. Can empathy inspire the masses?…
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There are no liberal ideas, said Goethe, only liberal sentiments. They’re rooted not in fear, but in empathy. Can empathy inspire the masses?… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Music criticism

Pick up a music magazine to learn about fashion, gossip, the food preferences and travel routines of pop stars. Don’t expect much discussion of, well, music…
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Pick up a music magazine to learn about fashion, gossip, the food preferences and travel routines of pop stars. Don’t expect much discussion of, well, music… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Derrida and the Inheritance of Democracy

2014.03.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Samir Haddad, Derrida and the Inheritance of Democracy, Indiana University Press, 2013, 178pp., $25.00 (pbk), ISBN
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2014.03.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Samir Haddad, Derrida and the Inheritance of Democracy, Indiana University Press, 2013, 178pp., $25.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780253008411. Reviewed by Matthias Fritsch, Concordia University As we may surmise from the many books and articles that have been published since his death in 2004, interest in Derrida's work appears unabated, at least in the English-speaking world. In addition, many seminars are still to be published, and quite a few texts have not yet been translated into English. However, the exact meaning of his arguments and interventions, while perhaps becoming clearer, have yet to be determined, and in fact in ways that seem to go beyond the usual situation of new interpretations of an author being presented. Perhaps this is not surprising, for Derrida has insisted on this indetermination as in fact a condition for taking up any legacy: a text that did not permit new, to some extent. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Blaise Pascal

[Revised entry by Desmond Clarke on March 18, 2014. Changes to: Bibliography] Pascal did not publish any philosophical works during his relatively brief lifetime. His status in French literature
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[Revised entry by Desmond Clarke on March 18, 2014. Changes to: Bibliography] Pascal did not publish any philosophical works during his relatively brief lifetime. His status in French literature today is based primarily on the posthumous publication of a notebook in which he drafted or recorded ideas for a planned defence of Christianity, the Pensees de M. Pascal sur la religion et sur quelques autres sujets (1670). Nonetheless, his philosophical commitments can be gleaned from...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy