Assistant Professor of Philosophy (Ethics)

Job List:  Americas Name of institution:  University of Oregon
Philosophy News image
Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
University of Oregon
Town: 
Eugene, Oregon
Country: 
USA
. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Making Objects and Events: A Hylomorphic Theory of Artifacts, Actions, and Organisms

2016.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Simon J. Evnine, Making Objects and Events: A Hylomorphic Theory of Artifacts, Actions, and Organisms, Oxford University Press,
Philosophy News image
2016.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Simon J. Evnine, Making Objects and Events: A Hylomorphic Theory of Artifacts, Actions, and Organisms, Oxford University Press, 2016, 268pp., $74.00 ( Reviewed by bk), ISBN 9780198779674. Lynne Rudder Baker, University of Massachusetts Amherst In the increasingly crowded field of the metaphysics of ordinary things, Simon J. Evnine has written a superb book. It is detailed, profound, and carefully argued, with extremely well-informed discussions of views that have a bearing on his own account. Evnine is careful to make clear the relevance of many different issues to each other. The book is impressive in scope. Evnine formulates a hylomorphic account of artifacts (including artworks), and adapts it to organisms and actions (artifactual events). He discusses natural non-organic objects (like rivers, stars, and rocks), which he takes not to be genuine objects, and develops a fictionalist account of discourse. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Simulation II: Escape

Musk and others have advanced the idea that we exist within a simulation, thus adding a new chapter to the classic problem of the external world. When philosophers engage this problem, the usual
Philosophy News image
Musk and others have advanced the idea that we exist within a simulation, thus adding a new chapter to the classic problem of the external world. When philosophers engage this problem, the usual goal is show how one can know that one’s experience correspond to an external reality. Musk takes a somewhat more practical approach: he and others are allegedly funding efforts to escape this simulation. In addition to the practical challenges of breaking out of a simulation, there are also some rather interesting philosophical concerns about whether such an escape is even possible. In regards to the escape, there are three main areas of interest. These are the nature of the simulation itself, the nature of the world outside the simulation and the nature of the inhabitants of the simulation. These three factors determine whether or not escape from the simulation is a possibility. Interestingly enough, determining the nature of the inhabitants involves addressing another classic philosophical. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Talking Philosophy

Etymology gleanings for October 2016

Mr. Madhukar Gogate, a retired engineer from India, has written me several times, and I want to comment on some of his observations. He notes that there is no interest in the reform in Great Britain
Philosophy News image
Spelling reform Mr. Madhukar Gogate, a retired engineer from India, has written me several times, and I want to comment on some of his observations. He notes that there is no interest in the reform in Great Britain and the United States. I have to agree. Nothing we are doing in this area seems to be of much practical use. The horse is dead, and I am almost sorry for beating the carcass. I stick to my opinion that the only way to arouse the public would be to recruit a few people whose voice will be heard everywhere and at once. A letter signed by two Nobel Prize winners (let us say, Toni Morrison and Bob Dylan) or a song by Bob Dylan (rhymed, as in, for instance: “I keep yellin’! Something should be done about spellin’,” or unrhymed) would do more good than all our impotent meetings and blogs.  Those few people who know something about the history of Spelling Reform remember only that G. B. Shaw was its avid advocate. And that’s how it should be: Shaw was world famous. Should I accost. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

Complaining has become an art form, a way of life, and, for the <strong>Tate Modern</strong>, a bizarre and misguided strategy for "community engagement"&nbsp;

Complaining has become an art form, a way of life, and, for the Tate Modern, a bizarre and misguided strategy for &quot;community
Philosophy News image
Complaining has become an art form, a way of life, and, for the Tate Modern, a bizarre and misguided strategy for "community engagement" 

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Dating</strong> is like a &ldquo;precarious form of contemporary labor: an unpaid internship," says Moira Weigel. "If you look sharp, you might get a free lunch&rdquo;

Dating is like a &amp;ldquo;precarious form of contemporary labor: an unpaid internship,&quot; says Moira Weigel. &quot;If you look sharp, you might get a free
Philosophy News image
Dating is like a “precarious form of contemporary labor: an unpaid internship," says Moira Weigel. "If you look sharp, you might get a free lunch”

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Bards thought writing would destroy our memories; scribes loathed the printing press. Now <strong>handwriting enthusiasts</strong> have taken up this tradition of snobbery

Bards thought writing would destroy our memories; scribes loathed the printing press. Now handwriting enthusiasts have taken up this tradition of
Philosophy News image
Bards thought writing would destroy our memories; scribes loathed the printing press. Now handwriting enthusiasts have taken up this tradition of snobbery

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Wondrous Truths: The Improbable Triumph of Modern Science

2016.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews J.D. Trout, Wondrous Truths: The Improbable Triumph of Modern Science, Oxford University Press, 2016, 241pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN
Philosophy News image
2016.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews J.D. Trout, Wondrous Truths: The Improbable Triumph of Modern Science, Oxford University Press, 2016, 241pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780199385072. Reviewed by Mark Newman, Rhodes College The principal idea of this short but entertaining popular book is that the standard narrative about how science arose across Europe, the one that tells us progress in scientific discovery during the seventeenth century was the result of the inevitable march of scientific method, is incorrect. Rather than being the result of sustained and diligent application of method, successful science is a consequence of hitting upon correct theories through a mixture of accident, luck, geography, and personal idiosyncrasy. Trout makes this rather dramatic claim because he sees a problem with scientific method's single common rule of inference, inference to the best explanation (IBE). The problem is that this rule is subject to evaluative. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Ancient Rome was gripped by a mania for public displays of reading. Wealthy Romans felt the need to <strong>boast of their intellect</strong> to the world. Some things never change

Ancient Rome was gripped by a mania for public displays of reading. Wealthy Romans felt the need to boast of their intellect to the world. Some things never
Philosophy News image
Ancient Rome was gripped by a mania for public displays of reading. Wealthy Romans felt the need to boast of their intellect to the world. Some things never change

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Two <strong>pillars of physics</strong> &ndash; general relativity and quantum mechanics -- have been borne out in countless experiments. But they contradict each other

Two pillars of physics &amp;ndash; general relativity and quantum mechanics -- have been borne out in countless experiments. But they contradict each
Philosophy News image
Two pillars of physics – general relativity and quantum mechanics -- have been borne out in countless experiments. But they contradict each other

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily