Phenomenal Qualities: Sense, Perception, and Consciousness

2016.07.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Paul Coates and Sam Coleman (eds.), Phenomenal Qualities: Sense, Perception, and Consciousness, Oxford University Press, 2015,
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2016.07.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Paul Coates and Sam Coleman (eds.), Phenomenal Qualities: Sense, Perception, and Consciousness, Oxford University Press, 2015, 435pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198712718. Reviewed by Brian Cutter, University of Notre Dame Phenomenal qualities can be understood, roughly and intuitively, as the qualities associated with a conscious state that constitute "what it's like" to be in that state. Many of the enduring questions in philosophy of mind are about phenomenal qualities. For example, one dimension of the mind-body problem is the problem of integrating phenomenal qualities into the picture of reality presented by the physical sciences. Phenomenal qualities also take center stage in the philosophy of perception. Are sensory colors objective properties of external surfaces, or properties of inner states or sense data that we erroneously project onto external objects? Must a sensory quality be instantiated. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Whether his strange blend of fact and fiction elicits delight, astonishment, or boredom -- or all three -- give <strong>Geoff Dyer</strong> his due: He's an original

Whether his strange blend of fact and fiction elicits delight, astonishment, or boredom -- or all three -- give Geoff Dyer his due: He&#39;s an
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Whether his strange blend of fact and fiction elicits delight, astonishment, or boredom -- or all three -- give Geoff Dyer his due: He's an original

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

You can&rsquo;t weigh, record, or export it. You can&rsquo;t eat it, collect it, or give it away. But in a noisy world, <strong>silence sells.</strong> Just ask Finland

You can&amp;rsquo;t weigh, record, or export it. You can&amp;rsquo;t eat it, collect it, or give it away. But in a noisy world, silence sells. Just ask
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You can’t weigh, record, or export it. You can’t eat it, collect it, or give it away. But in a noisy world, silence sells. Just ask Finland

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Authenticity as Self-Transcendence: The Enduring Insights of Bernard Lonergan

2016.07.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael H. McCarthy, Authenticity as Self-Transcendence: The Enduring Insights of Bernard Lonergan, University of Notre Dame
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2016.07.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael H. McCarthy, Authenticity as Self-Transcendence: The Enduring Insights of Bernard Lonergan, University of Notre Dame Press, 2015, 435pp., $49.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780268035372. Reviewed by Patrick H. Byrne, Boston College Michael H. McCarthy offers a new and very important interpretation of the life work of Bernard Lonergan. He presents Lonergan as he understood himself: a man who saw a deep and profound crisis as few did and who was called to respond to that crisis as few could. McCarthy describes his book as "four new essays" which expand upon the argument of his The Crisis of Philosophy.[1] This time he has widened his focus from a crisis in philosophy to a cultural crisis. McCarthy draws upon his extensive reading of Lonergan's works to show how Lonergan came to understand the nature of this broader cultural crisis. He also draws upon the work of many others, most notably Charles Taylor and Hannah. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>Clive James </strong>is not a Proust scholar, but he is a Proust appreciator &mdash;&nbsp;an enthusiast, not an expert. The distinction is what matters

Clive James is not a Proust scholar, but he is a Proust appreciator &amp;mdash;&amp;nbsp;an enthusiast, not an expert. The distinction is what
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Clive James is not a Proust scholar, but he is a Proust appreciator — an enthusiast, not an expert. The distinction is what matters

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Why God would not send his sons to Oxford: parenting and the problem of evil

Imagine a London merchant deliberating whether to send his ten sons to Oxford or to Cambridge. Leafing through the flyers, he learns that, if he sends the boys to Cambridge, they will make
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Imagine a London merchant deliberating whether to send his ten sons to Oxford or to Cambridge. Leafing through the flyers, he learns that, if he sends the boys to Cambridge, they will make “considerable progress in the sciences as well as in virtue, so that their merit will elevate them to honourable occupations for the rest of their lives” — on the other hand, if he sends them to Oxford, “they will become depraved, they will become rascals, and they will pass from  mischief to mischief until the law will have to set them in order, and condemn them to various punishments.” Never doubting the truth of these predictions, he still decides to send the lads to Oxford, and not to Cambridge. “Is it not clear, according to our common notions, that 1) this merchant wants his sons to be wicked and miserable; and 2) that, consequently, he is acting in a way that is contrary to goodness and to the love of virtue?” This is not an excerpt from a Cambridge undergraduate prospectus. It is a version. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Is it possible to experience time passing?

Suppose you had to explain to someone, who did not already know, what it means to say that time passes. What might you say? Perhaps you would explain that different times are arranged in an ordered
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Suppose you had to explain to someone, who did not already know, what it means to say that time passes. What might you say? Perhaps you would explain that different times are arranged in an ordered series with a direction: Monday precedes Tuesday, Tuesday precedes Wednesday, and so on. But if time passes and space does not, then this cannot be the whole story. After all, locations in space are also ordered: London is to the north of Paris, Paris is to the north of Marseille, and so on. And even if space had an intrinsic direction, this would not make it the case that space passed. A direction only requires that there be an asymmetry; but a mere asymmetry would not explain the notion of passing. Instead, you might appeal to experience. We experience time passing throughout our lives, or so it is claimed. Different people will give different accounts of the details. Some will emphasise the fact that experienced change, such as motion, has a dynamic quality that is absent from any. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Death is unavoidable and suffering is everywhere, says <strong>Julian Baggini.</strong> The only debate should be about the nature and extent of our participation. So let's talk about eating meat

Death is unavoidable and suffering is everywhere, says Julian Baggini. The only debate should be about the nature and extent of our participation. So let&#39;s talk about eating
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Death is unavoidable and suffering is everywhere, says Julian Baggini. The only debate should be about the nature and extent of our participation. So let's talk about eating meat

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Clive James </strong>is not a Proust scholar, but he is a Proust appreciator -- an enthusiast, not an expert. The distinction is what matters

Clive James is not a Proust scholar, but he is a Proust appreciator -- an enthusiast, not an expert. The distinction is what
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Clive James is not a Proust scholar, but he is a Proust appreciator -- an enthusiast, not an expert. The distinction is what matters

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Wasps&nbsp;are a threat, often putting us at risk of a sting. But <strong>wasps lead exemplary lives</strong>, and they're responsible for a great shift in cultural history

Wasps&amp;nbsp;are a threat, often putting us at risk of a sting. But wasps lead exemplary lives, and they&#39;re responsible for a great shift in cultural
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Wasps are a threat, often putting us at risk of a sting. But wasps lead exemplary lives, and they're responsible for a great shift in cultural history

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily