Question about Religion - Stephen Maitzen responds

Isn't evil prove that God exist ? 1. Evil exists. 2. Evil is a departure from the way things ought to be. 3. If there is a departure from the way things ought to be, then there is a way things
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Isn't evil prove that God exist ? 1. Evil exists. 2. Evil is a departure from the way things ought to be. 3. If there is a departure from the way things ought to be, then there is a way things ought to be. 4. Therefore, there is a way things ought to be. 5. If there is a way things ought to be, then there is a design plan for things. 6. If there is a design plan for things, then there must be a Designer. 7. Therefore, there must be a Designer. If the universe is the product of chance as opposed to intelligence, then there is no design or purpose built into the universe. Since one can rationally apply a standard of goodness to an object only if that object was designed with the purpose of meeting that standard, isn't evil which itself is a deviation from that standard of goodness prove that God exist? Response from: Stephen Maitzen Thanks for the interesting argument. I'd challenge premise (5) for starters. Not all normative truths require a designer or decree-giver. Consider. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

[Revised entry by Jan Faye on July 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] As the theory of the atom, quantum mechanics is perhaps the most successful theory in the history of science. It
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[Revised entry by Jan Faye on July 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] As the theory of the atom, quantum mechanics is perhaps the most successful theory in the history of science. It enables physicists, chemists, and technicians to calculate and predict the outcome of a vast number of experiments and to create new and advanced technology based on the insight into the behavior of atomic objects. But it is also a theory that challenges our imagination. It seems to violate...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Question about Art - Jonathan Westphal responds

Can you name an attribute such that all the paintings which have this attribute are good paintings? Response from: Jonathan Westphal You might think that translucency is a good thing in a
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Can you name an attribute such that all the paintings which have this attribute are good paintings? Response from: Jonathan Westphal You might think that translucency is a good thing in a watercolor, but not in gouache. Versimilitude might be good in a portrait, but not in an expressionist landscape. And so on. On the other hand there is a logical (or with a stretch a "metaphysical") attribute that all good paintings have. They meet the criteria for excellence in paintings of that type. Helen Knight on the use of "good" in aesthetic connections is brilliant on this subject.

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Question about Time - Allen Stairs responds

I've read that as we go faster time dilates and so time slows down. So my question is that If suppose a person in a spacecraft accelerates to the speed of light. After sometime (in his prospective)
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I've read that as we go faster time dilates and so time slows down. So my question is that If suppose a person in a spacecraft accelerates to the speed of light. After sometime (in his prospective) he decides to decelerate finally to much much lower than the speed of light. Then during all of this how much time will have passed for everything outside? Will he be able to decelerate at all? I mean for an outside observer, who by some means, is able to see everything that is happening in the spaceship, will the person be frozen (in time) and therefore not able to push the button that decelerates the ship and ultimately travel infinitely in time and space? (again another assumption that the fuel does not run out). And (in the prospective of the space traveler) after pushing the button where will he be in time with respect to the observer? I hope I am able to convey my problem. Thanks in advance. Response from: Allen Stairs A good question. The nub of the matter is this: if something. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Do children with a religious background have difficulties distinguishing fiction from reality?

Here I will analyze a recent paper by Kathleen Corriveau et al., published in Cognitive Science that has been heralded as evidence that “Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty
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Here I will analyze a recent paper by Kathleen Corriveau et al., published in Cognitive Science that has been heralded as evidence that “Children Exposed To Religion Have Difficulty Distinguishing Fact From Fiction.” First, I will look at what the researchers say the study says, then look at what the media claims the study finds,…

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News source: The Prosblogion

Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents

2014.07.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dominic Gregory, Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents, Oxford University
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2014.07.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dominic Gregory, Showing, Sensing, and Seeming: Distinctively Sensory Representations and Their Contents, Oxford University Press, 2013, 230pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199653737. Reviewed by Angela Mendelovici, University of Western Ontario In this book, Dominic Gregory's aim is to provide a theory of the contents of distinctively sensory representations. The introduction and Chapters 1-4 provide the basic theory, while Chapters 5-8 discuss applications. This review focuses on the theory. Gregory's target is distinctively sensory representations (DSRs), which are representations that, as he puts it, show things as looking, sounding, or, more generally, "sensorily standing" a certain way. What it is to sensorily stand a certain way is best introduced with the help of examples. A visual mental image of a table shows the table as looking brown and shiny, but it does not, all on its own, show the complete. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Ghosts in Sunlight

An artist’s memory is a dangerous, necessary thing. To turn experience into art, to make something out of remembering, is like “watching ghosts in sunlight”…
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An artist’s memory is a dangerous, necessary thing. To turn experience into art, to make something out of remembering, is like “watching ghosts in sunlight”… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Decline of Harper Lee

Harper Lee – 88, in a wheelchair, forgetful, largely deaf and blind – remains where she’s been for decades: trapped by the Mockingbird industrial complex…
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Harper Lee – 88, in a wheelchair, forgetful, largely deaf and blind – remains where she’s been for decades: trapped by the Mockingbird industrial complex… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Between Perception and Action

2014.07.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Bence Nanay, Between Perception and Action, Oxford University Press, 2013, 209pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199695379.
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2014.07.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Bence Nanay, Between Perception and Action, Oxford University Press, 2013, 209pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199695379. Reviewed by Nicoletta Orlandi, University of California, Santa Cruz When I tie my shoelaces I perform an action. Bence Nanay's primary aim is deintellectualizing what is involved in the production of human actions of this kind. According to him, the vast majority of our actions are like the actions of infants and non-human animals in being performed under the guidance of perceptual states. Nanay calls the perceptual states that precede actions 'pragmatic representations'. Pragmatic representations are the cognitive components of the immediate mental antecedents of action, and they represent action properties -- properties, such as the size of an object relative to my grip size -- that are relevant for the performance of an action (p. 39). Most of our actions are not performed under the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Morality and Evolutionary Biology

[Revised entry by William FitzPatrick on July 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, natural-teleology-ethics.html, notes.html] A recent article in The Economist - sporting the provocative
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[Revised entry by William FitzPatrick on July 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, natural-teleology-ethics.html, notes.html] A recent article in The Economist - sporting the provocative subtitle "Biology Invades a Field Philosophers Thought was Safely Theirs" - begins with the following rumination:...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy