<strong>Elizabeth Bishop</strong> had astonishing control and poetic technique. But below the surface was a gushing emotional register. Was she the loneliest person who ever lived?

Elizabeth Bishop had astonishing control and poetic technique. But below the surface was a gushing emotional register. Was she the loneliest person who ever
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Elizabeth Bishop had astonishing control and poetic technique. But below the surface was a gushing emotional register. Was she the loneliest person who ever lived?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

&ldquo;<strong>O Niebuhr, Where Art Thou?</strong>&rdquo; He died along with the literate public's interest in theology. Now Christian thought is in a long retreat. It doesn&rsquo;t have to be that way

&amp;ldquo;O Niebuhr, Where Art Thou?&amp;rdquo; He died along with the literate public&#39;s interest in theology. Now Christian thought is in a long retreat. It doesn&amp;rsquo;t have to be that
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“O Niebuhr, Where Art Thou?” He died along with the literate public's interest in theology. Now Christian thought is in a long retreat. It doesn’t have to be that way

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Unequivocal Justice

2017.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Freiman, Unequivocal Justice, Routledge, 2017, 157 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138628229. Reviewed by Andrew I.
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2017.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Freiman, Unequivocal Justice, Routledge, 2017, 157 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138628229. Reviewed by Andrew I. Cohen, Georgia State University John Rawls famously defends two principles of justice as those to which free and equal persons would agree. These principles apply to the basic structure of society. The basic structure includes the norms and institutions determining fundamental "rights, liberties, and opportunities" that any person needs, regardless of her particular aims.[1] In his engaging and provocative book, Christopher Freiman argues that Rawlsians often wrongly dismiss free market systems as vehicles for realizing justice. Rawlsians are guilty of a "self-obviating idealization" (11): they assume an injustice makes robust redistributive states necessary, but ignore how that injustice perverts state institutions. Though Freiman might not convince many Rawlsians, he poses an. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Poor George Orwell. The bare-knuckled revolutionary has been reduced to a cuddly, bipartisan grandpa. <strong>Orwell&rsquo;s deradicalization</strong> has a long and shameless history

Poor George Orwell. The bare-knuckled revolutionary has been reduced to a cuddly, bipartisan grandpa. Orwell&amp;rsquo;s deradicalization has a long and shameless
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Poor George Orwell. The bare-knuckled revolutionary has been reduced to a cuddly, bipartisan grandpa. Orwell’s deradicalization has a long and shameless history

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The past should be studied only to expose its failings. Or so goes liberal logic. How <strong>disparaging the past</strong> become a mark of intellectual respectability

The past should be studied only to expose its failings. Or so goes liberal logic. How disparaging the past become a mark of intellectual
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The past should be studied only to expose its failings. Or so goes liberal logic. How disparaging the past become a mark of intellectual respectability

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn</strong> was a political writer. But to see life solely in political terms, he believed, is to misunderstand it. The meaning of life lies elsewhere

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was a political writer. But to see life solely in political terms, he believed, is to misunderstand it. The meaning of life lies
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Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was a political writer. But to see life solely in political terms, he believed, is to misunderstand it. The meaning of life lies elsewhere

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Age of Responsibility

2017.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Yascha Mounk, The Age of Responsibility, Harvard University Press, 2017, 280 pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674545465. Reviewed
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2017.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Yascha Mounk, The Age of Responsibility, Harvard University Press, 2017, 280 pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674545465. Reviewed by Scott Anderson, University of British Columbia This is an impressive, frequently charming, and partly successful attempt to illuminate the way a distinctive understanding of “personal responsibility” — one which might be described as “responsibility as accountability” — has taken on an increasingly large and problematic role in Western politics and political thought over the last 50 years or so. It seems aimed to appeal well beyond the philosophical community, with hopes of motivating a thoughtful and concerned readership to revamp the way our conception of “personal responsibility”[1 functions in political and social life. The book employs a fair amount of extant philosophical work to provoke a change in our public discourse and practices, while also performing some creative. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Many of <strong>Alexander Calder</strong>'s greatest works have their genesis in children&rsquo;s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for play<strong><br /></strong>

Many of Alexander Calder&#39;s greatest works have their genesis in children&amp;rsquo;s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for
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Many of Alexander Calder's greatest works have their genesis in children’s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for play

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Mathematics and Its Applications, A Transcendental-Idealist Perspective

2017.10.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jairo Jos&#233; da Silva, Mathematics and Its Applications, A Transcendental-Idealist Perspective, Springer, 2017, 275pp., $99.00
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2017.10.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jairo José da Silva, Mathematics and Its Applications, A Transcendental-Idealist Perspective, Springer, 2017, 275pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9783319630724. Reviewed by Mirja Hartimo, University of Jyväskylä, Finland Jairo José da Silva formulates a transcendental-idealist approach to mathematics. Appropriating (he is explicit about not engaging in any kind of exegesis) some central notions of Husserl's phenomenology, da Silva holds that mathematics is "intentionally posited" in the mathematical community, in communal work that has been carried out for centuries. "Intentional acts," such as intuiting or empty intending, put something with characteristic features and properties in front of the subject (28). If such positing is consistent, the intended object comes into existence (29). This allows viewing the existence of formal objects "on their own terms," as intentionally posited by the mathematicians. This. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

After a decade of hype, the <strong>digital humanities</strong> has merely confirmed what should have been obvious all along: More information is not more knowledge

After a decade of hype, the digital humanities has merely confirmed what should have been obvious all along: More information is not more
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After a decade of hype, the digital humanities has merely confirmed what should have been obvious all along: More information is not more knowledge

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily