<strong>Read the acknowledgments</strong>. Amid the dreary enumeration &mdash; librarians, fact-checkers, mothers, therapists, divorce lawyers &mdash; truths seep out

Read the acknowledgments. Amid the dreary enumeration &amp;mdash; librarians, fact-checkers, mothers, therapists, divorce lawyers &amp;mdash; truths seep
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Read the acknowledgments. Amid the dreary enumeration — librarians, fact-checkers, mothers, therapists, divorce lawyers — truths seep out

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Kantian Foundation of Schopenhauer's Pessimism

2017.12.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dennis Vanden Auweele, The Kantian Foundation of Schopenhauer&#39;s Pessimism, Routledge, 2017, 242pp., $149.95 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.12.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Dennis Vanden Auweele, The Kantian Foundation of Schopenhauer's Pessimism, Routledge, 2017, 242pp., $149.95 (hbk), ISBN 9781138744271. Reviewed by Robert Wicks, The University of Auckland The title of Dennis Vanden Auweele's book raises one's curiosity. As it tells us that Schopenhauer's pessimism has a Kantian foundation, it intimates that Kant's philosophy itself contains a pessimistic strand. This is unexpected, since pessimism does not appear to be a particularly Kantian quality. Kant's moral theory upholds the belief in individual freedom, the immortality of the soul, and the existence of an all-good, all-knowing, all-powerful God who serves to coordinate happiness with virtue in an ideal end-state. The book reminds us, though, that a pessimistic aspect of Kant resides in a position he maintained in the later part of his career -- one reminiscent of the Christian doctrine of original sin -- that rooted. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Religious Experience

[Revised entry by Mark Webb on December 13, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Religious experiences can be characterized generally as experiences that seem to the person having them to be
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[Revised entry by Mark Webb on December 13, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Religious experiences can be characterized generally as experiences that seem to the person having them to be of some objective reality and to have some religious import. That reality can be an individual, a state of affairs, a fact, or even an absence, depending on the religious tradition the experience is a part of. A wide variety of kinds of experience fall under the general rubric of religious experience. The concept is vague, and the multiplicity of kinds of experiences that fall under it makes it difficult to capture in any general account. Part...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Jerry Fodor</strong> was a skeptic, including in his own ideas about how cognition works. He was treated as a crank &mdash; a beloved crank

Jerry Fodor was a skeptic, including in his own ideas about how cognition works. He was treated as a crank &amp;mdash; a beloved
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Jerry Fodor was a skeptic, including in his own ideas about how cognition works. He was treated as a crank — a beloved crank

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Patrick Leigh Fermor</strong> began walking in 1933. Until his death, in 2011, he was all generosity and enthusiasm, arcane knowledge and irresistible wit

Patrick Leigh Fermor began walking in 1933. Until his death, in 2011, he was all generosity and enthusiasm, arcane knowledge and irresistible
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Patrick Leigh Fermor began walking in 1933. Until his death, in 2011, he was all generosity and enthusiasm, arcane knowledge and irresistible wit

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

When <strong>French theorists</strong> invaded Baltimore. Drinks flowed, insults were hurled, Derrida triumphed, and Lacan ran up a up a $900 phone bill

When French theorists invaded Baltimore. Drinks flowed, insults were hurled, Derrida triumphed, and Lacan ran up a up a $900 phone
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When French theorists invaded Baltimore. Drinks flowed, insults were hurled, Derrida triumphed, and Lacan ran up a up a $900 phone bill

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Herder: Philosophy and Anthropology

2017.12.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Anik Waldow and Nigel deSouza (eds.), Herder: Philosophy and Anthropology, Oxford University Press, 2017, 266 pp., $75.00, ISBN
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2017.12.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Anik Waldow and Nigel deSouza (eds.), Herder: Philosophy and Anthropology, Oxford University Press, 2017, 266 pp., $75.00, ISBN 9780198779650. Reviewed by Rachel Zuckert, Northwestern University This collection of essays on Herder's philosophical-anthropological thought is arranged in two parts: "Towards a New Philosophy: Philosophy as Anthropology," including pieces by Charles Taylor, Marion Heinz, Nigel DeSouza, Stefanie Buchenau, Stephen Gaukroger, and Dalia Nassar, and "The Human Animal: Nature, Language, History, Culture," including essays by John Zammito, Anik Waldow, Kristin Gjesdal, Johannes Schmidt, Martin Bollacher, Michael Forster, and Frederick Beiser. As the part titles and the title of the volume suggest, many of the essays treat Herder's philosophical methodology as well as his characteristic subject matters. Herder himself argues that philosophy should focus on the human being or (in his. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>Goethe</strong> was an uninhibited pagan who boasted of his "pretty wild life" and knowledge of girls. Yet biographers suggest he didn't have sex until he was nearly 40. What gives?

Goethe was an uninhibited pagan who boasted of his &quot;pretty wild life&quot; and knowledge of girls. Yet biographers suggest he didn&#39;t have sex until he was nearly 40. What
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Goethe was an uninhibited pagan who boasted of his "pretty wild life" and knowledge of girls. Yet biographers suggest he didn't have sex until he was nearly 40. What gives?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Ethics of Climate Engineering: Solar Radiation Management and Non-Ideal Justice

2017.12.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Toby Svoboda, The Ethics of Climate Engineering: Solar Radiation Management and Non-Ideal Justice, Routledge, 2017, 176pp.,
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2017.12.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Toby Svoboda, The Ethics of Climate Engineering: Solar Radiation Management and Non-Ideal Justice, Routledge, 2017, 176pp., $140.00, ISBN 9781138204836. Reviewed by Corey Katz, The Ohio State University Solar radiation management (SRM) names a suite of large-scale, intentional climate engineering techniques whose purpose is to reflect a small proportion of incoming solar radiation back into space. This leads to less solar energy entering or remaining in the atmosphere, which in turn leads to a decrease in global average temperature. Much attention has focused, for example, on the possibility of emitting reflective sulfate aerosols into the atmosphere that would artificially cool the planet. While the technology is still in the research stage, SRM has the potential to both relatively quickly and comparatively cheaply lessen or halt global warming. This has made its deployment both attractive and. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Pseudoscience, by definition, should not appear in scientific publications. But peer review is a porous gatekeeper, and &ldquo;<strong>predatory publishers</strong>&rdquo; are shameless

Pseudoscience, by definition, should not appear in scientific publications. But peer review is a porous gatekeeper, and &amp;ldquo;predatory publishers&amp;rdquo; are
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Pseudoscience, by definition, should not appear in scientific publications. But peer review is a porous gatekeeper, and “predatory publishers” are shameless

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily