Disorientation and Moral Life

2017.10.06 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ami Harbin, Disorientation and Moral Life, Oxford University Press, 2016, 256pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190277406. Reviewed
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2017.10.06 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ami Harbin, Disorientation and Moral Life, Oxford University Press, 2016, 256pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190277406. Reviewed by Elise Springer, Wesleyan University How is moral life is affected by major practical disorientations -- by profound experiences of feeling at a loss for how to go on with one's life? Many moral theorists will treat major disorientations the way Aristotle treats shame: in the context of a moral life, disorientation is a defect, since the affected person cannot serve as a consistent moral exemplar. Ami Harbin defends a contrary view: disorientation can be appreciated in morally positive ways. Disorientation is not defined precisely here; instead, the book highlights family resemblances among phenomena such as grief, migration, double-consciousness, queerness, profound illness and trauma. These are each treated with compassion, and often with psychological detail. A different author. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Northwest Philosophy Conference

Event Name: The Northwest Philosophy Conference Event Dates: October 5-7, 2017 Submission Deadline: September 1, 2017 Location: Pullman, WA Website: https://pppa.wsu.edu/ Flyer: Call
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Event Name: The Northwest Philosophy Conference Event Dates: October 5-7, 2017 Submission Deadline: September 1, 2017 Location: Pullman, WA Website: https://pppa.wsu.edu/ Flyer: Call For Papers

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News source: Events

One Hundred Years that Shook the World: Failures, Legacies, and Futures of the Russian Revolution

Conference Name: One Hundred Years that Shook the World: Failures, Legacies, and Futures of the Russian Revolution Conference Dates: October 5-7, 2017 Location: St. Gallen,
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Conference Name: One Hundred Years that Shook the World: Failures, Legacies, and Futures of the Russian Revolution Conference Dates: October 5-7, 2017 Location: St. Gallen, Switzerland Website: http://www.unisg.ch/revolution2017 Flyer:  Centennials.pdf

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News source: Events

The Perfectionist Turn: From Metanorms to Metaethics

2017.10.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Douglas J. Den Uyl and Douglas B. Rasmussen, The Perfectionist Turn: From Metanorms to Metaethics, Edinburgh University Press,
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2017.10.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Douglas J. Den Uyl and Douglas B. Rasmussen, The Perfectionist Turn: From Metanorms to Metaethics, Edinburgh University Press, 2016, 346 pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474413343. Reviewed by Justin Tosi, Georgetown University Philosophers who defend perfectionist accounts of the human good and then go on to develop political theories tend to favor political institutions that promote that view of the good. In other words, political philosophers tend to be perfectionists all the way down, or not at all. Douglas Den Uyl and Douglas Rasmussen are an exception to this rule. In an earlier work, they argued for a neo-Aristotelian perfectionist foundation for political liberalism.[1] Here they develop in greater detail the ethical doctrine of "individualistic perfectionism" that serves as the basis of their political theory. Den Uyl and Rasmussen cast ethical theorizing as proceeding from a choice between two. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<em>Leaves of Grass</em> did not come to <strong>Walt Whitman</strong> gradually. It flowed from an epiphany. The evidence: a dozen pages he stuffed into a silly novel

Leaves of Grass did not come to Walt Whitman gradually. It flowed from an epiphany. The evidence: a dozen pages he stuffed into a silly
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Leaves of Grass did not come to Walt Whitman gradually. It flowed from an epiphany. The evidence: a dozen pages he stuffed into a silly novel

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

&ldquo;As a child,&rdquo; wrote <strong>Roland Barthes</strong>, &ldquo;I was bored often ... and it has continued my whole life.&rdquo; His boredom was powerful: the intensity of a lack of intensity

&amp;ldquo;As a child,&amp;rdquo; wrote Roland Barthes, &amp;ldquo;I was bored often ... and it has continued my whole life.&amp;rdquo; His boredom was powerful: the intensity of a lack of
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“As a child,” wrote Roland Barthes, “I was bored often ... and it has continued my whole life.” His boredom was powerful: the intensity of a lack of intensity

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Jeremy Bentham's head</strong> "smells like vinegar and feet and bad jerky and damp dust." Might that help to explain the roots of utilitarian desires?

Jeremy Bentham&#39;s head &quot;smells like vinegar and feet and bad jerky and damp dust.&quot; Might that help to explain the roots of utilitarian
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Jeremy Bentham's head "smells like vinegar and feet and bad jerky and damp dust." Might that help to explain the roots of utilitarian desires?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

A Naïve Realist Theory of Colour

2017.10.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Keith Allen, A Na&#239;ve Realist Theory of Colour, Oxford University Press, 2016, 204 pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198755364.
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2017.10.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Keith Allen, A Naïve Realist Theory of Colour, Oxford University Press, 2016, 204 pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198755364. Reviewed by Hagit Benbaji, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev The title of Keith Allen's fascinating book succinctly describes its content. The theory is realist because it holds that colors are mind-independent properties of physical objects. The theory is naïve because it holds that colors are distinct from any property identified by science. And it is a theory: notwithstanding any association with the adjective 'naïve,' this is the most systematic and developed account of colors as qualitative properties to date. Beyond the title, we are acquainted with qualitative properties through experience, so that the naïve realist theory of colors is coupled with a naïve realist theory of perception, in order to account for the autonomy of the manifest image. Yet, the manifest image does not. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Patriotism & Football

Embed from Getty Images After President Trump tweeted his way into the matter, the question of patriotism and protest became a hot issue in the public eye once again. A reasonable way to begin the
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Embed from Getty Images After President Trump tweeted his way into the matter, the question of patriotism and protest became a hot issue in the public eye once again. A reasonable way to begin the discussion is to consider the nature of patriotism, which has been said to be the “last refuge of the scoundrel.” One caricature of patriotism consists of shallow flag waving, the uncritical obedience to the dictates of the ruling class and the exaltation of popular prejudices.  Unfortunately, this caricature is often the reality and is, unsurprisingly, what is often pushed by the ruling classes upon the masses. This is, of course, not the only viable account of patriotism. One alternative approach is to go with the easy and obvious definition—patriotism is the love of one’s country. This simple definition leads to the philosophically complicated question of the nature of love. One way to look at love, at least a positive form of love, is that it involves a devotion to the higher principles,. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

How wonderful to hear <strong>Beethoven&rsquo;s Fifth</strong> at its 1808 premiere: 50 mediocre musicians playing on weak instruments in an unheated concert hall conducted by a deaf man after one rehearsal

How wonderful to hear Beethoven&amp;rsquo;s Fifth at its 1808 premiere: 50 mediocre musicians playing on weak instruments in an unheated concert hall conducted by a deaf man after one
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How wonderful to hear Beethoven’s Fifth at its 1808 premiere: 50 mediocre musicians playing on weak instruments in an unheated concert hall conducted by a deaf man after one rehearsal

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily