The Equal Society: Essays in Theory and Practice

2017.05.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews George Hull (ed.), The Equal Society: Essays in Theory and Practice, Rowman and Littlefield, 2015, 354pp., $100.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.05.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews George Hull (ed.), The Equal Society: Essays in Theory and Practice, Rowman and Littlefield, 2015, 354pp., $100.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781498515719. Reviewed by Valentin Beck, Freie Universität Berlin What would be the central characteristics of a society in which its citizens are truly treated as equals? While egalitarian thinkers are united in their affirmation of the value of equality, they notoriously have -- for centuries -- disagreed about its interpretation. Egalitarianism now is a dominant current within Western moral and political philosophy, but it is also very broad and multifaceted. There is a wide range of mutually inconsistent egalitarian conceptions, ranging from libertarian and meritocratic positions to social liberal, communitarian and socialist ones. Therefore, the decisive question is not whether one should be an egalitarian, but what kind of egalitarian one should be, and how to interpret the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Susan Stebbing

[New Entry by Michael Beaney and Siobhan Chapman on May 8, 2017.] Susan Stebbing was a leading figure in British philosophy between the First and Second World Wars. She made significant
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[New Entry by Michael Beaney and Siobhan Chapman on May 8, 2017.] Susan Stebbing was a leading figure in British philosophy between the First and Second World Wars. She made significant contributions to the development of the analytic tradition, both in establishing it institutionally and in showing how its ideas and techniques could be applied in a wide range of domains. Her early work focused on logic and during her lifetime she was celebrated chiefly for A Modern Introduction to Logic (1930), which offered an account of both traditional, Aristotelian logic and the new mathematical logic...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Modern Origins of Modal Logic

[Revised entry by Roberta Ballarin on May 8, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Modal logic can be viewed broadly as the logic of different sorts of modalities, or modes of truth: alethic
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[Revised entry by Roberta Ballarin on May 8, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Modal logic can be viewed broadly as the logic of different sorts of modalities, or modes of truth: alethic ("necessarily"), epistemic ("it is known that"), deontic ("it ought to be the case that"), or temporal ("it has been the case that") among others. Common logical features of these operators justify the common label. In the strict sense however, the term "modal logic" is reserved for the logic of the alethic modalities, as opposed for example to temporal or deontic logic. From...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Shakespeare</strong> receives a disproportionate amount of attention. He's unavoidable. But his dominance serves a purpose: It keeps the literary ecosystem functioning

Shakespeare receives a disproportionate amount of attention. He&#39;s unavoidable. But his dominance serves a purpose: It keeps the literary ecosystem
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Shakespeare receives a disproportionate amount of attention. He's unavoidable. But his dominance serves a purpose: It keeps the literary ecosystem functioning

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Satan's emissary, cunning fox, cold-blooded destroyer: That's the conventional view of <strong>Machiavelli</strong>. But was his advice in <em>The Prince</em> really meant to be followed?

Satan&#39;s emissary, cunning fox, cold-blooded destroyer: That&#39;s the conventional view of Machiavelli. But was his advice in The Prince really meant to be
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Satan's emissary, cunning fox, cold-blooded destroyer: That's the conventional view of Machiavelli. But was his advice in The Prince really meant to be followed?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

With the exception of Jesus Christ, more books have been written about <strong>Martin Luther</strong> than about any other person. What can a new biography add? Quite a lot, actually

With the exception of Jesus Christ, more books have been written about Martin Luther than about any other person. What can a new biography add? Quite a lot,
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With the exception of Jesus Christ, more books have been written about Martin Luther than about any other person. What can a new biography add? Quite a lot, actually

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Shakespeare</strong> receives a disproportionate amount of attention. Cultural debates are Shakespeare-shaped. He's unavoidable. But his dominance serves a purpose: It keeps the literary ecosystem functioning

Shakespeare receives a disproportionate amount of attention. Cultural debates are Shakespeare-shaped. He&#39;s unavoidable. But his dominance serves a purpose: It keeps the literary ecosystem
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Shakespeare receives a disproportionate amount of attention. Cultural debates are Shakespeare-shaped. He's unavoidable. But his dominance serves a purpose: It keeps the literary ecosystem functioning

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Philosophy of the Mozi: The First Consequentialists

2017.05.07 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Chris Fraser, The Philosophy of the Mozi: The First Consequentialists, Columbia University Press, 2016, 293pp., $40.00 (pbk),
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2017.05.07 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Chris Fraser, The Philosophy of the Mozi: The First Consequentialists, Columbia University Press, 2016, 293pp., $40.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780231149273. Reviewed by Eirik Lang Harris, City University of Hong Kong When I was a graduate student casting around for ideas for a dissertation topic, one of my mentors suggested that I find some topic X, generally denigrated in the literature, and formulate an argument of the sort, "X is not as stupid as it sounds." In an important sense, this is what Chris Fraser has done in examining the early Chinese text the Mozi. He examines the philosophical ideas of the Mohists as they appear in this text and provides not only the most charitable account of their philosophical ideas to appear in any Western language but also the first book length treatment of this text by a philosopher in at least 50 years. Fraser's goal is to contribute to "the philosophical 'rehabilitation'... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Philosopher of the month: Simone de Beauvoir [timeline]

This May, the OUP Philosophy team honors Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986) as their Philosopher of the Month. A French existentialist philosopher, novelist, and feminist theoretician, Beauvoir’s essays
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This May, the OUP Philosophy team honors Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986) as their Philosopher of the Month. A French existentialist philosopher, novelist, and feminist theoretician, Beauvoir’s essays on ethics and politics engage with questions about freedom and responsibility in human existence. She is perhaps best known for Le deuxième sexe (The Second Sex), a groundbreaking examination of the female condition through an existentialist lens and a key text to the Second Wave feminist movement of the 1960s and 70s. Even among her critics, Beauvoir is widely considered the most significant influence on feminist theory and politics during the course of the twentieth century. Simone de Beauvoir earned her degree from the Sorbonne at a time when higher education was just becoming accessible to French women. When she was twenty‐one, she became the ninth woman to obtain the prestigious agrégation from the École Normale Supérieur, the youngest  ever to do so in philosophy. There, Beauvoir met. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

<strong>Edgar Allan Poe</strong> is known&nbsp;for his supernatural horror and detective stories. But in his final major work, <em>Eureka</em>, he turned to cosmology &mdash; and was uncannily prescient

Edgar Allan Poe is known&amp;nbsp;for his supernatural horror and detective stories. But in his final major work, Eureka, he turned to cosmology &amp;mdash; and was uncannily
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Edgar Allan Poe is known for his supernatural horror and detective stories. But in his final major work, Eureka, he turned to cosmology — and was uncannily prescient

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily