Those mean-spirited New York Intellectuals. &ldquo;Everyone around <em>Partisan Review</em>,&rdquo; wrote <strong>Diana Trilling,</strong> &ldquo;had his licensed malice.&rdquo; But she could be as vicious as any of them

Those mean-spirited New York Intellectuals. &amp;ldquo;Everyone around Partisan Review,&amp;rdquo; wrote Diana Trilling, &amp;ldquo;had his licensed malice.&amp;rdquo; But she could be as vicious as any of
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Those mean-spirited New York Intellectuals. “Everyone around Partisan Review,” wrote Diana Trilling, “had his licensed malice.” But she could be as vicious as any of them

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Quick: Think of a novel devoted to <strong>climate change</strong>. Tough, right? What explains this failure of imagination involving the fate of the world?

Quick: Think of a novel devoted to climate change. Tough, right? What explains this failure of imagination involving the fate of the
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Quick: Think of a novel devoted to climate change. Tough, right? What explains this failure of imagination involving the fate of the world?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What it&rsquo;s like to be known as the man defeated by a machine: <strong>Garry Kasparov</strong>, an early enthusiast of chess-playing computers, rethinks Deep Blue

What it&amp;rsquo;s like to be known as the man defeated by a machine: Garry Kasparov, an early enthusiast of chess-playing computers, rethinks Deep
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What it’s like to be known as the man defeated by a machine: Garry Kasparov, an early enthusiast of chess-playing computers, rethinks Deep Blue

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Many of the statues, reliefs, and sarcophagi of the ancient world were colorfully painted. And yet the association of beauty with <strong>pristine whiteness</strong> continues. Why?

Many of the statues, reliefs, and sarcophagi of the ancient world were colorfully painted. And yet the association of beauty with pristine whiteness continues.
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Many of the statues, reliefs, and sarcophagi of the ancient world were colorfully painted. And yet the association of beauty with pristine whiteness continues. Why?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Free Speech & Feeling Unsafe

Embed from Getty Images //embed.gettyimages.com/embed/692674924?et=D9NBD6naTsxvF9u6STm4HA&amp;#38;tld=com&amp;#38;viewMoreLink=off&amp;#38;sig=tqBJtL-5vRsFeqLkxDSPa3vHvxnCo4vUdGw9onSBlNA= A somewhat recent
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Embed from Getty Images //embed.gettyimages.com/embed/692674924?et=D9NBD6naTsxvF9u6STm4HA&tld=com&viewMoreLink=off&sig=tqBJtL-5vRsFeqLkxDSPa3vHvxnCo4vUdGw9onSBlNA= A somewhat recent talking point on the right is that “the liberals” are trying to violate the free speech rights of conservatives. On the one hand, this is a hasty generalization: the left counts among its numbers some of the staunchest advocates of free expression who defend the right of conservatives to engage in free expression. On the other hand, there are those on the left who are actively trying to silence conservative voices. That said, is important to distinguish between attempts to silence people and legitimate acts of protest. To illustrate, the incident involving Charles Murray at Middlebury College illustrates how some people try to unjustly silence those they disagree with. In contrast, the students at Notre Dame who walked out on Vice President Pence’s speech were engaged in a legitimate. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

August Wilhelm von Schlegel

[Revised entry by Katia D. Hay on June 9, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] August W. Schlegel (Sept. 5, 1767, Hanover - May 12, 1845, Bonn) was a German essayist, critic, translator,
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[Revised entry by Katia D. Hay on June 9, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] August W. Schlegel (Sept. 5, 1767, Hanover - May 12, 1845, Bonn) was a German essayist, critic, translator, philosopher, and poet. Although the philosophical dimension and profundity of his writings remain underrated, he is considered to be one of the founders of the German Romantic Movement - which he conceived of as a European movement - as well as one of the most prominent disseminators of its philosophical foundational ideas, not only in Germany but also abroad and, most notably, in Britain....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

In the end, it's been said, authors write for professors. But the scholarly fate of <strong>Thoreau</strong> is uncertain; the 7,000 pages of his journal still await full study. It is the great untold secret of American letters

In the end, it&#39;s been said, authors write for professors. But the scholarly fate of Thoreau is uncertain; the 7,000 pages of his journal still await full study. It is the great untold secret of
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In the end, it's been said, authors write for professors. But the scholarly fate of Thoreau is uncertain; the 7,000 pages of his journal still await full study. It is the great untold secret of American letters

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Those mean-spirited New York Intellectuals. &ldquo;Everyone around <em>Partisan Review</em>,&rdquo; wrote <strong>Dianne Trilling,</strong> &ldquo;had his licensed malice.&rdquo; But she could be as vicious as any of them

Those mean-spirited New York Intellectuals. &amp;ldquo;Everyone around Partisan Review,&amp;rdquo; wrote Dianne Trilling, &amp;ldquo;had his licensed malice.&amp;rdquo; But she could be as vicious as any of
Philosophy News image
Those mean-spirited New York Intellectuals. “Everyone around Partisan Review,” wrote Dianne Trilling, “had his licensed malice.” But she could be as vicious as any of them

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Cyril Connolly</strong> was obsessed with his own worst traits: laziness, nostalgia, gluttony, hypochondria, frivolity. His fetish for failure was, oddly, a source of inspiration.

Cyril Connolly was obsessed with his own worst traits: laziness, nostalgia, gluttony, hypochondria, frivolity. His fetish for failure was, oddly, a source of
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Cyril Connolly was obsessed with his own worst traits: laziness, nostalgia, gluttony, hypochondria, frivolity. His fetish for failure was, oddly, a source of inspiration.

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Continuants: Their Activity, Their Being, and Their Identity

2017.06.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Wiggins, Continuants: Their Activity, Their Being, and Their Identity, Oxford University Press, 2016, 239pp., $50.00 (hbk),
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2017.06.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Wiggins, Continuants: Their Activity, Their Being, and Their Identity, Oxford University Press, 2016, 239pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198716624. Reviewed by Harold Noonan, University of Nottingham This book of twelve essays is a selection of David Wiggins's writings from the last four and a half decades on the topics of substance and identity. The earliest is from 1968 and the last from 2016. They are deliberately not substantially rewritten so that readers can appreciate Wiggins's progress. However, as Wiggins puts it, he has pursued a policy of local repair and improvement, to do justice to the Aristotelian insight from which he once began. The book also contains a very useful bibliography of Wiggins's writings between 1964 and 2016. The revision and additions take different forms for the different essays: straightforward revision, additional critical commentary, new material, abbreviation and. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News