A democracy with an exceptionalist heritage is unprepared to respond wisely when arrogance takes over. That's the lesson of <strong>Athens and Plato</strong>: Greatness has to be earned again and again

A democracy with an exceptionalist heritage is unprepared to respond wisely when arrogance takes over. That&#39;s the lesson of Athens and Plato: Greatness has to be earned again and
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A democracy with an exceptionalist heritage is unprepared to respond wisely when arrogance takes over. That's the lesson of Athens and Plato: Greatness has to be earned again and again

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

When failure to get the story was the story. The trope pervaded the New Journalism. Now <strong>Joan Didion</strong> shares her journalistic defeat: the South

When failure to get the story was the story. The trope pervaded the New Journalism. Now Joan Didion shares her journalistic defeat: the
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When failure to get the story was the story. The trope pervaded the New Journalism. Now Joan Didion shares her journalistic defeat: the South

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform

2017.03.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Tommie Shelby, Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform, Harvard University Press, 2016, 340pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.03.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Tommie Shelby, Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform, Harvard University Press, 2016, 340pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674970502. Reviewed by Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., Vanderbilt University Tommie Shelby turns his attention to metropolitan neighborhoods throughout the United States of America, composed mostly of black people (hence "dark" ghettos), that are characterized by high rates of concentrated poverty, violence, racial segregation, street crime, joblessness, family instability, welfare receipt, drug abuse, teenage pregnancy, and school dropouts. It is in virtue of such features that these neighborhoods are stigmatized as "ghettos" (p. 1). The stigma is imposed on the residents, as well. Shelby's concern: how best to think philosophically about these neighborhoods and residents, not with regard to how best to ameliorate their unfairly conditioned lives, but to how it is that such life-affecting. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>The life of a literary liar</strong>. Clifford Irving is that rare fabulist who is openly grandiose about his determination to put one over on his audience

The life of a literary liar. Clifford Irving is that rare fabulist who is openly grandiose about his determination to put one over on his
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The life of a literary liar. Clifford Irving is that rare fabulist who is openly grandiose about his determination to put one over on his audience

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Heidegger's Path to Language

2017.03.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Wanda Torres Gregory, Heidegger&#39;s Path to Language, Lexington, 2016, 148pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781498527026. Reviewed by
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2017.03.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Wanda Torres Gregory, Heidegger's Path to Language, Lexington, 2016, 148pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781498527026. Reviewed by Joe Balay, Christopher Newport University From his early work to his late pathways, Heidegger's central question of Being is intimately tied to the question of language through which and within which Being is disclosed. For this reason, Wanda Torres Gregory proposes that to grapple with Heidegger's notion of Being it is inevitable that we should confront the question of language. The significance of this critical confrontation is made all the more exigent, however, when one observes that "Heidegger himself calls us to this task when he speaks to the importance of language in the development of his thought" (xvii). As has been noted by other scholars, this intimacy between Being and language in Heidegger's work presents certain critical challenges. First and foremost is Heidegger's. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Juan Luis Vives [Joannes Ludovicus Vives]

[Revised entry by Lorenzo Casini on March 14, 2017. Changes to: Bibliography] Juan Luis Vives (1493 - 1540) was a Spanish humanist and educational theorist who strongly opposed scholasticism and
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[Revised entry by Lorenzo Casini on March 14, 2017. Changes to: Bibliography] Juan Luis Vives (1493 - 1540) was a Spanish humanist and educational theorist who strongly opposed scholasticism and made his mark as one of the most influential advocates of humanistic learning in the early sixteenth century. His works are not limited to education but deal with a wide range of subjects including philosophy, psychology, politics, social reform and religion. Vives was not a systematic writer, which makes it difficult to classify him as a philosopher. His thought is eclectic and pragmatic, as well as...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Women of letters

During the Enlightenment era, the term &quot;man of letters&quot; (deriving from the French term belletrist) was used to distinguish true scholars—independent thinkers who relished debate, conversation and
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During the Enlightenment era, the term “man of letters” (deriving from the French term belletrist) was used to distinguish true scholars—independent thinkers who relished debate, conversation and learning. In an age when literacy was a distinct form of cultural capital, it served to identify the literati, often the French members of the “Republic of Letters,” who met in “salons” designed for the elevation, education, and cultural sophistication of the participants. One explicit assumption is made in this phrase however, that the participants are male. This Women’s History Month, we are delving into the lives and letters of two eighteenth-century women who broke through these assumptions, arguing for women’s education, intellectual respect, and cultural participation. Hester Lynch Piozzi and Elizabeth Montagu were two true “women of letters,” both esteemed and appreciated in their own right as culturally refined cognoscente.. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

<strong>Survival of the buzziest</strong>. In our clickbait culture, critics are dying off. But popularity is not a substitute for value, or so we keep telling ourselves

Survival of the buzziest. In our clickbait culture, critics are dying off. But popularity is not a substitute for value, or so we keep telling
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Survival of the buzziest. In our clickbait culture, critics are dying off. But popularity is not a substitute for value, or so we keep telling ourselves

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Karl Miller</strong> was an editor at <em>The Spectator</em> and the <em>New Statesman</em>, and co-founded the <em>London Review of Books</em>. He was pugnacious, wise, and, not least, a good father

Karl Miller was an editor at The Spectator and the New Statesman, and co-founded the London Review of Books. He was pugnacious, wise, and, not least, a good
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Karl Miller was an editor at The Spectator and the New Statesman, and co-founded the London Review of Books. He was pugnacious, wise, and, not least, a good father

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Not just neurons</strong>. Materialism, our most celebrated way of understanding the mind, on closer examination looks woefully inadequate

Not just neurons. Materialism, our most celebrated way of understanding the mind, on closer examination looks woefully
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Not just neurons. Materialism, our most celebrated way of understanding the mind, on closer examination looks woefully inadequate

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily