Camus, Philosophe: To Return to Our Beginnings

2016.02.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew Sharpe, Camus, Philosophe: To Return to Our Beginnings, Brill, 2015, 446pp., $194.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789004302334.
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2016.02.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew Sharpe, Camus, Philosophe: To Return to Our Beginnings, Brill, 2015, 446pp., $194.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789004302334. Reviewed by David Stegall, Clemson University Matthew Sharpe begins with the celebratory confession that "Camus' voice has been so much a part of my inner life, like many millions of others', that I don't know where my own sensibilities begin that were not taken from what I took to be his." (xiii) Sharpe situates his text within the ongoing Camus renaissance, a renaissance that Sharpe traces to four causes: The publication in 1994 of Camus' Le Premier Homme, a true literary event; the fall of Stalinism; the war on terror; and the decline of the hegemony of post-modernism and post-structuralism with academia. And so while Camus had never declined in popularity as a writer, Camus as philosopher and as resource for philosophical inquiry has been on the rise since the 1990s.... Read. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Forty-five years after publishing his first book, <strong>Giorgio Agamben</strong> continues to inspire condemnation, misunderstanding, frustration &mdash; and praise

Forty-five years after publishing his first book, Giorgio Agamben continues to inspire condemnation, misunderstanding, frustration &amp;mdash; and
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Forty-five years after publishing his first book, Giorgio Agamben continues to inspire condemnation, misunderstanding, frustration — and praise

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Robert Lowell in love</strong>. He was a depressive, philandering alcoholic who treated women terribly. Yet he saw them as intellectual equals

Robert Lowell in love. He was a depressive, philandering alcoholic who treated women terribly. Yet he saw them as intellectual
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Robert Lowell in love. He was a depressive, philandering alcoholic who treated women terribly. Yet he saw them as intellectual equals

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Recovering Integrity: Moral Thought in American Pragmatism

2016.02.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stuart Rosenbaum, Recovering Integrity: Moral Thought in American Pragmatism, Lexington Books, 2015, 169pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.02.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stuart Rosenbaum, Recovering Integrity: Moral Thought in American Pragmatism, Lexington Books, 2015, 169pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781498510202. Reviewed by G. Scott Davis, University of Richmond Stuart Rosenbaum sets out to complete Alasdair MacIntyre's project of demolishing contemporary Anglo-American moral theory, concluding that, pace MacIntyre, we need neither Nietzsche nor Aristotle, but rather William James and John Dewey. For Rosenbaum, the European entry into the western hemisphere demanded the recognition of competing ways of life that could not be swept away. While the book as a whole is uneven, I think Rosenbaum makes a powerful case for a distinctively pragmatic moral perspective that provides a natural fit for the sort of pluralist, democratic, social world many of us associate with America at her best. That he neglects the potential for moral thought in "America's greatest Pragmatist" simply. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Philosopher of the month: Plato

The OUP Philosophy team have selected Plato (c. 429–c.347 BC) as their February Philosopher of the Month. The best known and most widely studied of all the ancient Greek philosophers, Plato laid the
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The OUP Philosophy team have selected Plato (c. 429 BC–c. 347 BC) as their February Philosopher of the Month. The best known and most widely studied of all the ancient Greek philosophers, Plato laid the groundwork for Western philosophy and Christian theology. Plato was most likely born in Athens, to Ariston and Perictione, a noble, politically active family. Coming of age during the Peloponnesian War, Plato was educated by the ancient world’s most renowned thinkers, including Cratylus, Pythagoras, and Socrates. From c.407 BC he was a disciple of Socrates, from whom he may have derived many of his ideas about ethics. When Socrates was sentenced to death in 399 BC—as depicted in Plato’s Phaedo—Plato grew discouraged with political life and traveled to Italy, Sicily, and possibly Egypt, before returning to Athens around 387 BC where he remained for most of the rest of his life. Shortly after his return, Plato founded the Academy of Athens—an open-air educational center generally. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Opposite Day: "Charity begins at home" edition

It&#39;s been almost a decade since my evil twin Ricardo last posted on this blog. I invite him back today to share a horribly misguided speech that he recently gave as part of a debate in St Andrews
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It's been almost a decade since my evil twin Ricardo last posted on this blog. I invite him back today to share a horribly misguided speech that he recently gave as part of a debate in St Andrews on the topic 'Charity begins at home'. (They needed someone to defend that awful claim, and I wasn't entirely comfortable about it myself, so sent along my evil twin to do the job. Here's what he came up with...)Charity begins at home… but that’s not to say it ends there!So let me begin by clarifying what is and is not at stake in this debate.  It’s common ground that we should do more to help others (and the global poor in particular). Our core thesis is just that we should not focus exclusively on the global poor, neglecting significant needs closer to home.To establish this thesis, consider the following scenario: Upon learning that the Against Malaria Foundation can save a life for around £2000, you go to the bank and withdraw £4000, intending to save two lives with it.  But. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

Regretoric: the rise of the “nonapology” apology and the “apology tour”

OxfordDictionaries.com is adding the nouns apology tour and nonapology. These additions represent two related steps in the evolution of the noun apology, which first entered English in the sixteenth
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OxfordDictionaries.com is adding the nouns apology tour and nonapology. These additions represent two related steps in the evolution of the noun apology, which first entered English in the sixteenth century, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. Its earliest example is a book title: the 1533 Apologie of Syr Thomas More. That was More’s book defending the old Catholic order and his own actions and the word then referred to a verbal defense (as in Plato’s “The Apology of Socrates”). By the early 1600s, the noun had yielded the verb apologize and over time, the meaning of apology and apologize shifted further to indicate a statement of regret rather than a defense of one’s actions. An intermediate step along the way was the use of apology to mean an excuse, and that use lasted quite some time. President George Washington, for example, used apologize this way in a 1789 letter to the Sultan of Morocco. Referring to the lateness of his correspondence, Washington wrote, somewhat. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

Are you really free? Yes: a new argument for freedom

How is human freedom really possible in the natural world as correctly described by modern physics, chemistry, biology, and cognitive neuroscience? Or, given the truth of modern science, are you
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How is human freedom really possible in the natural world as correctly described by modern physics, chemistry, biology, and cognitive neuroscience? Or, given the truth of modern science, are you really free? By ‘real freedom,’ I mean ‘real free will and real rational agency,’ which in turn means: First, you really can choose and do what you want to, or refrain from so choosing or doing, thus without being in any way compelled or prevented by irresistible inner or outer forces (real free will). Second, you really can self-consciously choose and do what you want to, for reasons, and with real moral responsibility (real rational agency). By ‘real moral responsibility’ for X, I mean: First, X is something you really chose or did, whose objective moral value flows from and directly attaches to your really free choice or action. And second, real moral responsibility requires real freedom—if you weren’t free to choose or do X, you couldn’t be responsible. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Proust was among the first to recognize that the <strong>shock of air travel</strong> wasn&rsquo;t technological but intellectual: a new way of processing the world, a new habit of mind

Proust was among the first to recognize that the shock of air travel wasn&amp;rsquo;t technological but intellectual: a new way of processing the world, a new habit of
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Proust was among the first to recognize that the shock of air travel wasn’t technological but intellectual: a new way of processing the world, a new habit of mind

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>To understand modernism,</strong> pay less attention to poems and paintings than to faceless bureaucrats, agency acronyms, and legalese

To understand modernism, pay less attention to poems and paintings than to faceless bureaucrats, agency acronyms, and
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To understand modernism, pay less attention to poems and paintings than to faceless bureaucrats, agency acronyms, and legalese

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily