Widowed, Patrick Bront&euml; sought a new wife with remarkable crassness and egotism. What, if anything, did his <strong>literary daughters </strong>learn from him?

Widowed, Patrick Bront&amp;euml; sought a new wife with remarkable crassness and egotism. What, if anything, did his literary daughters learn from
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Widowed, Patrick Brontë sought a new wife with remarkable crassness and egotism. What, if anything, did his literary daughters learn from him?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Cervantes&rsquo;s career</strong> as a soldier ended in injury, not glory. But rather than cynical, he became ambivalent, as his characters showed

Cervantes&amp;rsquo;s career as a soldier ended in injury, not glory. But rather than cynical, he became ambivalent, as his characters
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Cervantes’s career as a soldier ended in injury, not glory. But rather than cynical, he became ambivalent, as his characters showed

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Inexplicable, almost unthinkable acts of violence; audacious, nihilistic, adolescent self-righteousness: <strong>Looking for ISIS in a 1907 novel</strong>

Inexplicable, almost unthinkable acts of violence; audacious, nihilistic, adolescent self-righteousness: Looking for ISIS in a 1907
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Inexplicable, almost unthinkable acts of violence; audacious, nihilistic, adolescent self-righteousness: Looking for ISIS in a 1907 novel

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Comparative Philosophy without Borders

2016.07.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Arindam Chakrabarti and Ralph Weber (eds.), Comparative Philosophy without Borders, Bloomsbury, 2016, 246pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.07.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Arindam Chakrabarti and Ralph Weber (eds.), Comparative Philosophy without Borders, Bloomsbury, 2016, 246pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781472576255. Reviewed by Saranindranath Tagore, National University of Singapore In their Introduction and Afterword, Arindam Chakrabarti and Ralph Weber present a position according to which the idea of comparative philosophy motivates a compelling meta-thesis. In the closing pages of their masterfully articulated afterword, the idea is communicated through a quotation from Gayatri Spivak: Perhaps it may be said that our lesson of learning equivalence, practicing equivalence, indexing a small epistemic change or shift, may come to facilitate a world where comparison in extremis will no longer be required. (pp.237-238). Spivak's point is that once epistemic equivalence is achieved across the regions of comparison the ladder of comparative philosophy can be removed. In other. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>Tim Parks</strong> disdains the conventions of book talk and the posturings of the literary establishment. He ridicules everyone but himself

Tim Parks disdains the conventions of book talk and the posturings of the literary establishment. He ridicules everyone but
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Tim Parks disdains the conventions of book talk and the posturings of the literary establishment. He ridicules everyone but himself

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Politics & Plagiarism

During the 2016 Republican National Convention Melania Trump delivered a speech that plagiarized the speech given by Michelle Obama at the Democratic National Convention in 2008. As always, the
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During the 2016 Republican National Convention Melania Trump delivered a speech that plagiarized the speech given by Michelle Obama at the Democratic National Convention in 2008. As always, the responses tended to correspond with ideology: the left largely condemned and mocked it; some on the right downplayed and even defended it. As a professor and an author, I condemn plagiarism and have a few students fail themselves each year by doing what Melania’s speechwriter did. I do not fail students; I merely record their failure. After my initial mild condemnation of the plagiarism, I came to what is an obvious realization: almost all political speeches are acts of plagiarism. I am not claiming that the vast majority of speechwriters are stealing the words and ideas of others; the plagiarism is of a different sort and this will be clear with a bit of explanation. Put a bit roughly, plagiarism occurs when someone tries to claim that substantial words and ideas are their own when they. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Etymology gleanings for July 2016

As I have observed in the past, the best way for me to make sure that I have an audience is to say something deemed prejudicial or wrong. Then one or more readers will break their silence, and I’ll
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Feedback As I have observed in the past, the best way for me to make sure that I have an audience is to say something deemed prejudicial or wrong. Then one or more readers will break their silence, and I’ll get the recognition I deserve (that is, my comeuppance). My thanks to those who notice my errors and typos! But occasionally I can partly vindicate myself. For instance, there was a comment from a Dutch speaker about the odd glosses with which I supplied Dutch klamp and klomp. He is of course right. I should have made it clear that I borrowed my material from English etymological dictionaries, even though I, naturally, compared the information in them with what I found in the great dictionary of Middle Dutch. Since what follows cannot interest those who don’t know Dutch, I’ll leave the glosses from the great Middle Dutch dictionary without translation.  CLAMPE (CLAMP, CLEMPE): 1) haak, kram, klamp; 2) hoop, schelf, stapel, (hoi)rook; CLOMPE (CLOMP): klomp, klont, kluit, blok. I am. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

<strong>Rousseau was a hypocrite</strong> for our times. He preached family values but exposed himself to women and was given to compulsive masturbation, though he warned against it in his writings

Rousseau was a hypocrite for our times. He preached family values but exposed himself to women and was given to compulsive masturbation, though he warned against it in his
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Rousseau was a hypocrite for our times. He preached family values but exposed himself to women and was given to compulsive masturbation, though he warned against it in his writings

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Tim Parks</strong> disdain the conventions of book talk and the posturings of the literary establishment. He ridicules everyone but himself

Tim Parks disdain the conventions of book talk and the posturings of the literary establishment. He ridicules everyone but
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Tim Parks disdain the conventions of book talk and the posturings of the literary establishment. He ridicules everyone but himself

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

New ideas are necessary engines of progress. Most aren't new, however, but result from what Steven Poole calls the looping "<strong>evolution of ideas</strong>"

New ideas are necessary engines of progress. Most aren&#39;t new, however, but result from what Steven Poole calls the looping &quot;evolution of
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New ideas are necessary engines of progress. Most aren't new, however, but result from what Steven Poole calls the looping "evolution of ideas"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily