Why We Need Ordinary Language Philosophy

2015.01.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sandra Laugier, Why We Need Ordinary Language Philosophy, Daniela Ginsburg (tr.), University of Chicago Press, 2013, 147pp.,
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2015.01.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sandra Laugier, Why We Need Ordinary Language Philosophy, Daniela Ginsburg (tr.), University of Chicago Press, 2013, 147pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226470542. Reviewed by Julia Tanney, University of Kent Originally published by Vrin in 2000 under the title Du réel à l'ordinaire: Quelle philosophie du langage aujourd'hui?, this timely English translation joins a welcome list of recent attempts to insist that the neglected insights of Austin, Wittgenstein, and other so-called 'ordinary language philosophers' have a rightful place in the current debate among philosophers of the 'analytic' or 'Anglo-Saxon' tradition. Sandra Laugier covers a wealth of authors, focusing in the end on what can be elicited from the practice of ordinary language philosophy. But what to my mind is particularly special about Laugier's approach (upon which this review will focus) is that she begins with Quine -- the erstwhile. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Ukulele

From emasculated, irrelevant kitsch to YouTube sensation: The ukulele has its long-overdue moment. Chunk-a-chunk!…
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From emasculated, irrelevant kitsch to YouTube sensation: The ukulele has its long-overdue moment. Chunk-a-chunk!… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

On Tony Judt

Tony Judt made his name exposing the mendacious follies of public intellectuals. Then he became one…
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Tony Judt made his name exposing the mendacious follies of public intellectuals. Then he became one… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Islamism and the Left

Michael Walzer detects much anxiety on the left, where fear of being called Islamophobic seems greater than fear of Islamist zealotry…
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Michael Walzer detects much anxiety on the left, where fear of being called Islamophobic seems greater than fear of Islamist zealotry… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Heidegger's Way of Being

2015.01.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard Capobianco, Heidegger's Way of Being, University of Toronto Press, 2014, 122pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781442649637.
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2015.01.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard Capobianco, Heidegger's Way of Being, University of Toronto Press, 2014, 122pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781442649637. Reviewed by S. Montgomery Ewegen, Trinity College This book presents an eloquent and compelling case that Heidegger's life-long philosophical task, from his earliest texts to his latest, was the elucidation and articulation of Being understood as manifestation. To demonstrate that this is so, Richard Capobianco analyses various texts ranging from 1919 to 1976 (many of which have yet to be translated into English) in which Heidegger's preoccupation with Being's manifestation, rather than with the human being's meaning-making activity, is made clear. Despite the many different names that Heidegger employed to articulate such manifestation -- physis, aletheia, Logos, hen, Ereignis, Lichthung, Gegend, Es Gibt -- Capobianco capably demonstrates that each of these terms more or less 'says the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

What is the Worst Thing You Should (Be Allowed to) Say?

The murders at Charlie Hedbo and their aftermath raised the issue of freedom of expression in a dramatic and terrible manner. In response to these deaths, there was an outpouring of support for this
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Members of Westboro Baptist Church have been specifically banned from entering Canada for hate speech. Church members enter Canada, aiming to picket bus victim’s funeral (Photo credit: Wikipedia) The murders at Charlie Hedbo and their aftermath raised the issue of freedom of expression in a dramatic and terrible manner. In response to these deaths, there was an outpouring of support for this basic freedom and, somewhat ironically, a crackdown on some people expressing their views. This situation raises two rather important issues. The first is the matter of determining the worst thing that a person should express. The second is the matter of determining the worst thing that a person should be allowed to express. While these might seem to be the same issue, they are not. The reason for this is that there is a distinction between what a person should do and what is morally permissible to prevent a person from doing. The main focus will be on using the coercive power of the state. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Environmental Aesthetics

[Revised entry by Allen Carlson on January 26, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Environmental aesthetics is a relatively new sub-field of philosophical aesthetics. It arose within
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[Revised entry by Allen Carlson on January 26, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Environmental aesthetics is a relatively new sub-field of philosophical aesthetics. It arose within analytic aesthetics in the last third of the twentieth century. Prior to its emergence, aesthetics within the analytic tradition was largely concerned with philosophy of art. Environmental aesthetics originated as a reaction to this emphasis, pursuing instead the investigation of the aesthetic appreciation of natural environments. Since its early stages, the scope...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Discrimination & Disadvantage

While Kevin Timpe and I were trying to hold off on going public with the new blog we're putting together, the cat has already been let out of the bag (see here). So, we figured we might as well go
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While Kevin Timpe and I were trying to hold off on going public with the new blog we're putting together, the cat has already been let out of the bag (see here). So, we figured we might as well go ahead and start formally spreading the word about Discrimination and Disadvantage. Here is a brief statement concerning our goals and motivations:In recent years, philosophers have increasingly reflected on how various kinds of privilege and advantage are at work in the profession with an eye towards improving the lot of the disadvantaged. This blog is a space for philosophical reflection on various kinds of disadvantage (e.g., discrimination based on racism, classism, sexism, hetero-sexism, ableism, and the intersectionality of these and related phenomena) as well as discussion of such disadvantage within the philosophical community.The impetus behind the blog begain with a simple question posted by Kevin on Facebook concerning the perceived need for a group blog or FB page for discussing. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

PHILOS 15 Call for paper

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  GLEVO
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
GLEVO
Town: 
Enna
Country: 
Italy

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Nifty Tricks

I like nifty tricks that I can use in data exploration and analysis. Here is one that I just came across today: Daniel Lakens used a simulation to illustrate why you should always report Welch's
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I like nifty tricks that I can use in data exploration and analysis. Here is one that I just came across today:Daniel Lakens used a simulation to illustrate why you should always report Welch's t-test, which does not assume equal variance, and not Student's t-test -- even when using a two-step procedure that involves Levene's test. It's a simple trick, and it actually makes things simpler, and hey, you're doing the statistically right thing!Here is another one I came across a while back:Chris Said argued that bar graphs with error bars, for all their faults, can be useful for eyeballing comparison of means. However, instead of using the standard 95% confidence interval for means, the eyeballing trick involves using 83.4% CI for the error bars. Now, there are more limitations to this trick, but it's still useful.So, those are the two nifty tricks that I learned recently. What are yours?

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News source: Experimental Philosophy