Novels and gay sex

How much gay sex should a novel have? If the writer happens to be gay and is at all ambitious, he will have a complicated answer. Caleb Crain explains…
Philosophy News image
How much gay sex should a novel have? If the writer happens to be gay and is at all ambitious, he will have a complicated answer. Caleb Crain explains… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

On Hugh Trevor-Roper

Hugh Trevor-Roper’s trajectory – once eminent, then discredited – echoes the oldest of morality tales. Yet in death, his reputation has been revived…
Philosophy News image
Hugh Trevor-Roper’s trajectory – once eminent, then discredited – echoes the oldest of morality tales. Yet in death, his reputation has been revived… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Curator Hitler

Hitler took aesthetic concerns seriously – all too seriously. But look closely: There are places where you might agree with him…
Philosophy News image
Hitler took aesthetic concerns seriously – all too seriously. But look closely: There are places where you might agree with him… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Just Property: A History in the Latin West, Volume One: Wealth, Virtue, and the Law

2014.04.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Pierson, Just Property: A History in the Latin West, Volume One: Wealth, Virtue, and the Law, Oxford University
Philosophy News image
2014.04.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Pierson, Just Property: A History in the Latin West, Volume One: Wealth, Virtue, and the Law, Oxford University Press, 2013, 287pp. $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199673285. Reviewed by William A. Edmundson, Georgia State University This is the first volume of a proposed two-volume work. It is an intellectual narrative that begins with Plato's Republic and concludes with Locke's Second Treatise of Government. The focus is private property in the intuitive sense of tangible things that one person (or persons) may exclude others from occupying, using, or possessing. Thus, intangible property and property in persons -- including self-ownership -- are outside the book's scope. But the book is not only about property and its incidents but also, as the subtitle indicates, about the unequal distribution of property among persons and the bearing of unequal material holdings on the. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Idea of Hegel's Science of Logic

2014.04.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stanley Rosen, The Idea of Hegel's Science of Logic, University of Chicago Press, 2014, 509pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN
Philosophy News image
2014.04.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stanley Rosen, The Idea of Hegel's Science of Logic, University of Chicago Press, 2014, 509pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226065885. Reviewed by Robert M. Wallace, Independent Scholar I believe that Stanley Rosen's new book combines comprehensive exegesis and philosophical penetration more successfully than any other study so far published on Hegel'sScience of Logic (SL). No one who is seriously interested in Hegel can afford to neglect Rosen's book. I will outline the book's major theses and accomplishments and conclude with a couple of significant criticisms. Hegel's Science of Logic (1812-16) is less widely discussed than his first major work, the Phenomenology of Spirit (PS) (1807). The PS combines an intricate argument with dramatic discussions of master and bondsman, Sophocles's Antigone, and the Terror in the French Revolution. The Science of. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Theories of Meaning

[Revised entry by Jeff Speaks on April 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The term "theory of meaning" has figured, in one way or another, in a great number of philosophical disputes
Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Jeff Speaks on April 23, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The term "theory of meaning" has figured, in one way or another, in a great number of philosophical disputes over the last century. Unfortunately, this term has also been used to mean a great number of different things. Here I focus on two sorts of "theory of meaning." The first sort of theory - a semantic theory - is a theory which...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Relative Cost of Education

As a professor I am aware that the cost of a university education has increased significantly, even adjusting for inflation. I am also well aware that this cost increase is not due to proportional
Philosophy News image
A Plumber at work. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) As a professor I am aware that the cost of a university education has increased significantly, even adjusting for inflation. I am also well aware that this cost increase is not due to proportional increases in faculty salary. One reason for this is that the salaries of professors, especially those at state school, tend to be compressed. For faculty who have been around a long time, such as myself, the compression can be quite extreme. This is one reason why star faculty move around relentlessly in search of ever larger salaries. Another reason is that universities are relying very heavily on badly paid adjuncts. While the rates vary, a typical adjunct can make about $24,000 over nine months for teaching eight classes. There are generally no benefits at all, so the cost to schools is rather low. Given that such faculty typically have advanced degrees, they are perhaps the worst paid of the best educated. It is true, as I mentioned, that. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Talking Philosophy

God, Mind, and Logical Space: A Revisionary Approach to Divinity

2014.04.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews István Aranyosi, God, Mind, and Logical Space: A Revisionary Approach to Divinity, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 210pp.,
Philosophy News image
2014.04.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews István Aranyosi, God, Mind, and Logical Space: A Revisionary Approach to Divinity, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 210pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781137280312. Reviewed by Daniel Bonevac, University of Texas at Austin István Aranyosi addresses issues in the philosophy of religion in an unusually creative way, taking a path through logic, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mind to sweeping and highly original conclusions. His book is packed with novel insights and approaches. The presentation is concise, indeed, at times, compressed. Many of the arguments could have profited from a more extended treatment. Still, this is a remarkably ambitious and innovative book. The first part, dealing mostly with metaphysics and the philosophy of logic, presents Aranyosi's conception of logical space. The second part, dealing mostly with the philosophy of mind, develops aspects of logical. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Justification and Critique: Towards a Critical Theory of Politics

2014.04.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rainer Forst, Justification and Critique: Towards a Critical Theory of Politics, Ciaran Cronin (tr.), Polity, 2014, 216pp.,
Philosophy News image
2014.04.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rainer Forst, Justification and Critique: Towards a Critical Theory of Politics, Ciaran Cronin (tr.), Polity, 2014, 216pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745652290. Reviewed by Uwe Steinhoff, The University of Hong Kong Rainer Forst's new book is, according to him, an attempt to develop the program of a theory of justification further -- first when it comes to clarifying basic concepts of political philosophy and, in addition, as regards its implications for critical theory and the possible limits of a mode of thought which accords central importance to discursive justice. (viii) These concepts prominently include human dignity, human rights, justice, justification, recognition, and tolerance, among others. Yet the book is a rather unsystematic collection of essays, and hence the connections between the different chapters are often tenuous. In particular the last part (“Beyond. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Want to reboot civilization?

In the event of a mega-catastrophe, a civilization-erasing event, what is the most important piece of knowledge for humans to preserve?…
Philosophy News image
In the event of a mega-catastrophe, a civilization-erasing event, what is the most important piece of knowledge for humans to preserve?… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily