Trump & Mercenaries: Arguments Against

Embed from Getty Images While there are some appealing arguments in favor of the United States employing mercenaries, there are also arguments against this position. One obvious set of arguments is
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Embed from Getty Images While there are some appealing arguments in favor of the United States employing mercenaries, there are also arguments against this position. One obvious set of arguments is composed of those that focus on the practical problems of employing mercenaries. These problems include broad concerns about the competence of the mercenaries (such as worries about their combat effectiveness and discipline) as well as worries about the quality of their equipment. These concerns can, of course, be addressed on a case by case basis. Some mercenary operations are composed of well-trained, well-equipped ex-soldiers who are every bit as capable as professional soldiers serving their countries. If competent and properly equipped mercenaries are hired, there will obviously not be problems in these areas. There are also obvious practical concerns about the loyalty and reliability of mercenaries—they are, after all, fighting for money rather than from duty or commitment to. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

<strong>Nazism and the supernatural</strong>. Of all the Third Reich&rsquo;s bizarre experiments with the occult, none was embraced as effusively as World Ice Theory. Hitler thought it would replace Christianity

Nazism and the supernatural. Of all the Third Reich&amp;rsquo;s bizarre experiments with the occult, none was embraced as effusively as World Ice Theory. Hitler thought it would replace
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Nazism and the supernatural. Of all the Third Reich’s bizarre experiments with the occult, none was embraced as effusively as World Ice Theory. Hitler thought it would replace Christianity

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The <strong>magic mongoose</strong>? Gef, a contemporary of Nessie, was believed to speak a range of foreign languages, sing, whistle, cough, swear, dance, and attend political meetings

The magic mongoose? Gef, a contemporary of Nessie, was believed to speak a range of foreign languages, sing, whistle, cough, swear, dance, and attend political
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The magic mongoose? Gef, a contemporary of Nessie, was believed to speak a range of foreign languages, sing, whistle, cough, swear, dance, and attend political meetings

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Richard Rorty </strong>thought of himself as an American philosopher. American philosophers saw him as a European intellectual, and his philosophy as a betrayal. It wasn't

Richard Rorty thought of himself as an American philosopher. American philosophers saw him as a European intellectual, and his philosophy as a betrayal. It
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Richard Rorty thought of himself as an American philosopher. American philosophers saw him as a European intellectual, and his philosophy as a betrayal. It wasn't

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Petitionary Prayer: A Philosophical Investigation

2017.07.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Scott Davison, Petitionary Prayer: A Philosophical Investigation, Oxford University Press, 2017, $75.00, 189 pp., ISBN
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2017.07.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Scott Davison, Petitionary Prayer: A Philosophical Investigation, Oxford University Press, 2017, $75.00, 189 pp., ISBN 978019975774. Reviewed by Stephen J. Wykstra, Calvin College This book is, as its subtitle advertises, "a philosophical investigation." Petitionary prayer is what the Apostle Paul enjoins Christians to do in Philippians 4:6: "in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God." On a natural reading, this verse seems to suppose that such supplications can, sometimes at least, make a pivotal difference to God -- i.e., a difference such that, for at least some significant span of cases, were one to forgo the asking, God would forgo the providing. Or as we might (and Scott Davison does) for short paraphrase it: for divine provision of certain goods, for some significant span of cases, "God requires prayer." Davison's central question is whether,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Descartes' Ethics

[Revised entry by Donald Rutherford on July 27, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Descartes is not well known for his contributions to ethics. Some have charged that it is a weakness of
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[Revised entry by Donald Rutherford on July 27, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Descartes is not well known for his contributions to ethics. Some have charged that it is a weakness of his philosophy that it focuses exclusively on metaphysics and epistemology to the exclusion of moral and political philosophy. Such criticisms rest on a misunderstanding of the broader framework of Descartes' philosophy. Evidence of Descartes' concern for the practical import of philosophy can be traced to his earliest writings. In agreement with the...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

It happened gradually. The surges, surprising transitions, turns of phrases came less often. Then hardly at all. For <strong>Sven Birkerts</strong>, writing became a lot more difficult

It happened gradually. The surges, surprising transitions, turns of phrases came less often. Then hardly at all. For Sven Birkerts, writing became a lot more
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It happened gradually. The surges, surprising transitions, turns of phrases came less often. Then hardly at all. For Sven Birkerts, writing became a lot more difficult

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

If these are the <strong>end times </strong>of civilization &mdash; ecological collapse, social and political unraveling &mdash; it's worth asking: What sort of art comes out of such a dire reckoning?

If these are the end times of civilization &amp;mdash; ecological collapse, social and political unraveling &amp;mdash; it&#39;s worth asking: What sort of art comes out of such a dire
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If these are the end times of civilization — ecological collapse, social and political unraveling — it's worth asking: What sort of art comes out of such a dire reckoning?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Disturbed by the state of the world, <strong>W.S. Merwin </strong>turned to environmentalism. He cultivated a garden composted with manuscripts that other poets had sent him

Disturbed by the state of the world, W.S. Merwin turned to environmentalism. He cultivated a garden composted with manuscripts that other poets had sent
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Disturbed by the state of the world, W.S. Merwin turned to environmentalism. He cultivated a garden composted with manuscripts that other poets had sent him

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Kant's Theory of Normativity,

2017.07.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Konstantin Pollok, Kant&#39;s Theory of Normativity, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 350pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107127807.
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2017.07.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Konstantin Pollok, Kant's Theory of Normativity, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 350pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107127807. Reviewed by Yoon H. Choi, Marquette University Konstantin Pollok begins by drawing attention to the radical nature of Kant's Copernican turn. We miss its full significance, he argues, if we cast it as a demure retreat from ontology to epistemology (14, 25). Kant effects something far bolder: the final displacement of divine perfection from its traditional role as "ultimate and unique source of normativity" (23). But what comes next? Does it remain true that there are ways we ought to think and act, perhaps even feel? Where could such standards come from, and what could give them their authority? Kant's answer to these questions is familiar enough: reason and reason alone is to be our guide. But it remains far from clear what this answer means, and... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News