The Continuant Argument

I listed five false consequences of the standard view of personhood. Let me offer the continuant argument that I’m not a person. I mean, of course, that I am not essentially a person in the
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I listed five false consequences of the standard view of personhood. Let me offer the continuant argument that I’m not a person. I mean, of course, that I am not essentially a person in the standard sense of personhood. I’d like to know where the argument goes wrong. I can’t see any place where it [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Experiment in Physics

[Revised entry by Allan Franklin and Slobodan Perovic on February 27, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, app7.html] Physics, and natural science in general, is a reasonable enterprise
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[Revised entry by Allan Franklin and Slobodan Perovic on February 27, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, app7.html] Physics, and natural science in general, is a reasonable enterprise based on valid experimental evidence, criticism, and rational discussion. It provides us with knowledge of the physical world, and it is experiment that provides the evidence that grounds this knowledge. Experiment plays many roles in science. One of its important roles is to test theories and to provide the basis for scientific knowledge.[1]...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Spinoza, Self Help and Agency

View image | gettyimages.com The bookshelves of the world abound with tomes on self-help. Many of these profess to help people with various emotional woes, such as sadness, and make vague
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View image | gettyimages.com The bookshelves of the world abound with tomes on self-help. Many of these profess to help people with various emotional woes, such as sadness, and make vague promises about happiness.  Interestingly enough, philosophers have long been in the business of offering advice on how to be happy. Or at least not too sad. Each spring semester I teach Modern Philosophy and cover our good dead friend Spinoza. In addition to an exciting career as a lens grinder, he also manage to avoid being killed by an assassin. However, breathing in all that glass dust seems to have ultimately contributed to his untimely death. But enough about his life and death, it is time to get to the point of this essay. As Spinoza saw it, people are slaves to their emotion and chained to what they love, such as fame, fortune and other people. This inevitably leads to sadness: the people we love betray us or die. That fancy Tesla can be smashed in a wreck. The beach house can be swept away. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Genderalizations

Literary history is male-dominated. Literary journalism, too. But rest assured that editors are keenly aware of the problem…
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Literary history is male-dominated. Literary journalism, too. But rest assured that editors are keenly aware of the problem… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Afterlife

From Gilgamesh on, the afterlife has taken many guises. Our view is an incoherent projection of needs and impulses, irreconcilably at odds…
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From Gilgamesh on, the afterlife has taken many guises. Our view is an incoherent projection of needs and impulses, irreconcilably at odds… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of George Santayana

2015.02.39 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Morris Grossman, Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of George Santayana, Martin A. Coleman (ed.), Fordham University Press,
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2015.02.39 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Morris Grossman, Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of George Santayana, Martin A. Coleman (ed.), Fordham University Press, 2014, 315pp., $26.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780823257232. Reviewed by Matthew Caleb Flamm, Rockford University In a climate where print academic publications are increasingly financially unfeasible it is encouraging to see presses like Fordham University's backing a rich, eclectic collection like this one by Morris Grossman. Grossman died in 2012, and the book honors his scholarly career. As a brief preface by the editor Martin A. Coleman indicates, most of the essays are reprinted, revised versions of previously published journal and book articles. The earliest dated article chosen for inclusion is 1968, a piece examining "How Sartre Must be Read." Most of the remaining selections are dated as having appeared in the seventies and eighties, a few in the nineties, one in 2005 and two. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Against self-criticism

Self-criticism is integral to our sense of self. What does this unrelenting, unforgiving, internal nag want? Adam Philips hazards an answer…
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Self-criticism is integral to our sense of self. What does this unrelenting, unforgiving, internal nag want? Adam Philips hazards an answer… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Question about Education - Allen Stairs responds

Is Plato right when he says that ignorance is the source of all evil? I live in the American south, and a large number of the people here are, in my opinion, ignorant; and i recently got into an
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Is Plato right when he says that ignorance is the source of all evil? I live in the American south, and a large number of the people here are, in my opinion, ignorant; and i recently got into an argument with a class mate of mine who said that ignorance is bliss. At least half of the people at my school have his attitude, they don't care about their education and they prefer to not deal with things that might broaden their horizons. If ignorance is the source of evil, does that mean that my area is a hot spot for evil, or is my definition of evil wrong? Response from: Allen Stairs Let's start with a distinction. We may say that a situation is evil if it's sufficiently bad, whatever it was that brought the situation about—even if no one intended it. But we don't usually say that a person is evil unless they have evil intentions. Start with evil people. In the kind of case that comes most easily to mind, ignorance isn't the issue. Sadly, there are people who just don't care. If. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Implicit Bias

[New Entry by Michael Brownstein on February 26, 2015.] "Implicit bias" is a term of art referring to relatively unconscious and relatively automatic features of prejudiced judgment and social
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[New Entry by Michael Brownstein on February 26, 2015.] "Implicit bias" is a term of art referring to relatively unconscious and relatively automatic features of prejudiced judgment and social behavior. While psychologists in the field of "implicit social cognition" study "implicit attitudes" toward consumer products, self-esteem, food, alcohol, political values, and more, the most striking and well-known research has focused on implicit attitudes toward members of socially stigmatized groups, such as African-Americans, women, and the LGBTQ community.[1] For...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Question about Philosophers - Eddy Nahmias responds

Dear Philosophers, Can someone recommend a biography of Baruch Spinoza? Thank you Response from: Eddy Nahmias I haven't read Rebecca Goldstein's biography of Spinoza, but she's a great writer
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Dear Philosophers, Can someone recommend a biography of Baruch Spinoza? Thank you Response from: Eddy Nahmias I haven't read Rebecca Goldstein's biography of Spinoza, but she's a great writer (with PhD in philosophy) and my dad liked it. I can't vouch for how thorough it is, but it will give you a sense of his philosophical views as well. http://www.amazon.com/Betraying-Spinoza-Renegade-Modernity-Encounters/dp/0805211594

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"