Theses on the Feminist Novel

Here’s the thing about feminist novels: If the feminist ambition overrides the narrative ambition, it isn’t a novel. Roxane Gay explains…
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Here’s the thing about feminist novels: If the feminist ambition overrides the narrative ambition, it isn’t a novel. Roxane Gay explains… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Cornel West’s Disappointing Decline

From public intellectual to public personality. Cornel West seems more interested in name-dropping and ego-stroking than original thought…
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From public intellectual to public personality. Cornel West seems more interested in name-dropping and ego-stroking than original thought… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Blinded by Nostalgia

In America, left and right alike suffer from a surfeit of nostalgia. Both sides want to salvage an old vision of the future. The result: pessimism and uneasiness…
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In America, left and right alike suffer from a surfeit of nostalgia. Both sides want to salvage an old vision of the future. The result: pessimism and uneasiness… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Lessons from Ebola

While Ebola outbreaks are not new, the latest outbreak has provided some important lessons. These lessons are actually nothing new, but the outbreak does provide a focus for discussing them. The
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English: Biosafety level 4 hazmat suit: researcher is working with the Ebola virus (Photo credit: Wikipedia) While Ebola outbreaks are not new, the latest outbreak has provided some important lessons. These lessons are actually nothing new, but the outbreak does provide a focus for discussing them. The first lesson is that most people are very bad at risk assessment. In the Ebola hot spots it is reasonable to be worried about catching Ebola. It is also reasonable to be concerned about the situation in general. However, many politicians, pundits and citizens in the United States are greatly overestimating the threat presented by Ebola in the United States. There are only a few cases of Ebola in the United States and the disease is, the experts claim, difficult to catch. As such, the chance that an American will catch Ebola in the United States is extremely low. It is also a fact Ebola outbreaks have been contained before in countries with far less medical resources than the United. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Advances in Experimental Moral Psychology

2014.10.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Hagop Sarkissian and Jennifer Cole Wright (eds.), Advances in Experimental Moral Psychology, Bloomsbury, 2014, 256pp., $112.00
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2014.10.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Hagop Sarkissian and Jennifer Cole Wright (eds.), Advances in Experimental Moral Psychology, Bloomsbury, 2014, 256pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781472509383. Reviewed by Jesse S. Summers, Duke University The distinction between moral psychology and moral philosophy has never been a clear one. Observations about what humans are like plays an indispensable role in understanding our moral obligations and virtues, and great swaths of moral philosophy until the 19th century are psychology avant la lettre, empirical speculations about how we form moral judgments, about mental faculties and rationality, pleasure, pain, and character. This relationship between philosophy and psychology becomes both opaque and strained once experimental psychology develops its own academic discipline. Nevertheless, many contemporary moral debates -- like those surrounding moral character and moral motivation -- are clearly aware of and. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Law and Ideology

[Revised entry by Christine Sypnowich on October 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] If law is a system of enforceable rules governing social relations and legislated by a political
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[Revised entry by Christine Sypnowich on October 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] If law is a system of enforceable rules governing social relations and legislated by a political system, it might seem obvious that law is connected to ideology. Ideology refers, in a general sense, to a system of political ideas, and law and politics seem inextricably intertwined....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Deaths of Ambrose Bierce

In 1913, Ambrose Bierce rode a horse into Mexico and disappeared. There were clues – too many to follow. Indeed, Bierce died over and over again…
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In 1913, Ambrose Bierce rode a horse into Mexico and disappeared. There were clues – too many to follow. Indeed, Bierce died over and over again… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

King of Colors

Mondrian called green a “useless color.” Kandinsky compared it to “a fat cow.” Nonetheless, we live in green’s triumphant age…
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Mondrian called green a “useless color.” Kandinsky compared it to “a fat cow.” Nonetheless, we live in green’s triumphant age… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

End of genius

The end of genius. The label, which once conveyed the supposed superiority of white European males, has outlived its usefulness…
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The end of genius. The label, which once conveyed the supposed superiority of white European males, has outlived its usefulness… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Question about Beauty, Biology - Allen Stairs responds

Are 'dangerous' and 'aesthetically ugly' one and the same thing? I read somewhere once, that arachnophobia evolved as a defence mechanism against dangerous spiders. Even though most spider species
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Are 'dangerous' and 'aesthetically ugly' one and the same thing? I read somewhere once, that arachnophobia evolved as a defence mechanism against dangerous spiders. Even though most spider species are harmless, this evolved response is still there, as it is better to avoid all spiders, even the harmless ones to avoid being bitten by the really deadly ones. Seeing as this aesthetic disgust and fear arose for the purpose of keeping one safe, and very few spiders are actually dangerous, would it be incorrect to view the harmless ones as ugly? Similarly, there are some dangerous animals I consider quite beautiful: tigers, for example. Would it be incorrect to view them as beautiful because they are dangerous? Basically, what I'm trying to ask is, because perception of ugliness evolved to keep us from danger, is danger synonymous with ugliness and is any visual beauty we ascribe to a dangerous animal simply an illusion? Conversely, are non-dangerous animals that we find ugly actually. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"