Imprecise Probabilities

[New Entry by Seamus Bradley on December 20, 2014.] It has been argued that imprecise probabilities are a natural and intuitive way of overcoming some of the issues with orthodox precise
Philosophy News image
[New Entry by Seamus Bradley on December 20, 2014.] It has been argued that imprecise probabilities are a natural and intuitive way of overcoming some of the issues with orthodox precise probabilities. Models of this type have a long pedigree, and interest in such models has been growing in recent years. This article introduces the theory of imprecise probabilities, discusses the motivations for their use and their possible advantages over the standard precise model. It then discusses some philosophical issues raised by this model....

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

New Left history

The writing of history has its own history, which was indelibly shaped by the ambitious and flawed New Left historians…
Philosophy News image
The writing of history has its own history, which was indelibly shaped by the ambitious and flawed New Left historians… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Art of rewriting

“I can’t teach someone to write,” says John Casey, “but I can sometimes teach someone to rewrite.” What he can teach them is craft…
Philosophy News image
“I can’t teach someone to write,” says John Casey, “but I can sometimes teach someone to rewrite.” What he can teach them is craft… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Putin and political fantasy

Russia is a cultivator of theories and doctrines, with an overwhelming temptation to find the secret forces – imagined or not – intent on destroying the nation…
Philosophy News image
Russia is a cultivator of theories and doctrines, with an overwhelming temptation to find the secret forces – imagined or not – intent on destroying the nation… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Beef

One of the challenges presented by the ever-growing human population is producing enough food to feed everyone. There is also the distribution challenge: being able to get the food to the people and
Philosophy News image
Peter Singer’s Animal Liberation, published in 1975, became pivotal. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) One of the challenges presented by the ever-growing human population is producing enough food to feed everyone. There is also the distribution challenge: being able to get the food to the people and ensuring that they can afford a good diet. The population growth is also accompanied by an increase in prosperity—at least in some parts of the world. As people gain income, they tend to change their diet. One change that people commonly undertake is consuming more status foods, such as beef. As such, it seems almost certain that there will be an ever-growing population that wants to consume more beef. This creates something of a problem. Beef is, of course, delicious. While I am well aware of the moral issues surrounding the consumption of meat, at the end of each semester I reward myself with a Publix roast beef sub—with everything. Like most Americans, I am rather fond of beef and my. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Talking Philosophy

Assistant professor in bioethics and public health

Job List:  Americas Name of institution:  Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Philosophy News image
Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics
Town: 
Baltimore, Maryland
Country: 
. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Empty Ideas: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy

2014.12.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Peter Unger, Empty Ideas: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2014, 258pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN
Philosophy News image
2014.12.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Peter Unger, Empty Ideas: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2014, 258pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199330812. Reviewed by Katherine Hawley, University of St Andrews THIS IS NDPR'S LAST REVIEW FOR 2014. WE WILL RESUME PUBLICATION ON JANUARY 11, 2015 BEST... Read More

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Problem of Animal Pain: A Theodicy for All Creatures Great and Small

2014.12.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Trent Dougherty, The Problem of Animal Pain: A Theodicy for All Creatures Great and Small, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 197pp.,
Philosophy News image
2014.12.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Trent Dougherty, The Problem of Animal Pain: A Theodicy for All Creatures Great and Small, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, 197pp., $105.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780230368484. Reviewed by John Schneider, Calvin College/Grand Valley State University Trent Dougherty calls his book "a report from the frontier" (3-4), because so few fellow analytical philosophers have written on the problem of animal pain. The philosophical disputation over God and evil has indeed been focused mainly on human suffering, not so much on the suffering of animals. Michael Murray (Nature Red in Tooth and Claw, 2008) is the conspicuous exception, and Dougherty interacts extensively with parts of Murray's book. I suggest, however, that theologians Christopher Southgate (The Groaning of Creation, 2008) and Nicola Hoggard Creegan (Animal Suffering and the Problem of Evil, 2013) would have been worthy dialogue partners, too, at key points in the. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Donkeys and the military

When did the humble donkey become the ultimate fighting machine? It all began in 520 BC with King Darius I…
Philosophy News image
When did the humble donkey become the ultimate fighting machine? It all began in 520 BC with King Darius I… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Culinary imagination

For Robert Burns (haggis), Virginia Woolf (sausage, haddock), and Emily Dickinson (Black Cake), appetite was important to art…
Philosophy News image
For Robert Burns (haggis), Virginia Woolf (sausage, haddock), and Emily Dickinson (Black Cake), appetite was important to art… more»

Continue reading . . .

News source: Arts & Letters Daily