<strong>Edgar Allan Poe</strong> and his admirers. Baudelaire revered him, as did Tennyson, Hardy, and Yeats. Edmund Wilson thought him the finest critic America ever produced

Edgar Allan Poe and his admirers. Baudelaire revered him, as did Tennyson, Hardy, and Yeats. Edmund Wilson thought him the finest critic America ever
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Edgar Allan Poe and his admirers. Baudelaire revered him, as did Tennyson, Hardy, and Yeats. Edmund Wilson thought him the finest critic America ever produced

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Cultural critics and English professors face the same problem: How to articulate a <strong>positive case for art</strong> and literature, and talk as if they actually matter

Cultural critics and English professors face the same problem: How to articulate a positive case for art and literature, and talk as if they actually
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Cultural critics and English professors face the same problem: How to articulate a positive case for art and literature, and talk as if they actually matter

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Esperanto enthusiasts</strong> tend to be optimistic, forward-looking idealists. Except when the topic turns to the global dominance of English

Esperanto enthusiasts tend to be optimistic, forward-looking idealists. Except when the topic turns to the global dominance of
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Esperanto enthusiasts tend to be optimistic, forward-looking idealists. Except when the topic turns to the global dominance of English

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Laws 1 and 2

2016.05.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Plato, Laws 1 and 2, Susan Sauv&#233; Meyer (tr. and comm.), Oxford University Press, 2015, 361pp., $74.00 (hbk.), ISBN
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2016.05.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Plato, Laws 1 and 2, Susan Sauvé Meyer (tr. and comm.), Oxford University Press, 2015, 361pp., $74.00 (hbk.), ISBN 9780199604081. Reviewed by David J. Riesbeck, Rice University Philosophical interest in Plato's Laws has recently seen a resurgence following a long period of relative neglect. The works of André Laks and Christopher Bobonich, among others, have inspired philosophers of an analytic persuasion to take the Laws more seriously in its own right, and the quantity and quality of scholarship have increased accordingly. Yet up to now, readers looking for a philosophically sensitive commentary on the work in English have had nowhere to turn. E.B. England's 1921 commentary remains serviceable for those concerned with philological matters, and Klaus Schöpsdau's recently completed multi-volume commentary is a boon for scholars who read German. Readers looking for a more concise but sophisticated treatment,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Philosophers and their religious practices part 20: Using philosophy to using philosophy to help share the Gospel

This is the twentieth&#160;installment of a series of interviews I am conducting with academic philosophers about their religious practices. In this series of interviews, I ask philosophers about their
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This is the twentieth installment of a series of interviews I am conducting with academic philosophers about their religious practices. In this series of interviews, I ask philosophers about their religious practices and the influence on their philosophical work. Follow the links for parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. The contributors are in various stages of their career, tenured and untenured. [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

Leo Strauss

[Revised entry by Leora Batnitzky on May 24, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Leo Strauss was a twentieth-century German Jewish emigre to the United States whose intellectual corpus
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[Revised entry by Leora Batnitzky on May 24, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Leo Strauss was a twentieth-century German Jewish emigre to the United States whose intellectual corpus spans ancient, medieval and modern political philosophy and includes, among others, studies of Plato, Maimonides, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, and Nietzsche. Strauss wrote mainly as a historian of philosophy and most of his writings take the form of commentaries on important thinkers and their writings. Yet as he put it: "There is no inquiry into the history of philosophy that is not at the same time a...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>Speak, butterfly</strong>. How the intricate structures of <em>Pnin</em>, <em>Lolita</em>, and <em>Pale Fire</em> were inspired by Nabokov's dissections of butterfly genitalia

Speak, butterfly. How the intricate structures of Pnin, Lolita, and Pale Fire were inspired by Nabokov&#39;s dissections of butterfly
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Speak, butterfly. How the intricate structures of Pnin, Lolita, and Pale Fire were inspired by Nabokov's dissections of butterfly genitalia

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Want to <strong>eat like Alfred Hitchcock</strong>? Learn what Joan Crawford thrived on, apart from anger, spite, and bile? Now there's a book for that

Want to eat like Alfred Hitchcock? Learn what Joan Crawford thrived on, apart from anger, spite, and bile? Now there&#39;s a book for
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Want to eat like Alfred Hitchcock? Learn what Joan Crawford thrived on, apart from anger, spite, and bile? Now there's a book for that

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Emily Dickinson</strong> was known in her own time as a naturalist and botanist. Her gardens provided her with tropes, narratives, and imagery

Emily Dickinson was known in her own time as a naturalist and botanist. Her gardens provided her with tropes, narratives, and
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Emily Dickinson was known in her own time as a naturalist and botanist. Her gardens provided her with tropes, narratives, and imagery

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Inborn Knowledge: The Mystery Within

2016.05.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Colin McGinn, Inborn Knowledge: The Mystery Within, MIT Press, 2015, 137pp., $32.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262029391. Reviewed by
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2016.05.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Colin McGinn, Inborn Knowledge: The Mystery Within, MIT Press, 2015, 137pp., $32.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262029391. Reviewed by Peter Carruthers, University of Maryland This book is mercifully short (just 102 smallish pages of main text). My review will attempt to match it for brevity. The book is framed around the contrast between Lockean empiricism and Cartesian nativism. Locke held that the contents of the mind are more-or-less veridically impressed upon it from without. McGinn devotes considerable time to arguing that this is untenable, on a variety of grounds. The mind is not, and cannot be, a blank slate. It has structure, resulting from the unfolding of a genetic program. But of course no contemporary empiricist denies this. Almost everyone now allows that our sensory systems embody implicit knowledge of the structure of the world. Indeed Fodor (1981, 2008), whose nativism is in many respects even more. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News