How the Nazis pursued a<strong> new aesthetics for a new political order</strong>&nbsp;<span>&mdash;</span> and showed how swiftly liberal principles can be hollowed out

How the Nazis pursued a new aesthetics for a new political order&amp;nbsp;&amp;mdash; and showed how swiftly liberal principles can be hollowed
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How the Nazis pursued a new aesthetics for a new political order — and showed how swiftly liberal principles can be hollowed out

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Epistemology of Religion

[Revised entry by Peter Forrest on May 26, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Contemporary epistemology of religion may conveniently be treated as a debate over whether evidentialism
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[Revised entry by Peter Forrest on May 26, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Contemporary epistemology of religion may conveniently be treated as a debate over whether evidentialism applies to religious beliefs, or whether we should instead adopt a more permissive epistemology. Here evidentialism is the initially plausible position that a belief is justified only if "it is proportioned to the evidence". For example, suppose a local weather forecaster has noticed that over the two hundred years since records began a wetter than average Winter is followed in 85% of...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Fifty years after her genteel verse graced the Yale Younger Poets series, <strong>Adrienne Rich</strong> had become a dissident. She hadn&rsquo;t exactly chosen poetry in the first place

Fifty years after her genteel verse graced the Yale Younger Poets series, Adrienne Rich had become a dissident. She hadn&amp;rsquo;t exactly chosen poetry in the first
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Fifty years after her genteel verse graced the Yale Younger Poets series, Adrienne Rich had become a dissident. She hadn’t exactly chosen poetry in the first place

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

God, Belief, and Perplexity

2017.05.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews William E. Mann, God, Belief, and Perplexity, Oxford University Press, 2016, 257pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190459208.
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2017.05.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews William E. Mann, God, Belief, and Perplexity, Oxford University Press, 2016, 257pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190459208. Reviewed by Ashley Dressel, College of St. Scholastica This volume brings together fourteen of William E. Mann's previously published essays on Augustine, Anselm, and Abelard, examining a rich variety of topics from the widely discussed, like Anselm's ontological argument, to those that receive less contemporary attention, like Augustine's remarks on infant sin. Perplexity finds its way into most chapters: Mann raises questions he does not always answer, points to puzzles he believes Augustine, Abelard, and Anselm left unresolved, and examines the function of the aporetic in Augustine's works explicitly. The book jacket notes that the essays in this work complement those found in Mann's God, Modality, and Morality. While this is certainly true, the connections between the volumes are not. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

For the Third Reich, dominance culturally was as important as politically and economically. The Nazis pursued <strong>a new aesthetics for a new order</strong> -- and showed how swiftly liberal principles can be hollowed out

For the Third Reich, dominance culturally was as important as politically and economically. The Nazis pursued a new aesthetics for a new order -- and showed how swiftly liberal principles can be
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For the Third Reich, dominance culturally was as important as politically and economically. The Nazis pursued a new aesthetics for a new order -- and showed how swiftly liberal principles can be hollowed out

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Jean Jacques Rousseau

[Revised entry by Christopher Bertram on May 26, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Jean-Jacques Rousseau remains an important figure in the history of philosophy, both because of his
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[Revised entry by Christopher Bertram on May 26, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Jean-Jacques Rousseau remains an important figure in the history of philosophy, both because of his contributions to political philosophy and moral psychology and because of his influence on later thinkers. Rousseau's own view of philosophy and philosophers was firmly negative, seeing philosophers as the post-hoc rationalizers of self-interest, as apologists for various forms of tyranny, and as playing a role in the alienation of the modern individual from humanity's natural impulse to...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

<strong>How can we be</strong>? The fMRI can't identify the source of consciousness, but it can bring the problem into sharper relief

How can we be? The fMRI can&#39;t identify the source of consciousness, but it can bring the problem into sharper
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How can we be? The fMRI can't identify the source of consciousness, but it can bring the problem into sharper relief

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Wagering on an Ironic God: Pascal on Faith and Philosophy

2017.05.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Thomas S. Hibbs, Wagering on an Ironic God: Pascal on Faith and Philosophy, Baylor University Press, 2017, 204pp., $44.95 (hbk),
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2017.05.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Thomas S. Hibbs, Wagering on an Ironic God: Pascal on Faith and Philosophy, Baylor University Press, 2017, 204pp., $44.95 (hbk), ISBN 9781481306386. Reviewed by Graeme Hunter, University of Ottawa(Emeritus)/Dominican University College This unusual book is not a typical monograph on Pascal. It is a collection of five related essays. The first, "Irony, Philosophy and the Christian Faith," sketches the argument the author intends to develop. The second and third, on Montaigne and Descartes respectively, provide sketches of the late Renaissance and early modern figures with whom Hibbs plans to compare and contrast Pascal. The fourth chapter, called "The Quest for Wisdom", develops Pascal's uniquely "ironic" approach to philosophical inquiry. The final chapter, from which the book derives its title, is a study of Pascal's famous "Wager Argument." Hibbs takes for granted -- what no one contests -- that Pascal. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Philosophy Incarnate

Sheldon Currie watches Socrates take on the modern
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Sheldon Currie watches Socrates take on the modern academy.

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News source: Philosophy Now

Raymond Tallis

Our columnist has just released a major book on the philosophy of time. Grant Bartley interviews him about Of Time and
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Our columnist has just released a major book on the philosophy of time. Grant Bartley interviews him about Of Time and Lamentation.

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News source: Philosophy Now