Transhumanism and The Journal of Evolution and Technology

This piece was first published over on the IEET site (and I’ve also just reblogged it at my personal blog, The Hellfire Club). It sets out briefly what The Journal of Evolution and Technology
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This piece was first published over on the IEET site (and I’ve also just reblogged it at my personal blog, The Hellfire Club). It sets out briefly what The Journal of Evolution and Technology is all about, for those who might be interested. I’ve had the honor of serving as editor-in-chief of The Journal of Evolution and Technology (henceforth “JET”) since January 2008 – so it’s now approaching seven years! Where did the time go? Having been invited by Kris Notaro to write something about an aspect of transhumanism as it involves me professionally, I’m taking the opportunity to reflect briefly on JET and its mission. We have a great story to tell, and perhaps we should tell it more often. JET was founded in 1998 as The Journal of Transhumanism, and was originally published by the World Transhumanist Association. In November 2004, it moved under the umbrella of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, which, of course, seeks to contribute to understanding of the impact. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Does the history of philosophy matter?

Histories of philosophy are difficult to write. Bertrand Russell excelled. Then there’s Peter Adamson’s new, pun-laden work…
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Histories of philosophy are difficult to write. Bertrand Russell excelled. Then there’s Peter Adamson’s new, pun-laden work… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Jean Guéhenno’s diary

Can we learn moral heroism from books? The diary of Jean Guéhenno, mid-20th-century French intellectual, suggests so…
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Can we learn moral heroism from books? The diary of Jean Guéhenno, mid-20th-century French intellectual, suggests so… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

About the Shark

Oliver Wendell Holmes’s mollusk, Emily Dickinson’s snake, Melville’s Maldive shark: What about animals makes them such attractive poetic subjects>/b>? Their inscrutability, for one…
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Oliver Wendell Holmes’s mollusk, Emily Dickinson’s snake, Melville’s Maldive shark: What about animals makes them such attractive poetic subjects>/b>? Their inscrutability, for one… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Plato and The Stoics

2014.09.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews A. G. Long (ed.), Plato and The Stoics, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 199pp., $90.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107040595. Reviewed
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2014.09.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews A. G. Long (ed.), Plato and The Stoics, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 199pp., $90.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107040595. Reviewed by Jacob Klein, Colgate University This collection of seven essays is a valuable addition to the growing number of studies dealing with Plato's influence on early Stoicism and Stoicism's relationship to Platonism generally.[1] It offers fresh interpretations of several recent controversies and takes up a number of new issues, focusing especially on questions of transmission, reception and response. Malcolm Schofield's "Cardinal Virtues: A Contested Socratic Inheritance" considers a "beginning episode" in Stoic thinking about the leading virtues, taking off from a puzzling feature of the theory ascribed to Zeno: Zeno is said by Plutarch to have made practical wisdom (phronêsis) the essence of moderation, courage, and justice. If Zeno also recognized phronêsis as a leading virtue in its. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Gaming Newcomb’s Paradox I: Problem Solved

One of the many annoying decision theory puzzles is Newcomb’s Paradox. The paradox was created by William Newcomb of the University of California’s Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The dread
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Billy Jack (Photo credit: Wikipedia) One of the many annoying decision theory puzzles is Newcomb’s Paradox. The paradox was created by William Newcomb of the University of California’s Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The dread philosopher Robert Nozick published a paper on it in 1969 and it was popularized in Martin Gardner’s 1972 Scientific American column. The paradox involves a game controlled by the Predictor, a being that is supposed to be masterful at predictions. Like many entities with but one ominous name, the Predictor’s predictive capabilities vary with each telling of the tale. The specific range is from having an exceptional chance of success to being infallible. The basis of the Predictor’s power also vary. In the science-fiction variants, it can be a psychic, a super alien, or a brain scanning machine. In the fantasy versions, the Predictor is a supernatural entity, such as a deity. In Nozick’s telling of the tale, the predictions are “almost certainly”. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Martin Scorsese’s NYRB

Think of a compelling idea for a film. Whatever you come up with has more cinematic sizzle than a documentary about the 50-year arc of a literary journal…
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Think of a compelling idea for a film. Whatever you come up with has more cinematic sizzle than a documentary about the 50-year arc of a literary journal… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Dinosaurs on Noah’s Ark?

Behind the animatronic Adams and sexpot Eves that attract visitors to the Creation Museum is a humorless Australian named Ken Ham…
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Behind the animatronic Adams and sexpot Eves that attract visitors to the Creation Museum is a humorless Australian named Ken Ham… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Life of Tennessee Williams

Tennessee Williams was always writing, at least in part, about his homosexuality. But the relationship between his plots and his private life is fuzzy…
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Tennessee Williams was always writing, at least in part, about his homosexuality. But the relationship between his plots and his private life is fuzzy… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Figure of this World: Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology

2014.09.33 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mathew Abbot, The Figure of this World: Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology, Edinburgh University Press, 2014, 220pp.,
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2014.09.33 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mathew Abbot, The Figure of this World: Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology, Edinburgh University Press, 2014, 220pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780748684090. Reviewed by Jessica Whyte, University of Western Sydney "What if we have been reading Agamben wrong?" This is the intriguing question posed by Mathew Abbott's new book. Indeed, while the reception of Agamben's work in the English-speaking world was bound up with the events that seemed to confirm its central theses -- the war on terror and the suspensions of basic rights it entailed, the opening of internment camps for unauthorized immigrants, etc. -- the descriptive value of his thought was double-edged. While it led to enormous interest in his work across a range of disciplines, it tended also to obscure the underlying philosophical claims about the nature of Western politics and metaphysics that provided the horizon of intelligibility for his. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News