Guns & Suicide

Judging from the news coverage, it would be natural to think that mass shootings with assault rifles are the most common form of gun violence. As is often the case, the extent of media coverage is
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Judging from the news coverage, it would be natural to think that mass shootings with assault rifles are the most common form of gun violence. As is often the case, the extent of media coverage is no indicator of the true facts of the matter—to think otherwise would be to fall victim to the spotlight fallacy. While mass shootings are all too common, the number of people killed per year in such events is only a small fraction of deaths involving guns. The vast majority of gun deaths are self-inflicted: 21,334 of the 33,599 known gun deaths in 2014 were suicides. Of the remaining deaths, homicides accounted for 10,945, accidents 586 and police interventions resulted in 464 deaths. The death tolls in these three categories has been stable since 2000, but gun suicides increased significantly during this time. As should be expected, there have been various attempts to address this problem. When attempts to prevent successful suicide focus on guns, a common counter is to repeat the saying. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

A story of how a cluttered mind can find itself in clover

Once again, no gleanings: the comments have been too few, and there have been no questions. Perhaps when the time for a real rich harvest comes, I’ll start gleaning like a house on fire. When last
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Once again, no gleanings: the comments have been too few, and there have been no questions. Perhaps when the time for a real rich harvest comes, I’ll start gleaning like a house on fire. When last week I attacked the verb clutter, I planned on continuing with the kl-series; my next candidates were cloud and cloth. The nearest future will show whether I have enough material for cloud; at the moment, I can only say that the origin of cloth is a worthwhile topic.  However, before I deal with cloth, it may be useful to devote a post to clover (some difficulties in the treatment of cloth and clover are similar), even though one can read a long entry on it in my etymological dictionary. Old English had two forms of the word for “clover”: clāfre ~ clābre and clæfre (also with a long vowel; æ had the value of a in Modern Engl. man). The presence of long æ alternating with long a gave etymologists a good deal of trouble, but I will ignore this problem, for it is not the phonetic but the. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

How well do you know Bertrand Russell? [quiz]

This June, the OUP Philosophy team honors Bertrand Russell (May 18, 1872 – February 2, 1970) as their Philosopher of the Month. Considered among the most distinguished philosophers of the 20th
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This June, the OUP Philosophy team honors Bertrand Russell (May 18, 1872 – February 2, 1970) as their Philosopher of the Month. Considered among the most distinguished philosophers of the 20th century, Russell’s style, wit, and contributions to a wide range of philosophical fields made him an influential figure in both academic and popular philosophy. But how much do you know about this renown thinker? Test your knowledge of Russell with the quiz below. Quiz image credit: drawing of Bertrand Russell by James Francis Horrabin (1884-1962). Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.  Featured image credit: photo of Colwyn Bay, Wales by Ken Tholke. CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.  The post How well do you know Bertrand Russell? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesHow well do you know David Hume? [quiz]How well do you know Immanuel Kant? [quiz]Philosopher of the month: Bertrand Russell 

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

A humanistic discipline should range across all of human experience. So why is <strong>philosophy so homogeneous</strong>, provincial, and white

A humanistic discipline should range across all of human experience. So why is philosophy so homogeneous, provincial, and
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A humanistic discipline should range across all of human experience. So why is philosophy so homogeneous, provincial, and white

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The unlikely <strong>William Empson</strong>. A socialist who revered the British monarchy, a bisexual bohemian banished from academe, a genius

The unlikely William Empson. A socialist who revered the British monarchy, a bisexual bohemian banished from academe, a
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The unlikely William Empson. A socialist who revered the British monarchy, a bisexual bohemian banished from academe, a genius

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Picasso created more than 13,000 paintings and drawings. Defoe wrote 500 published works. When it comes to creativity, <strong>how much is too much</strong>?

Picasso created more than 13,000 paintings and drawings. Defoe wrote 500 published works. When it comes to creativity, how much is too
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Picasso created more than 13,000 paintings and drawings. Defoe wrote 500 published works. When it comes to creativity, how much is too much?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Preparation for Natural Theology: With Kant's Notes and the Danzig Rational Theology Transcript

2016.06.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Johann August Eberhard and Immanuel Kant, Preparation for Natural Theology: With Kant&#39;s Notes and the Danzig Rational Theology
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2016.06.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Johann August Eberhard and Immanuel Kant, Preparation for Natural Theology: With Kant's Notes and the Danzig Rational Theology Transcript, Courtney D. Fugate and John Hymers (eds. and trs.), Bloomsbury, xlviii+279pp., $145.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474213837. Reviewed by Stephen R. Palmquist, Hong Kong Baptist University This is the second in a series of planned books whose purpose is to produce English editions of many of the key sources that Kant used in his teaching and in the development of his philosophical system. The series will do much to further and deepen the historical accuracy of English-language Kant-scholarship, especially works such as the one featured here, by Johann August Eberhard, which Kant used as a textbook for his course on rational theology. When used in conjunction with the published lecture notes written by Kant’s students (one example of which appears in the present collection), the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

A Priorism in Moral Epistemology

[New Entry by Michael DePaul and Amelia Hicks on June 28, 2016.] A priori knowledge is, in an important sense, independent of experience. If a proposition can be known a priori, then we can somehow
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[New Entry by Michael DePaul and Amelia Hicks on June 28, 2016.] A priori knowledge is, in an important sense, independent of experience. If a proposition can be known a priori, then we can somehow see that it is true just by thinking and reasoning about it (see entry on a priori justification and knowledge). Here are some paradigm examples of propositions one can know a priori:...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The brainy segments of society <strong>fetishize smarts</strong>, glorify intelligence, and embrace the idea that giftedness is the primary yardstick of human worth. It's not

The brainy segments of society fetishize smarts, glorify intelligence, and embrace the idea that giftedness is the primary yardstick of human worth. It&#39;s
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The brainy segments of society fetishize smarts, glorify intelligence, and embrace the idea that giftedness is the primary yardstick of human worth. It's not

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Beauty tips, stock tips, a defense of anorexia, a breast augmentation at 73. <strong>Helen Gurley Brown</strong> wasn't exactly an intellectual, but she was a philosopher

Beauty tips, stock tips, a defense of anorexia, a breast augmentation at 73. Helen Gurley Brown wasn&#39;t exactly an intellectual, but she was a
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Beauty tips, stock tips, a defense of anorexia, a breast augmentation at 73. Helen Gurley Brown wasn't exactly an intellectual, but she was a philosopher

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily