When black intellectuals interpet black life for white audiences, the question of racial authenticity arises. What is <strong>authentic black knowledge</strong>?

When black intellectuals interpet black life for white audiences, the question of racial authenticity arises. What is authentic black
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When black intellectuals interpet black life for white audiences, the question of racial authenticity arises. What is authentic black knowledge?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Luck's Mischief: Obligation and Blameworthiness on a Thread

2016.05.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ishtiyaque Haji, Luck&#39;s Mischief: Obligation and Blameworthiness on a Thread, Oxford University Press, 2016, 358pp., $74.00
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2016.05.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ishtiyaque Haji, Luck's Mischief: Obligation and Blameworthiness on a Thread, Oxford University Press, 2016, 358pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190260774. Reviewed by E.J. Coffman, The University of Tennessee Here's a relatively concise formal statement of Ishtiyaque Haji's central argument (HCA) in his impressive new book:[1] (HCA-1) If you morally shouldn't perform an action A, then you're free with respect to A-ing (i.e., you can intentionally perform A and you can intentionally omit A). (HCA-2) If you can neither stop believing you shouldn't A nor acquire motivation to A, then it's (‘false that you can intentionally A. Therefore, (HCA-3) If you can neither stop believing you shouldn't A nor acquire motivation to A, then it's false that you shouldn't A. (HCA-4) For each of a wide range of actions that you believe you shouldn't perform, you can neither stop believing you shouldn't perform it nor acquire. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>The cult of the unfinished</strong>. Incomplete paintings, sculptures, novels, and musical compositions are undeniably seductive - too seductive

The cult of the unfinished. Incomplete paintings, sculptures, novels, and musical compositions are undeniably seductive - too
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The cult of the unfinished. Incomplete paintings, sculptures, novels, and musical compositions are undeniably seductive - too seductive

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Lord Acton</strong> had a library of 67,000 volumes, scrupulously cross-referenced. His miscellanea fill some 50,000 pages. But he never published a book

Lord Acton had a library of 67,000 volumes, scrupulously cross-referenced. His miscellanea fill some 50,000 pages. But he never published a
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Lord Acton had a library of 67,000 volumes, scrupulously cross-referenced. His miscellanea fill some 50,000 pages. But he never published a book

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

After Marriage: Rethinking Marital Relationships

2016.05.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Elizabeth Brake (ed.), After Marriage: Rethinking Marital Relationships, Oxford University Press, 2016, 247pp., $29.95 (pbk),
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2016.05.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Elizabeth Brake (ed.), After Marriage: Rethinking Marital Relationships, Oxford University Press, 2016, 247pp., $29.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780190205089. Reviewed by Raja Halwani, School of the Art Institute of Chicago This short yet stimulating collection of nine new essays tackles questions surrounding marriage that remain even though, or because, same-sex marriage is on its way to becoming legal and fully accepted (at least in the western and some other parts of the world). The essays differ in their strength and incisiveness (though all are good), but all succeed in raising crucial questions about marriage. The first two essays tackle the issue of whether the state can remain neutral about the good life while also supporting marriage. Simon Căbulea May, in "Liberal Neutrality and Civil Marriage," argues that we should think of marriage as a presumptively permanent relationship: "a type of small-scale. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>Frank Gehry</strong>, known for egomaniacal arrogance and an inability to stick to a budget, made his name by turning a shack into a shrine

Frank Gehry, known for egomaniacal arrogance and an inability to stick to a budget, made his name by turning a shack into a
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Frank Gehry, known for egomaniacal arrogance and an inability to stick to a budget, made his name by turning a shack into a shrine

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Nationalism is back</strong>, along with a politics of grievance, belligerence, and isolation. It's a moment for Benedict Anderson, who diagnosed nationalism&rsquo;s insurgent appeal

Nationalism is back, along with a politics of grievance, belligerence, and isolation. It&#39;s a moment for Benedict Anderson, who diagnosed nationalism&amp;rsquo;s insurgent
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Nationalism is back, along with a politics of grievance, belligerence, and isolation. It's a moment for Benedict Anderson, who diagnosed nationalism’s insurgent appeal

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Frank Gehry</strong>, known for egomaniacal arrogance and his inability to adhere to a budget, made his name by turning a shack into a shrine

Frank Gehry, known for egomaniacal arrogance and his inability to adhere to a budget, made his name by turning a shack into a
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Frank Gehry, known for egomaniacal arrogance and his inability to adhere to a budget, made his name by turning a shack into a shrine

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Jenny Diski</strong> - virtuoso novelist, memoirist, essayist; pessimist and misanthrope; - is dead. She was 68.

Jenny Diski - virtuoso novelist, memoirist, essayist; pessimist and misanthrope; - is dead. She was
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Jenny Diski - virtuoso novelist, memoirist, essayist; pessimist and misanthrope; - is dead. She was 68.

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Age of the Poets: And Other Writings on Twentieth-Century Poetry and Prose

2016.05.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Alain Badiou, The Age of the Poets: And Other Writings on Twentieth-Century Poetry and Prose, Emily Apter and Bruno Bosteels
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2016.05.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Alain Badiou, The Age of the Poets: And Other Writings on Twentieth-Century Poetry and Prose, Emily Apter and Bruno Bosteels (trs.), Verso, 2014, 256pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781781685693. Reviewed by Gerald Bruns, University of Notre Dame This volume gathers together Alain Badiou's fugitive writings on literary modernism, or what Badiou calls "the age of the poets," which on his chronology extends from Arthur Rimbaud (1854-91) to Paul Celan (1920-70). Badiou's touchstone is Stéphane Mallarmé (1842-98), specifically Mallarmé's conception of la poésie pur in which the poem is no longer a form of mediation but a materialization of language whose words are scattered as if by chance across the white space of the printed page.[1] In "Crise de vers" (1896), for example, Mallarmé writes: If a poem is to be pure, the poet's voice must be stilled and the initiative taken by the words themselves, which will be set in. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News