To be or not to ‘be’: 9 ways to use this verb [excerpt]

As short as it is, the verb ‘be’ has a range of meanings and uses that have developed over the last 1,500 years. It is—after ‘the’—the second most frequent word in the English language, and if
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As short as it is, the verb ‘be’ has a range of meanings and uses that have developed over the last 1,500 years. It is—after ‘the’—the second most frequent word in the English language, and if you’re not afraid to use it, it can help you become a better writer. For National Novel Writing Month, we’ve laid out the various uses of ‘be’, taken from the Story of Be, to help aid you with your writing. Take a look at the list below and explore some of the different shades of ‘be.’ To be or not to be Existential be The bare be. Capable of being used as a single-word sentence—in grammatical terms, as an imperative. For those imagining a primordial act of creation, a word that brings everything into existence. Business is business Identifying be To identify someone or something, or to assert an identity. Or as the OED definition puts it: ‘To exist as the person or thing known by a certain name or term; to coincide with, to be identical with.’ That seems to sum it up. I am to. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

The Choice Theory of Contracts

2017.11.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Hanoch Dagan and Michael Heller, The Choice Theory of Contracts, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 180pp., $29.99 (pbk), ISBN
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2017.11.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Hanoch Dagan and Michael Heller, The Choice Theory of Contracts, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 180pp., $29.99 (pbk), ISBN 97801316501702. Reviewed by Nicolas Cornell, University of Michigan This book aims to provide a new approach to thinking about the role of contract law in a liberal state. The fundamental idea is that the law should affirmatively facilitate citizens' autonomy by creating and sustaining various different types of contractual relationships so that citizens have the option to choose among them. The authors start from the idea that "bargaining for terms is not the dominant mode of contracting . . . the mainstay of present-day contracting is the choice among types" (2-3). We choose to relate as employees or independent contractors, married or just cohabiting, merchants selling goods or private individuals selling goods as-is. Given that the choice of contract type plays such an important. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

About 95 million images are uploaded to <strong>Instagram</strong> every day. This behavior seems new. But it was prefigured by an earlier aesthetic movement: the picturesque

About 95 million images are uploaded to Instagram every day. This behavior seems new. But it was prefigured by an earlier aesthetic movement: the
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About 95 million images are uploaded to Instagram every day. This behavior seems new. But it was prefigured by an earlier aesthetic movement: the picturesque

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Some 165,000 years ago, people on the South African coast started to eat molluscs and to use the shells as adornments. That&rsquo;s <strong>when humans became human</strong>

Some 165,000 years ago, people on the South African coast started to eat molluscs and to use the shells as adornments. That&amp;rsquo;s when humans became
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Some 165,000 years ago, people on the South African coast started to eat molluscs and to use the shells as adornments. That’s when humans became human

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Viewing other <strong>people as objects</strong> enables our very worst conduct &mdash; that notion has long been a reassuring one. The truth may be harder to accept

Viewing other people as objects enables our very worst conduct &amp;mdash; that notion has long been a reassuring one. The truth may be harder to
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Viewing other people as objects enables our very worst conduct — that notion has long been a reassuring one. The truth may be harder to accept

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Spinoza's Ethics: A Critical Guide

2017.11.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), Spinoza&#39;s Ethics: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 346pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.11.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), Spinoza's Ethics: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 346pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107118119. Reviewed by Matthew Kisner, University of South Carolina Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), Spinoza's Ethics: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 346pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107118119. Matthew Kisner, University of South Carolina The fifteen essays in this Critical Guide aim to contribute to the latest research on Spinoza's Ethics. Rather than focusing on a particular theme, the volume provides balanced coverage of the standard topics (metaphysics, knowledge, emotions, ethics), without falling prey to the common tendency to focus on the first two parts of the Ethics. Consequently, most Spinoza scholars will find something in the volume to be essential reading; the same is likely true for many historians of early modern philosophy generally. The editor has included... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

What does it mean <strong>to be a jerk</strong>? It is to be ignorant of the value of others and the merit of their ideas. Maybe you know one. Maybe you are one

What does it mean to be a jerk? It is to be ignorant of the value of others and the merit of their ideas. Maybe you know one. Maybe you are
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What does it mean to be a jerk? It is to be ignorant of the value of others and the merit of their ideas. Maybe you know one. Maybe you are one

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

To join the <strong>Martin Amis Canon</strong> of Approved Writers, you must be a virtuoso at the sentence level. It also helps to be male, straight, and white

To join the Martin Amis Canon of Approved Writers, you must be a virtuoso at the sentence level. It also helps to be male, straight, and
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To join the Martin Amis Canon of Approved Writers, you must be a virtuoso at the sentence level. It also helps to be male, straight, and white

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Stephen F. Cohen, who says he's skeptical about everything except horses and bourbon, is oddly <strong>credulous about Putin</strong>. His enemies and friends ask the same question: Why?

Stephen F. Cohen, who says he&#39;s skeptical about everything except horses and bourbon, is oddly credulous about Putin. His enemies and friends ask the same question:
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Stephen F. Cohen, who says he's skeptical about everything except horses and bourbon, is oddly credulous about Putin. His enemies and friends ask the same question: Why?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: A Critical Guide

2017.11.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews James R. O&#39;Shea (ed.), Kant&#39;s Critique of Pure Reason: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 297pp., $99.99 (hbk),
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2017.11.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews James R. O'Shea (ed.), Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 297pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107074811. Reviewed by James Messina, University of Wisconsin-Madison This book is the newest installment in the Cambridge Critical Guides series, which aims to "serv[e] the twin tasks of introduction and exploration" (1). Its fourteen chapters skew towards the latter task; they present cutting-edge research by scholars at various stages of their careers on some central themes and arguments of the first Critique. Different chapters can be fruitfully compared with regard to both content and general approach. On the latter point, for example, some authors are particularly concerned to view Kant's ideas against the background of his predecessors' positions, while others focus on the internal dynamics of his views, and yet others underscore the relationship between his ideas. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News