The Great Unread

What distinguishes a celebrated yet largely unread classic from an enduringly popular classic? The answer hinges on a fraught term: universality…
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What distinguishes a celebrated yet largely unread classic from an enduringly popular classic? The answer hinges on a fraught term: universality… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

E.O. Wilson’s vision

At 85, E.O. Wilson is still thinking big. He wants to prevent a mass-extinction crisis. How? By handing over half the planet to other species…
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At 85, E.O. Wilson is still thinking big. He wants to prevent a mass-extinction crisis. How? By handing over half the planet to other species… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Imaginal Politics: Images Beyond Imagination and the Imaginary

2014.08.40 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Chiara Bottici, Imaginal Politics: Images Beyond Imagination and the Imaginary, Columbia University Press, 2014, 258pp., $50.00
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2014.08.40 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Chiara Bottici, Imaginal Politics: Images Beyond Imagination and the Imaginary, Columbia University Press, 2014, 258pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780231157780. Reviewed by Laura Hengehold, Case Western Reserve University Situations in which citizens deliberate and act are framed by images as well as words. These images may be perceptual, photographic or moving video; they may be conscious fantasies, and they may involve unconscious expectations or hopes. Arendt suggested that Kant's unwritten political philosophy was contained in passages from the Critique of Judgment dealing with aesthetic judgment's capacity to mobilize an ideal common sense on the world's appearance, regardless of empirical disagreements between observers. But toward the end of her life, Arendt herself became increasingly focused on the role of imagination in judgment, rather than in action. Chiara Bottici takes up Arendt's attempt to rework. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

From Individual to Collective Intentionality: New Essays

2014.08.39 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sara Rachel Chant, Frank Hindriks, and Gerhard Preyer (eds.), From Individual to Collective Intentionality: New Essays, Oxford
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2014.08.39 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Sara Rachel Chant, Frank Hindriks, and Gerhard Preyer (eds.), From Individual to Collective Intentionality: New Essays, Oxford University Press, 2014, 225pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199936502. Reviewed by Jennifer Lackey, Northwestern University We attribute intentions to both individuals and to collective entities. Just as individuals do, groups might intend to break their promises or to honor their agreements or to draft a proposal. Moreover, our holding groups responsible for their actions often turns on our ability to properly attribute intentions to them, so there is a great deal at stake here. But how we understand these phenomena, and their relationship to one another, is far from straightforward. Can groups, for instance, have intentions that no individual member has? Is the rationality of groups wholly determined by the rationality of their members? How can collective entities perform actions when. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Events

[Revised entry by Roberto Casati and Achille Varzi on August 27, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Smiles, walks, dances, weddings, explosions, hiccups, hand-waves, arrivals and
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[Revised entry by Roberto Casati and Achille Varzi on August 27, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Smiles, walks, dances, weddings, explosions, hiccups, hand-waves, arrivals and departures, births and deaths, thunder and lightning: the variety of the world seems to lie not only in the assortment of its ordinary citizens - animals and physical objects, and perhaps...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Justice, Inequality, and Health

[Revised entry by Gopal Sreenivasan on August 27, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Among American men, there is a 15.4 year difference in life expectancy between Asians and high-risk
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[Revised entry by Gopal Sreenivasan on August 27, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Among American men, there is a 15.4 year difference in life expectancy between Asians and high-risk urban blacks, where these groups constitute, respectively, the best-off and worst-off groups of men in the 'eight Americas' analysis of mortality in the United States by Murray and colleagues (2006). Among American women, the corresponding difference in life expectancy is 12.8 years,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Terraforming Ethics

J’atorg struggled along on his motile pods, wheezing badly as his air sacs fought with the new air. He cursed the humans, invoking the gods of his people. Reflecting, he cursed the humans by
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J’atorg struggled along on his motile pods, wheezing badly as his air sacs fought with the new air. He cursed the humans, invoking the gods of his people. Reflecting, he cursed the humans by invoking their gods. The gods of his people had proven weak: the bipeds had come and were transforming his world into an environment more suitable for themselves, showing their gods were stronger. The humans said it would take a long time for the world to fully change, but J’atorg could already see, taste and smell the differences. He did not know who he hated more: the hard-eyed humans who were destroying his world or the soft-eyed humans who poured forth words about “rights”, “morality” and “lawsuits” while urging patience. He knew that his people would die, aside from those the humans kept as curiosities or preserved to assuage their conscience with cruel pity. English: Terraforming (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Terraforming has long been a staple in science fiction, though there has been some. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Staying Alive: Personal Identity, Practical Concerns, and the Unity of a Life

2014.08.38 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Marya Schechtman, Staying Alive: Personal Identity, Practical Concerns, and the Unity of a Life, Oxford University Press, 2014,
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2014.08.38 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Marya Schechtman, Staying Alive: Personal Identity, Practical Concerns, and the Unity of a Life, Oxford University Press, 2014, 214pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199684878. Reviewed by Raymond Martin, Union College How at this late date in the discussion within contemporary analytic philosophy of personhood and personal identity can one make a significant new contribution to our understanding of both? One way, surely, is by shifting the focus away from those aspects of the debate that have been overworked in the literature and putting it onto issues that have not gotten the attention they deserve. But how to do that? In this valuable addition to the literature on personhood and personal identity Marya Schechtman may have found a way. It is by moving the analytic debate in a more empirical direction. This is by no means all she does in this important new book (I'll return to some of the rest of it in a... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Who Is Elena Ferrante?

Who Is Elena Ferrante? The writer has never been interviewed in person, perhaps never even photographed. For her, celebrity is a choice, not an obligation…
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Who Is Elena Ferrante? The writer has never been interviewed in person, perhaps never even photographed. For her, celebrity is a choice, not an obligation… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Bourgeois Eric Hobsbawm

Yes, Eric Hobsbawm was a persistent and unabashed communist. But he was also profoundly bourgeois, of a distinctly Jewish sort…
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Yes, Eric Hobsbawm was a persistent and unabashed communist. But he was also profoundly bourgeois, of a distinctly Jewish sort… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily