UnTrumpable

View image | gettyimages.com When Trump first threw his hair into the ring, many pundits and comedians assumed his campaign would be a short-lived (but extremely funny) misadventure in
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View image | gettyimages.com When Trump first threw his hair into the ring, many pundits and comedians assumed his campaign would be a short-lived (but extremely funny) misadventure in political theater. However, Trump has not only managed to stay in the fight, he seems to be winning. As this is being written Donald Trump enjoys a commanding lead over the other Republican candidates. He is even closing on the Democrats’ presumed nominee, Hilary Clinton. While the specifics of Trump’s adventures are not particularly philosophical, his success does provide a foundation for a discussion of the state of American politics. To be honest, though, I just want to write about Trump. Like everyone else. As a general rule, when a serious political candidate engages in gaffes (especially involving race or gender), the result is often a career ending injury. At the very least, the politician’s handlers get him (or her) into damage control: there are walk backs, clarifications, insincere apologies. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

John Cook Wilson

[Revised entry by Mathieu Marion on August 31, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] John Cook Wilson (1849 - 1915) was Wykeham Professor of Logic at New College, Oxford and the founder of
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[Revised entry by Mathieu Marion on August 31, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] John Cook Wilson (1849 - 1915) was Wykeham Professor of Logic at New College, Oxford and the founder of 'Oxford Realism', a philosophical movement that flourished at Oxford during the first decades of the 20th century. Although trained as a classicist and a mathematician, his most important contribution was to the theory of knowledge, where he argued that knowledge is factive and not definable in terms of belief, and he criticized 'hybrid' and...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Kant and Colonialism: Historical and Critical Perspectives

2015.08.42 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Katrin Flikschuh and Lea Ypi (eds.), Kant and Colonialism: Historical and Critical Perspectives, Oxford University Press, 2014,
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2015.08.42 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Katrin Flikschuh and Lea Ypi (eds.), Kant and Colonialism: Historical and Critical Perspectives, Oxford University Press, 2014, 254pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 0199669627. Reviewed by Thomas Khurana, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main Although colonialism is only a marginal topic in Kant's writings, his remarks on the legitimacy or illegitimacy of colonial practices have naturally attracted much attention. As Kant is a main representative of enlightenment thinking and a herald of emancipatory theory, any putative endorsement or critique of colonialism on his part would seem to have far reaching implications: Kant's stance, whatever it turns out to be, could be understood as representative of the ways in which Western Enlightenment might be complicit with or, on the contrary, offer a resource for overcoming colonial oppression. This volume does not address the broader question of the general relation of. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

&ldquo;Men of high intelligence and sensibility,&rdquo; it was said, tended to be <strong>enchanted by Hannah Arendt</strong>. Hans Morgenthau was no exception

&amp;ldquo;Men of high intelligence and sensibility,&amp;rdquo; it was said, tended to be enchanted by Hannah Arendt. Hans Morgenthau was no
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“Men of high intelligence and sensibility,” it was said, tended to be enchanted by Hannah Arendt. Hans Morgenthau was no exception

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Squeezing, falsifying, accentuating, stiffening: Clothing has always been about artifice. And <strong>choosing what we wear</strong> has never been rational

Squeezing, falsifying, accentuating, stiffening: Clothing has always been about artifice. And choosing what we wear has never been
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Squeezing, falsifying, accentuating, stiffening: Clothing has always been about artifice. And choosing what we wear has never been rational

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Gottlob Frege: Basic Laws of Arithmetic

2015.08.41 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gottlob Frege,&#160;Gottlob Frege: Basic Laws of Arithmetic, Philip A. Ebert and Marcus Rossberg (eds., trs.), Oxford University
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2015.08.41 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gottlob Frege, Gottlob Frege: Basic Laws of Arithmetic, Philip A. Ebert and Marcus Rossberg (eds., trs.), Oxford University Press, 2013, 680pp., $110.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199281749. Reviewed by Erich H. Reck, University of California at Riverside Several works by Gottlob Frege have played the role of canonical texts within English-speaking philosophy for decades, especially "On Sense and Reference", available in English since 1948, The Foundations of Arithmetic, since 1950, and Begriffsschrift, since 1967.[1] (In German: "Über Sinn und Bedeutung", originally published in 1891, Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik, 1884, and Begriffsschrift, 1879). However, the work generally seen as Frege's magnum opus and meant to be his crowning achievement -- Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (Vols. 1-2) -- has been available in translation only in the form of excerpts so far, mostly in The Basic Laws of Arithmetic (M. Furth, ed., tr.,. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Idealism

[New Entry by Paul Guyer and Rolf-Peter Horstmann on August 30, 2015.] This entry discusses philosophical idealism as a movement chiefly in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, although
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[New Entry by Paul Guyer and Rolf-Peter Horstmann on August 30, 2015.] This entry discusses philosophical idealism as a movement chiefly in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, although anticipated by certain aspects of seventeenth century philosophy. It examines the relationship between epistemological idealism (the view that the contents of human knowledge are ineluctably determined by the structure of human thought) and ontological idealism (the view that epistemological idealism delivers truth because reality itself is a form of thought and human thought participates in it). After discussing precursors, the entry focuses on the eighteenth-century...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Discrimination

[Revised entry by Andrew Altman on August 30, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Discrimination is prohibited by six of the core international human rights documents. The vast majority of
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[Revised entry by Andrew Altman on August 30, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Discrimination is prohibited by six of the core international human rights documents. The vast majority of the world's states have constitutional or statutory provisions outlawing discrimination. (Osin and Porat 2005) And most philosophical, political, and legal discussions of discrimination proceed on the premise that discrimination is morally wrong and, in a wide range of cases, ought to be legally prohibited. However, co-existing with this impressive...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Idealism Without God: a must-read paper!

... by the brilliant Helen Yetter-Chappell,&amp;nbsp;[forthcoming in T. Goldschmidt &amp;amp; K. Pearce (eds.)&amp;nbsp;Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics, Oxford University Press,]PDF pre-print available
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... by the brilliant Helen Yetter-Chappell, [forthcoming in T. Goldschmidt & K. Pearce (eds.) Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics, Oxford University Press,]PDF pre-print available here.I may be a tad biased, but I can't think of a more creative, ambitious, and interesting paper than Helen's 'Idealism Without God', which manages to improve upon Berkeley's original view in significant respects (especially regarding the nature of perception) whilst depending upon less controversial theoretical resources (as indicated by the title).  It's cool stuff.  A prominent philosopher of mind even declared it, "the coolest metaphysical view ever!"  It should especially delight those who worry that philosophers these days too often lose sight of the "big issues".The paper's upshot:Contemporary philosophers are overwhelmingly materialists (at least about the domain of physical objects). I think it’s unfortunate that this view is taken for granted, as idealism both has. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

How well do you know Lao Tzu? [quiz]

This August we are featuring Lao Tzu, the legendary Chinese thinker and founder of Taoism, as Philosopher of the Month. He is best known as the author of the classic ‘Tao Te Ching’ (‘The Book of the
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This August, we’re featuring Lao Tzu as our Philosopher of the Month. An ancient Chinese philosopher and poet, Lao Tzu is a legendary figure in Taoism. His major work, the Tao Te Ching, is one of the most significant treatises in Chinese cosmogony (narratives about the origins of the universe) – in which Lao Tzu explains his ideas by way of paradox, analogy, ancient sayings, repetition, rhyme and rhythm. He is a central figure in Chinese culture, revered by turns as a deity, historical forbear, politician, intellectual, and religious thinker. Do you know what ‘Tao’ really means, in which dynasty Lao Tzu is believed to have been born, or even how to spell his name(s)? Featured Image Credit: ‘China Sunset Hongkong Harbour’, Photo by L-evate, CC0 Public Domain via Pixabay. The post How well do you know Lao Tzu? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesPhilosopher of the month: Lao TzuHow well do you know Jacques. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy