Addiction and Weakness of Will

2014.07. : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Lubomira Radoilska, Addiction and Weakness of Will, Oxford University Press, 2013, 148pp., $59.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780199641963.
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2014.07. : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Lubomira Radoilska, Addiction and Weakness of Will, Oxford University Press, 2013, 148pp., $59.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780199641963. Reviewed by Neil Levy, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health/Oxford Centre for Neuroethics This book is published in Oxford University Press's International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry series, which may lead the reader to expect it to be concerned with addiction as a psychiatric problem and to engage with the large body of clinical and empirical work on the topic. That expectation would be disappointed: Lubomira Radoilska is interested in addiction only insofar as it serves to illustrate problems arising when agents fail to act as they judge they ought. Indeed, there is relatively little discussion of addiction in the book, and when it does appear it is in the guise of literary accounts, which almost certainly depart significantly from the reality of addiction. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Kingdom of William T. Vollmann

Sex workers, snipers, silver-gelatin photos: The creepy, fascinating, and remarkably prolific life of William T. Vollmann…
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Sex workers, snipers, silver-gelatin photos: The creepy, fascinating, and remarkably prolific life of William T. Vollmann… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Is death insignificant?

The swatting of a fly – so common, so insignificant – demonstrates that we don’t know what to think about death, whether a fly’s or our own…
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The swatting of a fly – so common, so insignificant – demonstrates that we don’t know what to think about death, whether a fly’s or our own… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Roman Jokers

Elizabethans joked about venereal disease. Romans laughed at bald men. The history of humor is wildly inconsistent about what’s funny…
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Elizabethans joked about venereal disease. Romans laughed at bald men. The history of humor is wildly inconsistent about what’s funny… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Violence: Thinking Without Banisters

2014.07.33 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard J. Bernstein, Violence: Thinking Without Banisters, Polity, 2013, 228pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745670645. Reviewed
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2014.07.33 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard J. Bernstein, Violence: Thinking Without Banisters, Polity, 2013, 228pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745670645. Reviewed by Seyla Benhabib, Yale University Violence has accompanied human culture from its earliest beginnings, and representations of violence in art, narrative and song are ubiquitous. Yet it is only in certain periods that violence emerges as a major preoccupation of political thinkers: Machiavelli's The Prince (1532); Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France (1820), Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel (In Stahlgewittern, 1924) and Georges Sorel's Réflexions sur la Violence (1908) are major works that have explored violence in different periods. Why has violence resurfaced in contemporary thought in the first decades of the twenty-first century? Richard Bernstein observes that We live in a time when we are overwhelmed with talk, writing, and especially images of violence. Whether. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Ethics Symposium: Experiment and Intuition in Ethics

One of the greatest issues of Ethics has recently been published: Vol. 124, No. 4 (a Symposium on Experiment and Intuition in Ethics). Contents include: Introduction Henry S. Richardson Principles
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One of the greatest issues of Ethics has recently been published: Vol. 124, No. 4 (a Symposium on Experiment and Intuition in Ethics). Contents include:IntroductionHenry S. RichardsonPrinciples and Intuitions in Ethics: Historical and Contemporary PerspectivesDavid O. BrinkBeyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive (Neuro)Science Matters for EthicsJoshua D. GreeneProcess Debunking and EthicsShaun NicholsAny Animal Whatever? Harmful Battery and Its Elements as Building Blocks of Moral CognitionJohn MikhailIntuition and EmotionJonathan DancyThe Affective Dog and Its Rational Tale: Intuition and AttunementPeter RailtonExperiments In Vivo, In Vitro, and In Cathedra Sarah BussAnd there's more! There will soon be a discussion of Railton's paper over at PEA Soup (Aug. 4-6) with an introduction by the great Bryce Huebner. Peter's paper is available free for the occasion, but for a limited time I believe. What a way to end the summer!

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

Question about Death, Ethics - Allen Stairs responds

If you allow someone to die when you are capable of saving they life, but do not kill them directly, are you a murderer? Response from: Allen Stairs In both the legal and the familiar sense of
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If you allow someone to die when you are capable of saving they life, but do not kill them directly, are you a murderer? Response from: Allen Stairs In both the legal and the familiar sense of the word "murderer," the answer is no. You certainly wouldn't be charged with murder in a case like this, and if you were, successfully arguing that you didn't actually kill the person but merely allowed them to die would lead to a "not guilty" verdict. Murder, as it's usually understood, is unlawful killing or, in the non-legal sense, morally unjustified killing.That said, someone might argue that if you're in a position to save someone's life and you don't, then you're guilty of something just as bad as murder. No doubt we can come up with hypothetical cases where this might be so. For instance: Alex intends to kill Bob; he's got the means and the will. But on his way to do the deed, he discovers Bob unconscious and bleeding by the side of the road. Suppose it's clear that Alex could save. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Museum and solitude

What do we want when confronting great art? Solitude, contemplation, silence – all of which are inhibited, even prohibited, in most museums…
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What do we want when confronting great art? Solitude, contemplation, silence – all of which are inhibited, even prohibited, in most museums… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Visions of Science

Introduced in 1833, the term “scientist” had grubby connotations. Natural philosophers thought deeply and wrote elegantly, scientists were data crunchers…
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Introduced in 1833, the term “scientist” had grubby connotations. Natural philosophers thought deeply and wrote elegantly, scientists were data crunchers… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

History of Autocorrect

In this age of fat fingers on tiny touchscreens, autocorrect is a necessity. Whom can we thank for this innovation? A man identified as Bill Vaginal…
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In this age of fat fingers on tiny touchscreens, autocorrect is a necessity. Whom can we thank for this innovation? A man identified as Bill Vaginal… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily