<strong>Speak, butterfly</strong>. How the intricate structures of <em>Pnin</em>, <em>Lolita</em>, and <em>Pale Fire</em> were inspired by Nabokov's dissections of butterfly genitalia

Speak, butterfly. How the intricate structures of Pnin, Lolita, and Pale Fire were inspired by Nabokov&#39;s dissections of butterfly
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Speak, butterfly. How the intricate structures of Pnin, Lolita, and Pale Fire were inspired by Nabokov's dissections of butterfly genitalia

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Want to <strong>eat like Alfred Hitchcock</strong>? Learn what Joan Crawford thrived on, apart from anger, spite, and bile? Now there's a book for that

Want to eat like Alfred Hitchcock? Learn what Joan Crawford thrived on, apart from anger, spite, and bile? Now there&#39;s a book for
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Want to eat like Alfred Hitchcock? Learn what Joan Crawford thrived on, apart from anger, spite, and bile? Now there's a book for that

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Emily Dickinson</strong> was known in her own time as a naturalist and botanist. Her gardens provided her with tropes, narratives, and imagery

Emily Dickinson was known in her own time as a naturalist and botanist. Her gardens provided her with tropes, narratives, and
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Emily Dickinson was known in her own time as a naturalist and botanist. Her gardens provided her with tropes, narratives, and imagery

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Inborn Knowledge: The Mystery Within

2016.05.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Colin McGinn, Inborn Knowledge: The Mystery Within, MIT Press, 2015, 137pp., $32.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262029391. Reviewed by
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2016.05.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Colin McGinn, Inborn Knowledge: The Mystery Within, MIT Press, 2015, 137pp., $32.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262029391. Reviewed by Peter Carruthers, University of Maryland This book is mercifully short (just 102 smallish pages of main text). My review will attempt to match it for brevity. The book is framed around the contrast between Lockean empiricism and Cartesian nativism. Locke held that the contents of the mind are more-or-less veridically impressed upon it from without. McGinn devotes considerable time to arguing that this is untenable, on a variety of grounds. The mind is not, and cannot be, a blank slate. It has structure, resulting from the unfolding of a genetic program. But of course no contemporary empiricist denies this. Almost everyone now allows that our sensory systems embody implicit knowledge of the structure of the world. Indeed Fodor (1981, 2008), whose nativism is in many respects even more. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Antibiotics & the Cost of Agriculture

Modern agriculture does deserve considerable praise for the good that it does. Food is plentiful, relatively cheap and easy to acquire. Instead of having to struggle with raising crops and livestock
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Modern agriculture does deserve considerable praise for the good that it does. Food is plentiful, relatively cheap and easy to acquire. Instead of having to struggle with raising crops and livestock or hunting and gathering, I can simply drive to the supermarket and stock up with the food I need to not die. However, as with all things, there is a price. The modern agricultural complex is now highly centralized and industrialized, which does have its advantages and disadvantages. There are also the harms of specific, chosen practices aimed at maximizing profits. While there are many ways to maximize profits, two common ones are to pay the lowest wages possible (which the agricultural industry does—and not just to the migrant laborers, but to the ranchers and farmers) and to shift the costs to others. I will look, briefly, at one area of cost shifting: the widespread use of antibiotics in meat production. Embed from Getty Images While most people think of antibiotics as a means of. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

The Conspiracy of Theories

Stephen Brewer stealthily records a dialogue in which Freya argues that conspiracy theories are illogical, but Orin is not so
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Stephen Brewer stealthily records a dialogue in which Freya argues that conspiracy theories are illogical, but Orin is not so sure.

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News source: Philosophy Now

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)

Alistair MacFarlane reviews the phenomenal life of a wilful
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Alistair MacFarlane reviews the phenomenal life of a wilful mind.

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News source: Philosophy Now

Scrutinising Material Objects

Raymond Tallis sees that the simple everyday world of material objects is not so simple after
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Raymond Tallis sees that the simple everyday world of material objects is not so simple after all.

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News source: Philosophy Now

Hilary Putnam (1926-2016)

Maria Baghramian remembers her long-standing mentor and
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Maria Baghramian remembers her long-standing mentor and friend.

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News source: Philosophy Now

The Last Supper

Terri Murray watches a liberal death squad in operation. (Warning: Contains
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Terri Murray watches a liberal death squad in operation. (Warning: Contains spoilers!)

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News source: Philosophy Now