Philosophy, Sophistry, Antiphilosophy: Badiou's Dispute with Lyotard

2016.02.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew R. McLennan, Philosophy, Sophistry, Antiphilosophy: Badiou's Dispute with Lyotard, Bloomsbury, 2015, 150pp., $112.00
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2016.02.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew R. McLennan, Philosophy, Sophistry, Antiphilosophy: Badiou's Dispute with Lyotard, Bloomsbury, 2015, 150pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781472574169. Reviewed by James Williams, Deakin University They say too many books are written. I'm not so sure. So long as a book is read by someone at some time. Even if it is not read, like a redemptive private diary which never goes beyond a locked drawer, the process of writing can be enough. I am sure that some books need to be written. Academia is a propitious place for them because the quest for explanations and knowledge replaces faulty descriptions, corrects arguments and fills gaps in understanding. It does not matter how vast the fault or small the breach, when a book serves to remedy them, it was needed. This book was necessary. It is the first book on the encounters, disputes, agreements and commentaries bringing Jean-François Lyotard and Alain... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

<strong>Authenticity and art</strong>. When it&rsquo;s possible to create visually perfect reproductions of famous works, will we discard the originals, or celebrate them anew?

Authenticity and art. When it&amp;rsquo;s possible to create visually perfect reproductions of famous works, will we discard the originals, or celebrate them
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Authenticity and art. When it’s possible to create visually perfect reproductions of famous works, will we discard the originals, or celebrate them anew?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>The toll of technology</strong>. We're engaged in &ldquo;a race to the bottom of the brain stem.&rdquo; Rewards go to those companies that keep us mindlessly attentive

The toll of technology. We&#39;re engaged in &amp;ldquo;a race to the bottom of the brain stem.&amp;rdquo; Rewards go to those companies that keep us mindlessly
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The toll of technology. We're engaged in “a race to the bottom of the brain stem.” Rewards go to those companies that keep us mindlessly attentive

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Thinking about Oneself: From Nonconceptual Content to the Concept of a Self

2016.02.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kristina Musholt, Thinking about Oneself: From Nonconceptual Content to the Concept of a Self, MIT Press, 2015, 210pp., $40.00
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2016.02.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kristina Musholt, Thinking about Oneself: From Nonconceptual Content to the Concept of a Self, MIT Press, 2015, 210pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262029209. Reviewed by Dan Zahavi, University of Copenhagen Kristina Musholt sets out to offer an account of self-consciousness that is neither circular nor dependent upon irreducible, unanalyzable elements. Although she is committed to the kind of naturalism that encourages the exchange between philosophy and empirical science, and although her main interlocutors are figures in analytic philosophy of mind and language such as Wittgenstein, Sydney Shoemaker, Héctor-Neri Castañeda, Anscombe, John Perry, and Gareth Evans, her very setup reveals the influence of an additional source of inspiration, namely German Idealism. As Dieter Henrich points out in his 1967 essay "Fichte's ursprüngliche Einsicht", one of Fichte's enduring insights is that any attempt to conceive of. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Dutch Book Arguments

[Revised entry by Susan Vineberg on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The Dutch Book argument (DBA) for probabilism (namely the view that an agent&#39;s degrees of belief should
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[Revised entry by Susan Vineberg on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The Dutch Book argument (DBA) for probabilism (namely the view that an agent's degrees of belief should satisfy the axioms of probability) traces to Ramsey's work in "Truth and Probability". He mentioned only in passing that an agent who violates the probability axioms would be vulnerable to having a book made against him and this has led to considerable debate and confusion both about exactly what Ramsey intended to show and about if, and how, a cogent version of the argument can be given. The basic...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Turing Test

[Revised entry by Graham Oppy and David Dowe on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The phrase &quot;The Turing Test&quot; is most properly used to refer to a proposal made by Turing
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[Revised entry by Graham Oppy and David Dowe on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The phrase "The Turing Test" is most properly used to refer to a proposal made by Turing (1950) as a way of dealing with the question whether machines can think. According to Turing, the question whether machines can think is itself "too meaningless" to deserve discussion (442). However, if we consider the more precise - and somehow related - question whether a digital computer can do well in a certain kind of game that Turing describes...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Frame Problem

[Revised entry by Murray Shanahan on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] To most AI researchers, the frame problem is the challenge of representing the effects of action in
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[Revised entry by Murray Shanahan on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] To most AI researchers, the frame problem is the challenge of representing the effects of action in logic without having to represent explicitly a large number of intuitively obvious non-effects. But to many philosophers, the AI researchers' frame problem is suggestive of wider epistemological issues. Is it possible, in principle, to limit the scope of the reasoning required to derive the consequences of an action? And, more generally, how do we account for our apparent ability...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Dewey's Aesthetics

[Revised entry by Tom Leddy on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] John Dewey is well known for his work in logic, scientific inquiry, and philosophy of education. His fame is
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[Revised entry by Tom Leddy on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] John Dewey is well known for his work in logic, scientific inquiry, and philosophy of education. His fame is based largely on his membership in the school of American Pragmatists of which Charles Sanders Peirce and William James were the leading early figures. He has also had a great deal of influence in aesthetics and the philosophy of art. His work Art as Experience (1934) is regarded by many as one of the most important contributions to this area in the 20th century. Yet it is not as widely discussed...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Definition of Morality

[Revised entry by Bernard Gert and Joshua Gert on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The topic of this entry is not - at least directly - moral theory; rather, it is the
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[Revised entry by Bernard Gert and Joshua Gert on February 8, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The topic of this entry is not - at least directly - moral theory; rather, it is the definition of morality. Moral theories are large and complex things; definitions are not. The question of the definition of morality is the question of identifying the target of moral theorizing. Identifying this target enables us to see different moral theories as attempting to capture the very same thing. In this way, the distinction between a definition of morality and a moral theory parallels the distinction John Rawls...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Form vs. Matter

[New Entry by Thomas Ainsworth on February 8, 2016.] Aristotle famously contends that every physical object is a compound of matter and form. This doctrine has been dubbed &quot;hylomorphism&quot;, a
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[New Entry by Thomas Ainsworth on February 8, 2016.] Aristotle famously contends that every physical object is a compound of matter and form. This doctrine has been dubbed "hylomorphism", a portmanteau of the Greek words for matter (hule) and form (eidos or morphe). Highly influential in the development of Medieval philosophy, Aristotle's hylomorphism has also enjoyed something of a renaissance in contemporary metaphysics....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy