<strong>The great kvetch</strong> of the English department: Enrollments are down because students care only about money.&nbsp;But is the problem students or their professors?

The great kvetch of the English department: Enrollments are down because students care only about money.&amp;nbsp;But is the problem students or their
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The great kvetch of the English department: Enrollments are down because students care only about money. But is the problem students or their professors?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Openness and its discontents</strong>. Participation, transparency, collaboration: The great promises of the Internet aren't what they seem

Openness and its discontents. Participation, transparency, collaboration: The great promises of the Internet aren&#39;t what they
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Openness and its discontents. Participation, transparency, collaboration: The great promises of the Internet aren't what they seem

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The life of an artist isn't easels, turpentine, and raffia-wrapped Chianti bottles so much as struggle and poverty. <strong>Making art is work</strong>, not a privilege

The life of an artist isn&#39;t easels, turpentine, and raffia-wrapped Chianti bottles so much as struggle and poverty. Making art is work, not a
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The life of an artist isn't easels, turpentine, and raffia-wrapped Chianti bottles so much as struggle and poverty. Making art is work, not a privilege

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Computability in Europe (CiE) 2015

Conference Name: Computability in Europe (CiE) 2015 Conference Dates: June 29 - July 3, 2015 ​Submission Deadline: ​January 21, 2015 ​Location: ​Bucharest, Romania Website:
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Conference Name: Computability in Europe (CiE) 2015 Conference Dates: June 29 - July 3, 2015 ​Submission Deadline: ​January 21, 2015 ​Location: ​Bucharest, Romania Website: http://fmi.unibuc.ro/CiE2015/ Flyer: CiE 2015

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News source: Events

Robot Love I: Other Minds

View image &amp;#124; gettyimages.com Thanks to improvements in medicine humans are living longer and can be kept alive well past the point at which they would naturally die. On the plus side, longer
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View image | gettyimages.com Thanks to improvements in medicine humans are living longer and can be kept alive well past the point at which they would naturally die. On the plus side, longer life is generally (but not always) good. On the downside, this longer lifespan and medical intervention mean that people will often need extensive care in their old age. This care can be a considerable burden on the caregivers. Not surprisingly, there has been an effort to develop a technological solution to this problem, specifically companion robots that serve as caregivers. While the technology is currently fairly crude, there is clearly great potential here and there are numerous advantages to effective robot caregivers. The most obvious are that robot caregivers do not get tired, do not get depressed, do not get angry, and do not have any other responsibilities. As such, they can be ideal 24/7/365 caregivers. This makes them superior in many ways to human caregivers who get tired, get. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Cultivating Virtue: Perspectives from Philosophy, Theology, and Psychology

2015.07.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nancy E. Snow (ed.),&#160;Cultivating Virtue: Perspectives from Philosophy, Theology, and Psychology, Oxford University Press, 2015,
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2015.07.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nancy E. Snow (ed.), Cultivating Virtue: Perspectives from Philosophy, Theology, and Psychology, Oxford University Press, 2015, 349pp., $35.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780199967445. Reviewed by Erica Lucast Stonestreet, College of St. Benedict and St. John's University The motivation for this volume is to call attention to the development and cultivation of virtue, and to stimulate further work on this relatively neglected aspect of virtue ethics. To this end, Nancy Snow has collected work from philosophical, theological, and psychological angles, representing some non-Western as well as major Western traditions. The result is a set of essays that gives a sense of historical and current understandings of virtue development, raises worthwhile questions, and points out directions for future research. Some of the pieces should prove extremely important in these respects. Three of the most important themes that emerge are. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Experiences of Depression: A Study in Phenomenology

2015.07.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew Ratcliffe,&#160;Experiences of Depression:&#160;A Study in Phenomenology, Oxford University Press, 2015, 318pp., $59.95 (pbk), ISBN
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2015.07.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew Ratcliffe, Experiences of Depression: A Study in Phenomenology, Oxford University Press, 2015, 318pp., $59.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780199608973. Reviewed by Katherine Withy, Georgetown University This volume collects Matthew Ratcliffe's work from the last five years on depression and existential feeling, offering a rich and compelling phenomenological interpretation of the variety and unity of experiences of depression. Ratcliffe's interpretation is informed by and in dialogue with not only historical and contemporary phenomenology, but also philosophy of mind and philosophy of emotion, as well as psychiatry and psychology. The book is an important contribution to phenomenology in general and to the phenomenology of mood disorder in particular, and it provides those who suffer from depression -- as well as those who care for them -- a powerful new way to understand and express their experiences. The primary. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Was the ancient world a <strong>hotbed of esotericism</strong>, in which philosophers self-censored, smuggling subversive ideas between the lines? Not exactly&nbsp;

Was the ancient world a hotbed of esotericism, in which philosophers self-censored, smuggling subversive ideas between the lines? Not
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Was the ancient world a hotbed of esotericism, in which philosophers self-censored, smuggling subversive ideas between the lines? Not exactly 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The midcentury male writer: angry, bighearted, loving, hungry for fame, fiercely competitive, tragic, drink-soaked. <strong>William Styron</strong> knew all too well&nbsp;

The midcentury male writer: angry, bighearted, loving, hungry for fame, fiercely competitive, tragic, drink-soaked. William Styron knew all too
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The midcentury male writer: angry, bighearted, loving, hungry for fame, fiercely competitive, tragic, drink-soaked. William Styron knew all too well 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

We live in the hyperpresent, obsessed by the instantaneous. So why are we enthralled with <strong>Deep History</strong> and its all-encompassing purview?

We live in the hyperpresent, obsessed by the instantaneous. So why are we enthralled with Deep History and its all-encompassing
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We live in the hyperpresent, obsessed by the instantaneous. So why are we enthralled with Deep History and its all-encompassing purview?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily