Debating Brain Drain: May Governments Restrict Emigration?

2015.05.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gillian Brock and Michael Blake, Debating Brain Drain: May Governments Restrict Emigration?, Oxford University Press, 2015,
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2015.05.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gillian Brock and Michael Blake, Debating Brain Drain: May Governments Restrict Emigration?, Oxford University Press, 2015, 304pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780199315628. Reviewed by Avery Kolers, University of Louisville Supposedly, transnational migration benefits all sides. The migrant exercises her freedom to move and pursues her conception of the good. The receiving country gets the human-capital boost. The global economy benefits from the more efficient deployment of resources. The source country reduces unemployment by one, while typically benefiting from remissions sent 'home' by the migrant. There is plenty of empirical research that bears all this out, and academic philosophers have principally addressed transnational migration under the assumption that this picture is more or less accurate. At its extreme this orientation leads to a moral ultimatum facing wealthy countries: they may either open their. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Phenomenology Explained: From Experience to Insight

2015.05.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Detmer, Phenomenology Explained: From Experience to Insight, Open Court, 2013, 212pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN
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2015.05.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Detmer, Phenomenology Explained: From Experience to Insight, Open Court, 2013, 212pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780812697971. Reviewed by Michael R. Kelly, University of San Diego David Detmer's book commendably strains to make clear and accessible to the novice phenomenology's central mission, method, and concepts. Analytically and continentally trained philosophers should find his philosophical style approachable. And with some significant caveats, which will become clear below, I think that instructors would find helpful some of Detmer's ways of presenting the philosophical context surrounding phenomenology's emergence, its distinctive and cogent alternatives to traditional philosophical problems, and certain of its important methodological claims. A quick glance at the title of each of the work's eight sections tells one a good deal: Introduction; Early Husserl; Middle Husserl; Late Husserl; Ethics;. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Gen X-ers are independent and productive. Millennials don't buy cars. Says who? It's time to abandon the hopelessly arbitrary <strong>pseudoscience of generational analysis</strong>

Gen X-ers are independent and productive. Millennials don&#39;t buy cars. Says who? It&#39;s time to abandon the hopelessly arbitrary pseudoscience of generational
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Gen X-ers are independent and productive. Millennials don't buy cars. Says who? It's time to abandon the hopelessly arbitrary pseudoscience of generational analysis

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

From 1948 to 1960, <strong>Nabokov</strong> wrote parts of <em>Lolita</em>, <em>Pnin,</em> and <em>Speak, Memory</em>. He was a writer transformed &ndash; an American, no longer a European aesthete

From 1948 to 1960, Nabokov wrote parts of Lolita, Pnin, and Speak, Memory. He was a writer transformed &amp;ndash; an American, no longer a European
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From 1948 to 1960, Nabokov wrote parts of Lolita, Pnin, and Speak, Memory. He was a writer transformed – an American, no longer a European aesthete

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

According to its founder, <strong>Wikipedia</strong> is the "sum of all human knowledge." More accurate to say the sum of all male knowledge; 91 percent of editors are men. It shows&nbsp;

According to its founder, Wikipedia is the &quot;sum of all human knowledge.&quot; More accurate to say the sum of all male knowledge; 91 percent of editors are men. It
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According to its founder, Wikipedia is the "sum of all human knowledge." More accurate to say the sum of all male knowledge; 91 percent of editors are men. It shows 

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Correspondence Theory of Truth

[Revised entry by Marian David on May 28, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Narrowly speaking, the correspondence theory of truth is the view that truth is correspondence to, or with, a
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[Revised entry by Marian David on May 28, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Narrowly speaking, the correspondence theory of truth is the view that truth is correspondence to, or with, a fact - a view that was advocated by Russell and Moore early in the 20th century. But the label is usually applied much more broadly to any view explicitly embracing the idea that truth consists in a relation to reality, i.e., that truth is a relational property involving a characteristic relation (to be specified) to some portion of reality (to be...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Christian von Ehrenfels

[New Entry by Robin Rollinger and Carlo Ierna on May 28, 2015.] Christian von Ehrenfels (b. June 20, 1859, d. September 8, 1932) was an Austrian philosopher and psychologist from the school of Franz
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[New Entry by Robin Rollinger and Carlo Ierna on May 28, 2015.] Christian von Ehrenfels (b. June 20, 1859, d. September 8, 1932) was an Austrian philosopher and psychologist from the school of Franz Brentano. He proved himself to be a highly independent and diverse thinker by formulating the notion of Gestalt qualities, elaborating on a new theory of value, and developing new ideas in sexual ethics and cosmology. He drew on what he learned not only from Brentano, but also from Alexius Meinong, the Austrian economists, and evolution theorists. Nevertheless, Ehrenfels (as he shall henceforth be designated) was also critical of his various mentors on a number of...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Philosophy and the Precautionary Principle: Science, Evidence, and Environmental Policy

2015.05.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Daniel Steel,&#160;Philosophy and the Precautionary Principle: Science, Evidence, and Environmental Policy, Cambridge University
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2015.05.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Daniel Steel, Philosophy and the Precautionary Principle: Science, Evidence, and Environmental Policy, Cambridge University Press, 2015, 256pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107078161. Reviewed by Neil A. Manson, University of Mississippi Proponents of the Precautionary Principle (PP) herald it as an approach to making decisions about human health and the environment that differs radically from standard approaches such as cost-benefit analysis (CBA). PP is meant to provide guidance with respect to cases in which we have incomplete scientific knowledge of the harmful effects of either bringing to the market new technologies (e.g., genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or nanotechnology) or permitting continued use of old technologies (e.g., the burning of fossil fuels). The central idea is that even if the normal scientific standards for establishing causal connections are not met in the case of the relationship. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Christian Ethics and Commonsense Morality: An Intuitionist Account

2015.05.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kevin Jung,&#160;Christian Ethics and Commonsense Morality: An Intuitionist Account, Routledge, 2015, 202pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2015.05.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kevin Jung, Christian Ethics and Commonsense Morality: An Intuitionist Account, Routledge, 2015, 202pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138840676. Reviewed by Daniel Crow, University of Wisconsin-Madison It is easy to be misled by the title of Kevin Jung's new book. Jung does not discuss either Commonsense Morality or intuitionism until the antepenultimate chapter, and he does not focus on Christian Ethics until the final one. So what is the majority of this book actually about? I think the best way to describe it is as a defense of a coherent set of philosophical positions that are each highly regarded in the Analytic Philosophical Tradition (viz. foundationalism, moral realism, and intuitionism) addressed to philosophical concerns characteristic of the Continental Tradition. Jung articulates some of these concerns in the opening chapter, "Varieties of Postmodern Ethics." The common thread he discerns running. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The American protest against <em>Charlie Hebdo</em> isn't about American ignorance of French satire. No, it's about <strong>panic and fear</strong> in literary New York

The American protest against Charlie Hebdo isn&#39;t about American ignorance of French satire. No, it&#39;s about panic and fear in literary New
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The American protest against Charlie Hebdo isn't about American ignorance of French satire. No, it's about panic and fear in literary New York

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily