Genderalizations

Literary history is male-dominated. Literary journalism, too. But rest assured that editors are keenly aware of the problem…
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Literary history is male-dominated. Literary journalism, too. But rest assured that editors are keenly aware of the problem… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Afterlife

From Gilgamesh on, the afterlife has taken many guises. Our view is an incoherent projection of needs and impulses, irreconcilably at odds…
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From Gilgamesh on, the afterlife has taken many guises. Our view is an incoherent projection of needs and impulses, irreconcilably at odds… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of George Santayana

2015.02.39 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Morris Grossman, Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of George Santayana, Martin A. Coleman (ed.), Fordham University Press,
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2015.02.39 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Morris Grossman, Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of George Santayana, Martin A. Coleman (ed.), Fordham University Press, 2014, 315pp., $26.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780823257232. Reviewed by Matthew Caleb Flamm, Rockford University In a climate where print academic publications are increasingly financially unfeasible it is encouraging to see presses like Fordham University's backing a rich, eclectic collection like this one by Morris Grossman. Grossman died in 2012, and the book honors his scholarly career. As a brief preface by the editor Martin A. Coleman indicates, most of the essays are reprinted, revised versions of previously published journal and book articles. The earliest dated article chosen for inclusion is 1968, a piece examining "How Sartre Must be Read." Most of the remaining selections are dated as having appeared in the seventies and eighties, a few in the nineties, one in 2005 and two. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Against self-criticism

Self-criticism is integral to our sense of self. What does this unrelenting, unforgiving, internal nag want? Adam Philips hazards an answer…
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Self-criticism is integral to our sense of self. What does this unrelenting, unforgiving, internal nag want? Adam Philips hazards an answer… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Question about Education - Allen Stairs responds

Is Plato right when he says that ignorance is the source of all evil? I live in the American south, and a large number of the people here are, in my opinion, ignorant; and i recently got into an
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Is Plato right when he says that ignorance is the source of all evil? I live in the American south, and a large number of the people here are, in my opinion, ignorant; and i recently got into an argument with a class mate of mine who said that ignorance is bliss. At least half of the people at my school have his attitude, they don't care about their education and they prefer to not deal with things that might broaden their horizons. If ignorance is the source of evil, does that mean that my area is a hot spot for evil, or is my definition of evil wrong? Response from: Allen Stairs Let's start with a distinction. We may say that a situation is evil if it's sufficiently bad, whatever it was that brought the situation about—even if no one intended it. But we don't usually say that a person is evil unless they have evil intentions. Start with evil people. In the kind of case that comes most easily to mind, ignorance isn't the issue. Sadly, there are people who just don't care. If. . .

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Implicit Bias

[New Entry by Michael Brownstein on February 26, 2015.] "Implicit bias" is a term of art referring to relatively unconscious and relatively automatic features of prejudiced judgment and social
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[New Entry by Michael Brownstein on February 26, 2015.] "Implicit bias" is a term of art referring to relatively unconscious and relatively automatic features of prejudiced judgment and social behavior. While psychologists in the field of "implicit social cognition" study "implicit attitudes" toward consumer products, self-esteem, food, alcohol, political values, and more, the most striking and well-known research has focused on implicit attitudes toward members of socially stigmatized groups, such as African-Americans, women, and the LGBTQ community.[1] For...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Question about Philosophers - Eddy Nahmias responds

Dear Philosophers, Can someone recommend a biography of Baruch Spinoza? Thank you Response from: Eddy Nahmias I haven't read Rebecca Goldstein's biography of Spinoza, but she's a great writer
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Dear Philosophers, Can someone recommend a biography of Baruch Spinoza? Thank you Response from: Eddy Nahmias I haven't read Rebecca Goldstein's biography of Spinoza, but she's a great writer (with PhD in philosophy) and my dad liked it. I can't vouch for how thorough it is, but it will give you a sense of his philosophical views as well. http://www.amazon.com/Betraying-Spinoza-Renegade-Modernity-Encounters/dp/0805211594

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Postdoc Fellowships

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  Norwegian University of Life
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
Norwegian University of Life Sciences
Town: 
Aas
Country: 
Norway . . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Explaining the Reasons We Share: Explanation and Expression in Ethics, Volume 1

2015.02.38 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mark Schroeder, Explaining the Reasons We Share: Explanation and Expression in Ethics, Volume 1, Oxford University Press, 2014,
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2015.02.38 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mark Schroeder, Explaining the Reasons We Share: Explanation and Expression in Ethics, Volume 1, Oxford University Press, 2014, 249pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198713807. Reviewed by Jonas Olson, Stockholm University If you are reading this review you may well know that Mark Schroeder is an extraordinarily prolific writer. During the last decade, his work in metaethics and adjacent areas has been highly influential. This volume, the first of two, comprises eleven papers, one not published before, on interrelated topics like reasons, supervenience, and reduction. The papers are characteristically rich in ideas and detail. There is also an introductory chapter in which Schroeder gives a very helpful overview of his philosophical project, explaining how the individual papers hang together. The volume is divided into four parts. The motivation behind this division seemed unclear to me, and there are no thematic. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Nothingness and the Meaning of Life: Philosophical Approaches to Ultimate Meaning Through Nothing and Reflexivity

2015.02.37 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nicholas Waghorn, Nothingness and the Meaning of Life: Philosophical Approaches to Ultimate Meaning Through Nothing and
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2015.02.37 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nicholas Waghorn, Nothingness and the Meaning of Life: Philosophical Approaches to Ultimate Meaning Through Nothing and Reflexivity, Bloomsbury, 2014, 299pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781472531810. Reviewed by David Lee Stegall, Clemson University Nicholas Waghorn's book takes its inspiration from a familiar problem, which plagues any offered answer to the question "What is the meaning of life". Whatever one offers, be it an achievement, trait, crystalized idea, etc., can always be undermined by what Waghorn labels "the problem of reflexive iteration". Reflexive iteration is defined by him as "the capacity one has to draw limits to a certain thought or experience, and then proceed to project the possibility of continuance of that thought or experience beyond those limits" (p. 102). In short, if one says that the meaning of life is to serve the needs of others, one can always be faced with the reply of "so. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News