Philosopher of the month: al-Kindī

Known as the “first philosopher of the Arabs,” al-Kindī was one of the most important mathematicians, physicians, astronomers and philosophers of his time. He composed hundreds of treatises, using
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This October, the OUP Philosophy team honors al-Kindī (c. 800-870) as their Philosopher of the Month. Known as the “first philosopher of the Arabs,” al-Kindī was one of the most important mathematicians, physicians, astronomers and philosophers of his time. He composed hundreds of treatises, using many of the tools of Greek philosophy to address themes in Islamic thought. Abū Yūsuf Ya‘qūb b. Isḥāq al‐Kindī was born to a noble family of the Kinda tribe at the start of the ninth century, amid a period of abundant Islamic theological speculation, ḥadĪth scholarship, and the development of sophisticated Arabic literature. Al-Kindī’ was raised in Basra, an important cultural center for the study of Islamic theology and Arabic literature and grammar, and educated in Baghdad, where he likely met Syrian and Persian scholars who pursued the new learning of Greek sciences in the new capital. Having earned the support of the caliphs al-Ma’mun and al-Mu‘tasim, al-Kindī was appointed as the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

<strong>Poems are inefficient</strong> by design, like taking a long walk. That&rsquo;s why a society that celebrates efficiency, profit maximization, and productivity needs them

Poems are inefficient by design, like taking a long walk. That&amp;rsquo;s why a society that celebrates efficiency, profit maximization, and productivity needs
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Poems are inefficient by design, like taking a long walk. That’s why a society that celebrates efficiency, profit maximization, and productivity needs them

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Oedipal rebellion and the <strong>Frankfurt School</strong>. Were Adorno, Benjamin, et al. merely sons rebelling against &mdash; while depending on &mdash; their wealthy fathers?

Oedipal rebellion and the Frankfurt School. Were Adorno, Benjamin, et al. merely sons rebelling against &amp;mdash; while depending on &amp;mdash; their wealthy
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Oedipal rebellion and the Frankfurt School. Were Adorno, Benjamin, et al. merely sons rebelling against — while depending on — their wealthy fathers?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Paper trail. A recent glut of works examine the <strong>history of the book</strong>. Clearly we&rsquo;re anticipating nostalgia for the book format

Paper trail. A recent glut of works examine the history of the book. Clearly we&amp;rsquo;re anticipating nostalgia for the book
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Paper trail. A recent glut of works examine the history of the book. Clearly we’re anticipating nostalgia for the book format

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Wells Fargo & Financial Crimes

Embed from Getty Images The venerable Wells Fargo bank made the news in 2016 for financial misdeeds on a massive scale. Employees of the company, in an effort to meet the quotas set by management,
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Embed from Getty Images The venerable Wells Fargo bank made the news in 2016 for financial misdeeds on a massive scale. Employees of the company, in an effort to meet the quotas set by management, had created numerous accounts without the permission of the clients. In response over 5,300 lower level employees were fired. Initially, CEO John Stumpf and former head of retail banking Carrie Tolstedt were to keep their rather sizable compensation for leading the company to a great financial “success” based on this fraud. However, backlash from the public and the shareholders has resulted in Stumpf and Carrie losing some of their financial compensation. As would be expected, there are currently no plans for criminal charges of the sort that could result in jail time. This is consistent with how financial misdeeds by the elites are typically handled: some fines and, at worst, some forfeiture of ill-gotten gains. While I do not generally agree with Trump, he is not wrong when he points. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

The origin of the word “slang” is known!

Caution is a virtue, but, like every other virtue, it can be practiced with excessive zeal and become a vice (like parsimony turning into stinginess). The negative extreme of caution is
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Caution is a virtue, but, like every other virtue, it can be practiced with excessive zeal and become a vice (like parsimony turning into stinginess). The negative extreme of caution is cowardice. Although in dealing with historical linguistics, one should beware of jumping to conclusions, sometimes explorers succeed in revealing the truth, and then the time comes for accepting it. Slang, an overlay on standard language, has always existed, but the English word slang, as we know it, is recent: the earliest citations in the OED go back to the second half of the eighteenth century. That the very name of slang may emerge as a slang word need not surprise us (the origin of argot and cant provides a good parallel), and this makes its source even harder to discover, for slang tends to be born in places like Offal Court and disguise its shabby pedigree. Only a hundred years ago, slang was castigated as something unseemly and vulgar, but the war declared on it had as little chance of success. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

What's causing <strong>literary culture&rsquo;s decline</strong>? According to Cynthia Ozick, it&rsquo;s neither TV nor the internet but weak literary criticism. &ldquo;Without the critics, incoherence.&rdquo;

What&#39;s causing literary culture&amp;rsquo;s decline? According to Cynthia Ozick, it&amp;rsquo;s neither TV nor the internet but weak literary criticism. &amp;ldquo;Without the critics,
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What's causing literary culture’s decline? According to Cynthia Ozick, it’s neither TV nor the internet but weak literary criticism. “Without the critics, incoherence.”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The notion of <strong>time travel</strong> beguiled Bertrand Russell, Kurt G&ouml;del, and Stephen Hawking. Has any idea produced more convoluted and futile philosophical analysis?

The notion of time travel beguiled Bertrand Russell, Kurt G&amp;ouml;del, and Stephen Hawking. Has any idea produced more convoluted and futile philosophical
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The notion of time travel beguiled Bertrand Russell, Kurt Gödel, and Stephen Hawking. Has any idea produced more convoluted and futile philosophical analysis?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

What's causing <strong>iterary culture&rsquo;s decline</strong>? According to Cynthia Ozick, it&rsquo;s neither TV nor the internet but weak literary criticism. &ldquo;Without the critics, incoherence.&rdquo;

What&#39;s causing iterary culture&amp;rsquo;s decline? According to Cynthia Ozick, it&amp;rsquo;s neither TV nor the internet but weak literary criticism. &amp;ldquo;Without the critics,
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What's causing iterary culture’s decline? According to Cynthia Ozick, it’s neither TV nor the internet but weak literary criticism. “Without the critics, incoherence.”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Locke, Hume, and the Treacherous Logos of Atomism: The Eclipse of Democratic Values in the Early Modern Period

2016.09.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robert J. Roecklein, Locke, Hume, and the Treacherous Logos of Atomism: The Eclipse of Democratic Values in the Early Modern
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2016.09.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robert J. Roecklein, Locke, Hume, and the Treacherous Logos of Atomism: The Eclipse of Democratic Values in the Early Modern Period, Lexington, 2015, 247pp., $100.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781498509817.   Reviewed by Stefanie Rocknak, Hartwick College In this ambitious, far-reaching book, Robert Roecklein argues that the philosophical notion of "atomism" has had, and continues to have, a rather crippling effect on philosophy and politics. In particular, Roecklein claims, "atomism" is a metaphysical theory, that, generally speaking, maintains that the ultimate, smallest bits of the universe are not perceivable. Moreover, these bits constitute "indestructible and eternal 'being.'" (xiii) As a result, according to the atomist, "ordinary" experience, particularly, "ordinary" perception -- where we appear to apprehend objects, e.g. tables and chairs -- does not, in fact, access "being." Concomitantly, the "ordinary". . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News