What is <strong>humanity&rsquo;s greatest idea</strong>? It may be atomic theory &mdash; that all things are made of atoms. A tragedy, then, that the works of its originator, Democritus, were lost

What is humanity&amp;rsquo;s greatest idea? It may be atomic theory &amp;mdash; that all things are made of atoms. A tragedy, then, that the works of its originator, Democritus, were
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What is humanity’s greatest idea? It may be atomic theory — that all things are made of atoms. A tragedy, then, that the works of its originator, Democritus, were lost

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

For Victorians, their literature reflected the triumph of the British Empire. For African-Americans, <strong>Victorian literature</strong> was an unlikely source of inspiration

For Victorians, their literature reflected the triumph of the British Empire. For African-Americans, Victorian literature was an unlikely source of
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For Victorians, their literature reflected the triumph of the British Empire. For African-Americans, Victorian literature was an unlikely source of inspiration

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Freud&rsquo;s founding circle had 13 members. Only one was gentile. Almost all of their patients were Jewish as well. How to explain the <strong>Jewish predilection for psychoanalysis</strong>?

Freud&amp;rsquo;s founding circle had 13 members. Only one was gentile. Almost all of their patients were Jewish as well. How to explain the Jewish predilection for
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Freud’s founding circle had 13 members. Only one was gentile. Almost all of their patients were Jewish as well. How to explain the Jewish predilection for psychoanalysis?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Animalism: New Essays on Persons, Animals, and Identity

2017.01.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stephan Blatti and Paul F. Snowdon (eds.), Animalism: New Essays on Persons, Animals, and Identity, Oxford University Press,
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2017.01.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Stephan Blatti and Paul F. Snowdon (eds.), Animalism: New Essays on Persons, Animals, and Identity, Oxford University Press, 2016, 334pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199608751. Reviewed by Matt Duncan, Rhode Island College This book gives a great sense of the ongoing conversation about animalism, a conversation that has been around for a while. So the trenches are dug deep; no one is giving a whole lot of ground. Yet it's still a rich and interesting conversation about a question that concerns us all: what are we? This conversation is also somewhat messy. Not everyone is talking about the same thing. So it's no surprise that one of the editors' central questions is "what is animalism?" These days, the official animalist slogan is "we are animals". Seems straightforward. But it's not. The most common elaboration of this slogan is that we -- people like you and me -- are strictly identical to animals (human... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Teachers’ Unions II: Protecting Bad Teachers

Embed from Getty Images One stock conservative talking point is teachers’ unions are a primary cause of educational woes.&#160; If only unions could be eliminated or significantly changed, then education
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Embed from Getty Images One stock conservative talking point is teachers’ unions are a primary cause of educational woes.  If only unions could be eliminated or significantly changed, then education would improve significantly. Those defending unions argue that education would be worse without unions and some contend the effort to eliminate teachers’ unions is part of a plan to transform public education into a for profit-system to benefit a few well-connected elites. Since the debate is so politically charged, it is difficult to objectively address the issue of whether teachers’ unions harm education or not. However, I will endeavor to address the matter as objectively as possible and acknowledge that as an educator and union member I am biased. As such, my arguments should be reviewed with due caution. Now, to the matter at hand. One standard criticism of teachers’ unions is that they harm students by protecting bad teachers from being fired. If unions could be changed or. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

CFP: The Marc Sanders Prize in Metaphysics

In keeping with its mission of encouraging and recognizing excellence in philosophy, The Marc Sanders Foundation seeks to highlight the importance of support for the work of younger scholars. As
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In keeping with its mission of encouraging and recognizing excellence in philosophy, The Marc Sanders Foundation seeks to highlight the importance of support for the work of younger scholars. As part of this commitment, the Foundation has dedicated resources to an ongoing essay competition, designed to promote excellent research and writing in metaphysics on the [...]

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News source: The Prosblogion

"<strong>Philosophy makes nothing happen</strong>," says George Scialabba. "For better or worse, it leaves the world as it finds it -&mdash; sometimes a little bit less confused, but just as often a little more"

&quot;Philosophy makes nothing happen,&quot; says George Scialabba. &quot;For better or worse, it leaves the world as it finds it -&amp;mdash; sometimes a little bit less confused, but just as often a little
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"Philosophy makes nothing happen," says George Scialabba. "For better or worse, it leaves the world as it finds it -— sometimes a little bit less confused, but just as often a little more"

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Studies in Buddhist Philosophy

2017.01.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mark Siderits, Studies in Buddhist Philosophy, Jan Westerhoff (ed.), Oxford University Press, 2016, 313pp., $75.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.01.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Mark Siderits, Studies in Buddhist Philosophy, Jan Westerhoff (ed.), Oxford University Press, 2016, 313pp., $75.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198754862. Reviewed by Charles Goodman, Binghamton University This volume collects nineteen essays by Mark Siderits, a scholar many have come to see as the world's leading expert on Indian Buddhist thought and its relevance to contemporary philosophy. It is dense, sophisticated, and sometimes quite difficult; and it draws on a remarkable range of sources. As this book is in no way an introductory text, philosophers who are unfamiliar with South Asian intellectual traditions would be better advised to consult Jay Garfield's excellent Engaging Buddhism or Siderits' own Buddhism as Philosophy. But for those with an interest in Buddhist thought, the collection is of great value. Siderits takes us on an illuminating and informative tour of ancient debates that to many may have seemed. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Pankaj Mishra has taken on an enormous task: <strong>explaining the modern world</strong>. But in trying to write about everything, he ends up writing about nothing

Pankaj Mishra has taken on an enormous task: explaining the modern world. But in trying to write about everything, he ends up writing about
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Pankaj Mishra has taken on an enormous task: explaining the modern world. But in trying to write about everything, he ends up writing about nothing

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

&ldquo;I am ill &amp; cannot help. Forgive. So go ahead without me.&rdquo; With that, <strong>Samuel Beckett</strong>, committed to correspondence yet overwhelmed by his epistolary duties, signed off

&amp;ldquo;I am ill &amp;amp; cannot help. Forgive. So go ahead without me.&amp;rdquo; With that, Samuel Beckett, committed to correspondence yet overwhelmed by his epistolary duties, signed
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“I am ill & cannot help. Forgive. So go ahead without me.” With that, Samuel Beckett, committed to correspondence yet overwhelmed by his epistolary duties, signed off

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily