Introspection

[Revised entry by Eric Schwitzgebel on April 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Introspection, as the term is used in contemporary philosophy of mind, is a means of learning about
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[Revised entry by Eric Schwitzgebel on April 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Introspection, as the term is used in contemporary philosophy of mind, is a means of learning about one's own currently ongoing, or perhaps very recently past, mental states or processes. You can, of course, learn about your own mind in the same way you learn about others' minds - by reading psychology texts, by observing facial expressions (in a mirror), by examining readouts of brain activity, by...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Question about Feminism - Miriam Solomon responds

Does having a mistrust of self identified feminist institutions make you an anti-feminist? When I heard that the university of Colorado invited a group of feminists (I think that's a fair
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Does having a mistrust of self identified feminist institutions make you an anti-feminist? When I heard that the university of Colorado invited a group of feminists (I think that's a fair description) from the APA my first inclination was to doubt their report because in my observation biased and otherwise problematic thinking patterns are typical of feminist organizations. Response from: Miriam Solomon Your final statement expresses your views: "in my observation biased and otherwise problematic thinking patterns are typical of feminist organizations." You sound like someone who thinks that they are justified in being skeptical of the claims of feminists. Is that all you are asking?

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Question about Philosophers, Science - Miriam Solomon responds

I am relatively new to philosophy, as I am in an introductory philosophy class. My question is what made Francis Bacon's scientific method scientific since he was a lawyer or more into politics
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I am relatively new to philosophy, as I am in an introductory philosophy class. My question is what made Francis Bacon's scientific method scientific since he was a lawyer or more into politics being he was more a political person than a scientist? I guess what I am saying is why is Francis Bacon's scientific method considered more scientific than it was political? Thank you. Response from: Miriam Solomon Francis Bacon advocated the use of inductive reasoning in science. Inductive reasoning is going from particular observations to general conclusions. It is an empiricist method, and contrasts with the more rationalist methods of the time, such as the work of Descartes. Is there is a political dimension to the logic of inductive reasoning (or to its specific implementations)? You'd have to make that case; prima facie, going from specific observations to general claims is a logical/methodological rather than a political method.

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News source: AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

Auditory Perception

[Revised entry by Casey O'Callaghan on April 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement.html] Auditory perception raises a host of challenging philosophical questions. What do we
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[Revised entry by Casey O'Callaghan on April 24, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement.html] Auditory perception raises a host of challenging philosophical questions. What do we hear? What are the objects of hearing? What is the content and phenomenology of audition? Is hearing spatial? How does audition differ from vision and other sense modalities? How does the perception of sounds differ from that of colors and ordinary objects? This entry presents the main debates in this developing area...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Hudson on Skeptical Theism and Divine Deception

The forthcoming Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion is full of interesting stuff! So far, I specially recommend Bishop and Perszyk on alternative conceptions of God and Dougherty and Pruss on
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The forthcoming Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion is full of interesting stuff! So far, I specially recommend Bishop and Perszyk on alternative conceptions of God and Dougherty and Pruss on apparently unjustified evils as ‘anomalies’ (in the philosophy of science sense). I have not yet read the last four articles. Here, I want to…

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News source: The Prosblogion

Press Release: Philosophy and Music Festival

Announcing HowTheLightGetsIn, the world's largest philosophy festival, featuring thought-provoking debates, talks and courses to bring big thinking back into public life. Purchase early-bird tickets now!

How-the-light-gets-in

Philosophy Programme Announced

22ND MAY- 1ST JUNE

‘Back to Big Thinking’ The Guardian

520 events, 6 stages, 180 speakers, 150 bands, 10 days.

HowTheLightGetsIn, the world's largest philosophy festival, is back with thought-provoking debates, talks and courses to bring big thinking back into public life.

Our theme this year is Heresy, Truth and the Future and we’ve just announced our full programme featuring over 500 events across ten days. We'll be joined by the world's leading philosophers including Bernard-Henri Levy and Hubert Dreyfus together with figures from the worlds of science, politics, philosophy and culture to debate everything from the science of consciousness to nature of matter and discover which of today’s heresies will become the truths of tomorrow.

Highlights are set to include:

Secrets of the Mind (24th May)

We have no explanation of consciousness. Yet from the origins of life to the workings of the atom, science has provided answers when none were thought possible. Might we crack consciousness as well? Or is this a fantasy?

Joanna Kavenna seeks answers from three eminent scientists - physicist Roger Penrose, psychiatrist Iain McGilchrist and psychologist Nicholas Humphrey.

It's An Immaterial World (31st May)

We think we understand what the world is made of. Atoms and, we are now told, bosons quarks and leptons. Yet our theory of matter does not explain thought. Do we need a radically new model to explain how material things and immaterial thought are connected?

American metaphysician John Heil, Biologist and author of The Science Delusion Rupert Sheldrake, and Australian philosopher of mind Daniel Stoljar think about thinking.

Who's Afraid of the Truth: Bernard-Henri Lévy in conversation with Rana Mitter (24th May)

France's most public intellectual Bernard-Henri Lévy turns his sights on the hypocrisy and blindness of politicians and philosophers alike.

Known for fierce opposition to totalitarianism in all its forms, BHL personally persuaded Sarkozy to intervene in Libya and is a radical force in France's cultural life.

Ultimate Proof (31st May)

We think evidence decides the matter. Yet even suicide bombers think they have evidence to support their cause. Should we see independent evidence as an illusion? Would this lead to a chaotic world without foundations or constraint? Or open us to the richness of reality?

Laurie Taylor asks philosopher advisor Nancy Cartwright, Templeton Prize-winning cosmologist George Ellis and American anthropologist Daniel Everett to consider the evidence.

Notes to Editors:

Tackling the latest theories in everything from philosophy and art to science and politics - all set against a backdrop of live music and DJ sets from some of the UK’s most exciting talent – HowTheLightGetsIn is the world’s largest philosophy and music festival and runs from 22nd May – 1st June in Hay-on-Wye. Our full programme will be announced at the end of March. For more information see: www.howthelightgetsin.org

For media accreditation, images and interview requests, contact Bianca Brigitte Bonomi or Anna Southby at Bed PR.

E: bianca@bedpr.com / M: 07878194220

E: anna@bedpr.com

Novels and gay sex

How much gay sex should a novel have? If the writer happens to be gay and is at all ambitious, he will have a complicated answer. Caleb Crain explains…
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How much gay sex should a novel have? If the writer happens to be gay and is at all ambitious, he will have a complicated answer. Caleb Crain explains… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

On Hugh Trevor-Roper

Hugh Trevor-Roper’s trajectory – once eminent, then discredited – echoes the oldest of morality tales. Yet in death, his reputation has been revived…
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Hugh Trevor-Roper’s trajectory – once eminent, then discredited – echoes the oldest of morality tales. Yet in death, his reputation has been revived… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Curator Hitler

Hitler took aesthetic concerns seriously – all too seriously. But look closely: There are places where you might agree with him…
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Hitler took aesthetic concerns seriously – all too seriously. But look closely: There are places where you might agree with him… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Just Property: A History in the Latin West, Volume One: Wealth, Virtue, and the Law

2014.04.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Pierson, Just Property: A History in the Latin West, Volume One: Wealth, Virtue, and the Law, Oxford University
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2014.04.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Pierson, Just Property: A History in the Latin West, Volume One: Wealth, Virtue, and the Law, Oxford University Press, 2013, 287pp. $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199673285. Reviewed by William A. Edmundson, Georgia State University This is the first volume of a proposed two-volume work. It is an intellectual narrative that begins with Plato's Republic and concludes with Locke's Second Treatise of Government. The focus is private property in the intuitive sense of tangible things that one person (or persons) may exclude others from occupying, using, or possessing. Thus, intangible property and property in persons -- including self-ownership -- are outside the book's scope. But the book is not only about property and its incidents but also, as the subtitle indicates, about the unequal distribution of property among persons and the bearing of unequal material holdings on the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News