The "Double Jeopardy" Objection to QALYs

I've previously discussed Harris (1987)'s famous objection that the use of Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) in medical resource allocation is unjustly "discriminatory". Harris' second
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I've previously discussed Harris (1987)'s famous objection that the use of Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) in medical resource allocation is unjustly "discriminatory". Harris' second objection is that the use of QALYs gives rise to an unfair kind of “double jeopardy” (p.190):QALYs dictate that because an individual is unfortunate, because she has once become a victim of disaster, we are required to visit upon her a second and perhaps graver misfortune. The first disaster leaves her with a poor quality of life and QALYs then require that in virtue of this she be ruled out as a candidate for lifesaving treatment, or at best, that she be given little or no chance of benefiting from what little amelioration her condition admits of. Her first disaster leaves her with a poor quality of life and when she presents herself for help, along come QALYs and finish her off!Harris makes it sound as though the worse off people are, the less. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

PhD Fellowship in Philosophy of Art on Architectural Theory (KU Leuven)

Job List:  Europe Name of institution:  KU Leuven
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
KU Leuven
Town: 
Leuven
Country: 
Belgium
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Zhivago’ story

Coy letters, misleading testimony: Isaiah Berlin traded in secrets at the heart of the Zhivago affair. He would have had us believe otherwise…
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Coy letters, misleading testimony: Isaiah Berlin traded in secrets at the heart of the Zhivago affair. He would have had us believe otherwise… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Men, Mars; Women, Venus

We start our embryonic lives as females, so how different can the sexes really be? Very, says Lewis Wolpert. Not least in how we think, play, and write…
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We start our embryonic lives as females, so how different can the sexes really be? Very, says Lewis Wolpert. Not least in how we think, play, and write… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

End of Britishness

Would Scottish independence be the end of Britishness? “If it survives at all, it will become narrow, eccentric, strident and romantic,” says Ian Jack…
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Would Scottish independence be the end of Britishness? “If it survives at all, it will become narrow, eccentric, strident and romantic,” says Ian Jack… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Foucault and Power: The Influence of Political Engagement on Theories of Power

2014.09.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Marcelo Hoffman, Foucault and Power: The Influence of Political Engagement on Theories of Power, Bloomsbury, 2014, 221pp.,
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2014.09.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Marcelo Hoffman, Foucault and Power: The Influence of Political Engagement on Theories of Power, Bloomsbury, 2014, 221pp., $120.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781441180940. Reviewed by A. Janae Sholtz, Alvernia University Marcelo Hoffman offers a genetic account of Foucault's notion of power. Thus, the book is organized according to the chronological progression of Foucualt's philosophy. Hoffman maps the intersections of different concepts relating to and informing the progression of Foucault's views on power. This conceptual diagram is matched by the commensurate account of Foucault's political practices. The book contains five chapters, each of which extends the discussion of Foucault's struggle to clarify and enumerate the indices and modalities of power, a concluding chapter, and an appendix containing a never before translated report on prison conditions generated by Information Group on Prisons (GIP) and edited by. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Montreal Neuroethics Conference for Young Researchers

The Montreal Neuroethics Network (MNN) is pleased to announce the upcoming “Montreal Neuroethics Conference for Young Researchers” on April 17th, 2015. Keynote Lecture: “The neurobiology of
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The Montreal Neuroethics Network (MNN) is pleased to announce the upcoming “Montreal Neuroethics Conference for Young Researchers” on April 17th, 2015. Keynote Lecture:“The neurobiology of morality”by Dr. James Blair, National Institutes of Health, Unit on Affective Cognitive Neuroscience This one-day international conference is aimed at young researchers, trainees, and students from all fields interested in neuroethics. Attendees will have the opportunity to present their own work as well as attend panels hosted by leading researchers in the field. We will also be hosting an essay competition and winning papers will be candidates for fast-tracked publication in a special issue of the journal Neuroethics. A limited number of travel awards will be granted to successful applicants. Information regarding essay and abstract submission will be circulated soon. Should you wish to contact us, please send us a message at neuroethics@ircm.qc.ca.

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

Getting High for Higher Education

Two major problems faced by the United States are the war on drugs and the problems of higher education. I will make an immodest proposal intended to address both problems. In the case of higher
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English: A domestic US propaganda poster circa 2000. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Two major problems faced by the United States are the war on drugs and the problems of higher education. I will make an immodest proposal intended to address both problems. In the case of higher education, one major problem is that the cost of education is exceeding the resources of an ever-growing number of Americans. One reason for this is that the decisions of America’s political and economic elites damaged the economy and contributed to the unrelenting extermination of the middle class. Another reason is a changing view of higher education: it has been cast as a private (rather than public) good and is seen by many of the elites as a realm to exploited for profit. Because of this, funding to public schools has been reduced and funding has been diverted from public schools to costly and ineffective for-profit schools. Yet another reason is that public universities have an ever-expanding administrative. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

A Note to Authors and Readers

I wanted to post a few comments aimed at both authors and readers of the blog. For authors: When you post something, it is really helpful if you make sure that you select all of the categories that
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I wanted to post a few comments aimed at both authors and readers of the blog.  For authors: When you post something, it is really helpful if you make sure that you select all of the categories that are relevant to your post.  In the event that there isn't a salient category, you should be able to create one that it suitable.  If not, let me know and I will create the new category on your behalf. By tagging posts with all of the applicable categories, it makes it easier for readers to find posts about specific topics--which is a very helpful tool (especially for students who may use this blog as a resource). Because you know the content of your posts better than anyone, it's easier for you to select the categories than it is for me since I first have to read the post and then go back and select the categories.  Sometimes I remember to take the time to do this on the author's behalf, but it often slips my mind.For readers: I run very few ads on this blog (and several of the ads that I. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy

2014.09.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew R. Dasti and Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2014,
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2014.09.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Matthew R. Dasti and Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2014, 312pp., $35.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780199922758. Reviewed by Christopher Bartley, University of Liverpool This is a fine collection of learned essays replete with translations from primary sources, but a sense of frustration may be induced in the reader attracted by the book's title. Most of the contributors admit that the topics of free will, agency and selfhood as understood in the West today don't really have equivalents in the Indian traditions of thought and practice under consideration. Some people are lucky enough to have as much freedom as we really need, while others are victims of forms of psychological, social and political oppression. Free will became a problem in response to certain theories that threaten what Bernard Williams called a deep metaphysical notion of the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News