Eubulides and his paradoxes

Who was the greatest paradoxer in Ancient Western Philosophy? If one were to ask this question of a person who knows something of the history of logic and philosophy, they would probably say Zeno of
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Who was the greatest paradoxer in Ancient Western Philosophy? If one were to ask this question of a person who knows something of the history of logic and philosophy, they would probably say Zeno of Elea (c. 490-460 BCE). (If one were to ask the same question about Ancient Eastern Philosophy, the person might well say Hui Shi (c. 370-310 BCE). However, my story here is about the Western side of the Euphrates.) According to Plato in the Parmenides, Zeno wrote a book in defence of Parmenides, containing many paradoxical arguments. Sadly, most of these paradoxes have not survived, with one notable exception: the famous paradoxes of motion, reported to us by Aristotle. With arguments such as Achilles and the Tortoise, and the Arrow, Zeno argued that motion was impossible. Zeno’s arguments have been much discussed through the history of Western philosophy, and — arguably — were finally laid to rest thanks to developments in mathematics in the 19th Century. However, for my money, the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Mr. Electrico, a magician, shouted &ldquo;Live forever!&rdquo; and electrified 12-year-old <strong>Ray Bradbury</strong>. The sci-fi writer is gone, but his work will last

Mr. Electrico, a magician, shouted &amp;ldquo;Live forever!&amp;rdquo; and electrified 12-year-old Ray Bradbury. The sci-fi writer is gone, but his work will
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Mr. Electrico, a magician, shouted “Live forever!” and electrified 12-year-old Ray Bradbury. The sci-fi writer is gone, but his work will last

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Why do we act the way we do? Go into the weeds of <strong>human behavior </strong>and you'll arrive at a definitive conclusion: It's complicated

Why do we act the way we do? Go into the weeds of human behavior and you&#39;ll arrive at a definitive conclusion: It&#39;s
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Why do we act the way we do? Go into the weeds of human behavior and you'll arrive at a definitive conclusion: It's complicated

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Train stations were <strong>Tony Judt's cathedrals</strong>; timetables were his Bible. The two trains he cared about most took him to places where he could avoid history

Train stations were Tony Judt&#39;s cathedrals; timetables were his Bible. The two trains he cared about most took him to places where he could avoid
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Train stations were Tony Judt's cathedrals; timetables were his Bible. The two trains he cared about most took him to places where he could avoid history

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Latin American Philosophy: Metaphilosophical Foundations

[Revised entry by Susana Nuccetelli on August 17, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] A salient feature of Latin American philosophy is its early engagement in reflection about
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[Revised entry by Susana Nuccetelli on August 17, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] A salient feature of Latin American philosophy is its early engagement in reflection about its nature and significance - indeed, the very possibility of its existence. The result of this reflection has been substantial debates on issues that are of interest not only to Latin American philosophy, but to metaphilosophy in general. For they similarly arise for other less familiar philosophical traditions. This essay looks closely at those debates about Latin American philosophy. It is focused on the analysis of its main problems and the positions...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Intellectuals are unreliable students of <strong>populism</strong>, finding it too prone to ignorance and demagogy. Beware anyone who claims to speak for "the people," but listen

Intellectuals are unreliable students of populism, finding it too prone to ignorance and demagogy. Beware anyone who claims to speak for &quot;the people,&quot; but
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Intellectuals are unreliable students of populism, finding it too prone to ignorance and demagogy. Beware anyone who claims to speak for "the people," but listen

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Did <strong>Jane Austen </strong>weave clues into her novels of her secret, radical politics? No, but her wit and wisdom were radical in and of themselves

Did Jane Austen weave clues into her novels of her secret, radical politics? No, but her wit and wisdom were radical in and of
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Did Jane Austen weave clues into her novels of her secret, radical politics? No, but her wit and wisdom were radical in and of themselves

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>How writers write</strong>. For Kingsley Amis, it was simply about applying the seat of his pants to the seat of his chair

How writers write. For Kingsley Amis, it was simply about applying the seat of his pants to the seat of his
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How writers write. For Kingsley Amis, it was simply about applying the seat of his pants to the seat of his chair

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Unity of Science

[Revised entry by Jordi Cat on August 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The topic of unity in the sciences can be explored through the following questions: Is there one privileged,
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[Revised entry by Jordi Cat on August 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The topic of unity in the sciences can be explored through the following questions: Is there one privileged, most basic or fundamental concept or kind of thing, and if not, how are the different concepts or kinds of things in the universe related? Can the various natural sciences (e.g.,physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology) be unified into a single overarching theory, and can theories within a single science (e.g., general relativity and quantum theory in...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Trump’s White Nationalists, Again

On the face of it, condemning white supremacists and neo-Nazis is one of the politically easiest things to do. Trump, however, seems incapable of engaging in this simple task. Instead, he has
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On the face of it, condemning white supremacists and neo-Nazis is one of the politically easiest things to do. Trump, however, seems incapable of engaging in this simple task. Instead, he has continued to act in ways that lend support to the alt-right. After a delayed and reluctant condemnation of the alt-right, Trump returned to his lane by making two claims. The first is the claim that “there is blame on both sides.” The second is the claim that there are good people on both sides. On the face of it, both claims are false. That said, these claims will be given more consideration than they deserve. If one accepts a very broad concept of blame, then it would be possible to claim that there is blame on both sides. This could be done in the following way. The first step is asserting that a side is responsible if an event would not have taken place without its involvement. This is based, of course, on the notion that accountability is a matter of “but for.” In the case at hand, the. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy