IAI Debate: Secrets of the Mind

Many philosophers hold that the essence of consciousness is the first person experience of being a conscious being, a phenomenon irreducible to any third-person analysis. Others demur. On which side do you fall?

LOGO_iai-black_40x373222Can science explain consciousness? That's the topic of a debate hosted by The Institute of Arts and Ideas. The debate is not new of course but of all topics in philosophy, this one is one of the more susceptible to being better informed by advances in the hard sciences. Many philosophers hold that the essence of consciousness is the first person experience of being a conscious being, a phenomenon irreducible to any third-person analysis. Others demur. On which side do you fall? IAI describes their debate this way: We have no explanation of consciousness. Yet from the origins of life to the workings of the atom, science has provided answers when none were thought possible.  Might we be about to crack consciousness as well?  An impossible fantasy or an exciting adventure for mankind?

The Panel: Joanna Kavenna asks eminent physicist Roger Penrose, Master and His Emissary author Iain McGilchrist, and evolutionary psychologist Nicholas Humphrey to explain the all-seeing 'I'.

Check out the video below and visit their website to join the conversation!

The truth about evil

Politicians talk about evil as if it could be eradicated. But the only effective strategy begins with accepting that evil will never go away…
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Politicians talk about evil as if it could be eradicated. But the only effective strategy begins with accepting that evil will never go away… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Shakespeare and Montaigne

Working in different languages at nearly the same time, Shakespeare and Montaigne invented the stylistic means for reflecting on the human condition…
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Working in different languages at nearly the same time, Shakespeare and Montaigne invented the stylistic means for reflecting on the human condition… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Irving Howe, storyteller of ideas

“Utopianism,” said Irving Howe, “is a necessity of the moral imagination.” He remained as committed to socialism in the 1980s as he’d been in the ’30s, and to literature as much as
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“Utopianism,” said Irving Howe, “is a necessity of the moral imagination.” He remained as committed to socialism in the 1980s as he’d been in the ’30s, and to literature as much as politics… more»

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Authorities: Conflicts, Cooperation, and Transnational Legal Theory

2014.10.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nicole Roughan, Authorities: Conflicts, Cooperation, and Transnational Legal Theory, Oxford University Press, 2013, 288pp.,
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2014.10.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nicole Roughan, Authorities: Conflicts, Cooperation, and Transnational Legal Theory, Oxford University Press, 2013, 288pp., $110.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199671410. Reviewed by Patrick Taylor Smith, Stanford University Our world is increasingly populated by a diverse constellation of legal and political agents. This order, in part generated by the growth of international governance and globalization, is sometimes cooperative, sometimes conflict-ridden, and oftentimes both simultaneously. Despite this multiplicity, these legal and political actors still claim authority over their subjects. This book aims to show that a pluralistic system of legitimate political and legal authority is possible, desirable, and fairly common in our world. Those who come to it looking for a substantive account of legitimate authority or for principles of justice that might regulate global governance institutions will come away. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Paul-Henri Thiry (Baron) d'Holbach

[Revised entry by Michael LeBuffe on October 22, 2014. Changes to: Bibliography] Paul-Henri Thiry, Baron d'Holbach was a philosopher, translator, and prominent social figure of the French
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[Revised entry by Michael LeBuffe on October 22, 2014. Changes to: Bibliography] Paul-Henri Thiry, Baron d'Holbach was a philosopher, translator, and prominent social figure of the French Enlightenment. In his philosophical writings Holbach developed a deterministic and materialistic metaphysics which grounded his polemics against organized...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Assistant Professor, Philosophy

Job List:  Americas Name of institution:  Palomar College
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Job List: 
Americas
Name of institution: 
Palomar College
Town: 
San Marcos
Country: 
USA
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Dougherty Interviews Erik Wielenberg

Contributor Trent Dougherty interviews Erik Wielenberg as part of Baylor’s C.S. Lewis 50th Memorial Conference. You can find more videos from the event on Baylor’s ISR
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Contributor Trent Dougherty interviews Erik Wielenberg as part of Baylor’s C.S. Lewis 50th Memorial Conference. You can find more videos from the event on Baylor’s ISR Channel

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News source: The Prosblogion

Conceptual Art

[Revised entry by Elisabeth Schellekens on October 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The philosophy of art addresses a broad spectrum of theoretical issues arising from a wide variety
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[Revised entry by Elisabeth Schellekens on October 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The philosophy of art addresses a broad spectrum of theoretical issues arising from a wide variety of objects of attention. These range from Paleolithic cave painting to postmodern poetry, and from the problem of how music can convey emotion to that of the metaphysical status of...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Pyrrho

[Revised entry by Richard Bett on October 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Pyrrho was the starting-point for a philosophical movement known as Pyrrhonism that flourished several
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[Revised entry by Richard Bett on October 22, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Pyrrho was the starting-point for a philosophical movement known as Pyrrhonism that flourished several centuries after his own time. This later Pyrrhonism was one of the two major traditions of sceptical thought in the Greco-Roman world (the other being located in Plato's...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy