Medicaid Expansion & Hospital Closures

Philosophy News image
One aspect of Obamacare was the expansion of Medicaid in states that agreed to accept this expansion. Some states, such as my adopted state of Florida, declined the expansion. This provided researchers with an opportunity to study the effects of accepting or rejecting the expansion. One study, conducted by <a href=”https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/abs/10.1377/hlthaff.2017.0976″>researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus</a>, found that hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid were six times less likely to close than hospitals in states that declined the expansion. Hospitals in rural areas, which tend to rely more heavily on Medicaid and generally have less income relative to urban hospitals, were the hardest hit. These results are hardly surprising. Hospitals are required by the <a href=”https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EMTALA/”>1986 Emergency Medial Treatment and Labor Act</a>(EMTALA). . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Talking Philosophy

Supervenience

Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Brian McLaughlin and Karen Bennett on January 10, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A set of properties A supervenes upon another set B just in case no two things can differ with respect to A-properties without also differing with respect to their B-properties. In slogan form, "there cannot be an A-difference without a B-difference". As we shall see, this slogan can be cashed out in many different ways....

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Grounds of Moral Status

Philosophy News image
[Revised entry by Agnieszka Jaworska and Julie Tannenbaum on January 10, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] An entity has moral status if and only if it or its interests morally matter to some degree for the entity's own sake. For instance, an animal may be said to have moral status if its suffering is at least somewhat morally bad, on account of this animal itself and regardless of the consequences for other beings....

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy