2017 in review

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(Past annual reviews: 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, and 2004.)Off the blog... Mostly I've been occupied this year by the arrival of this little guy:Professionally, I was delighted to finally find a good home for my 'Willpower Satisficing' paper (in Noûs!).  'Why Care About Non-Natural Reasons?' was accepted by APQ.  And a couple of previously-accepted papers -- 'Knowing What Matters' and 'Rethinking the Asymmetry' -- appeared in print, while 'Fittingness Objections to Consequentialism' was officially approved for an OUP-edited volume.  Busy times!On the blog...Applied Ethics* A series of posts took a critical look at a healthcare fiasco unfolding in the UK which our family experienced first-hand: UK shuts down Independent Midwives, Medical Indemnity: Protection or Compensation?, and Assessing the NMC's Defense of its Independent Midwifery Ban.* Universalizing Tactical Voting rebuts the moral objection to. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

Are there true philosophical theories that we cannot believe?

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Few philosophical theories are so hard to believe that no philosopher has ever defended them. But at least one theory is. Suppose that you think lying is wrong. According to a view that is known as the error theory, you then take lying to have a certain feature: you ascribe the property of being wrong to lying. But the error theory also says that this property does not exist. This entails that lying is not wrong. You may therefore conclude that lying is permissible. But according to the error theory, you then ascribe the property of being permissible to lying. And the theory says that this property does not exist either. The error theory therefore entails that lying is neither wrong nor permissible. And it entails similar claims about anything else you could do. Some philosophers have defended an error theory about moral judgements. But no one has so far defended an error theory about all normative judgements: all thoughts about rightness, wrongness, goodness, badness, reasons for. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

A Philosopher’s Blog 2017 Available on Amazon

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A Philosopher’s Blog 2017, the complete 2017 essays from A Philosopher’s Blog, is available in Kindle and print on Amazon. This book contains essays from the 2017 postings of A Philosopher’s Blog. The adventure begins in a time of post truth and ends with online classes. The essays are short, but substantial—yet approachable enough to not require a degree in philosophy. Available worldwide. Kindle (US): https://www.amazon.com/dp/1976760860 Paperback (US): https://www.amazon.com/dp/1976760860 Kindle (UK): https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B078PTBS1T Paperback (UK): https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1976760860 [ does generic viagra work | generic viagra online | professional cialis | what is cialis | female viagra alternative | generic viagra usa | where to buy viagra | viagra overnight | viagra drug interaction | drug sample viagra | vigor 2000 | generic name for viagra | generic viagra ok | viagra online sales | viagra 50 mg | viagra success stories | cialis overnight | viagra. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Philosophy in 2017: a year in review [timeline]

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This year a lot has happened in the field of philosophy. As we come to the end of 2017, the OUP Philosophy team have had a look back at the past year and its highs and lows. We’ve compiled a selection of the key events, awards, anniversaries, and passings which went on to shape philosophy in 2017. From Alvin Plantinga receiving the Templeton Prize, to the death of Derek Parfit, take a look through our interactive timeline. Which key events would you add to our timeline of philosophy in 2017? Let us know in the comments. Featured image credit: Socrates statue by RaiPR. Public domain via Pixabay. The post Philosophy in 2017: a year in review [timeline] appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesPhilosophers of the year, 2017: Beauvoir, Nietzsche, & Socrates [quiz]New year, new you: 13 books for self-improvement in 2018Normative thought and the boundaries of language 

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Prophecies of paperless offices notwithstanding, business, ideas, and thought still get written down. Humans are, after all, material. You can’t blow your nose into an email

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Prophecies of paperless offices notwithstanding, business, ideas, and thought still get written down. Humans are, after all, material. You can’t blow your nose into an email

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Online Classes

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Embed from Getty Images My adopted state of Florida has mandated that public universities offer 40% of undergraduate classes online by 2025. Some Florida universities have already jumped on the online bandwagon, perhaps because they can impose an extra distance learning fee on top of the standard tuition cost. The state legislature recently capped the fee at $30, although some schools already offer lower tuition and fees for students enrolled only in online classes. Governor Scott has contended that online classes should cost less than in-person classes. Proponents of the fee contend that it is needed to fund the development of online classes. This situation raises two important questions. One is the question of whether there should be such an emphasis on online classes. The other is the question of whether a special fee should be charged for such classes. I’ll begin with the question of the fee. As noted above, the main justification for charging a distance learning fee for online. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy