Poor George Orwell. The bare-knuckled revolutionary has been reduced to a cuddly, bipartisan grandpa. <strong>Orwell&rsquo;s deradicalization</strong> has a long and shameless history

Poor George Orwell. The bare-knuckled revolutionary has been reduced to a cuddly, bipartisan grandpa. Orwell&amp;rsquo;s deradicalization has a long and shameless
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Poor George Orwell. The bare-knuckled revolutionary has been reduced to a cuddly, bipartisan grandpa. Orwell’s deradicalization has a long and shameless history

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The past should be studied only to expose its failings. Or so goes liberal logic. How <strong>disparaging the past</strong> become a mark of intellectual respectability

The past should be studied only to expose its failings. Or so goes liberal logic. How disparaging the past become a mark of intellectual
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The past should be studied only to expose its failings. Or so goes liberal logic. How disparaging the past become a mark of intellectual respectability

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn</strong> was a political writer. But to see life solely in political terms, he believed, is to misunderstand it. The meaning of life lies elsewhere

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was a political writer. But to see life solely in political terms, he believed, is to misunderstand it. The meaning of life lies
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Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was a political writer. But to see life solely in political terms, he believed, is to misunderstand it. The meaning of life lies elsewhere

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

The Age of Responsibility

2017.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Yascha Mounk, The Age of Responsibility, Harvard University Press, 2017, 280 pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674545465. Reviewed
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2017.10.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Yascha Mounk, The Age of Responsibility, Harvard University Press, 2017, 280 pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674545465. Reviewed by Scott Anderson, University of British Columbia This is an impressive, frequently charming, and partly successful attempt to illuminate the way a distinctive understanding of “personal responsibility” — one which might be described as “responsibility as accountability” — has taken on an increasingly large and problematic role in Western politics and political thought over the last 50 years or so. It seems aimed to appeal well beyond the philosophical community, with hopes of motivating a thoughtful and concerned readership to revamp the way our conception of “personal responsibility”[1 functions in political and social life. The book employs a fair amount of extant philosophical work to provoke a change in our public discourse and practices, while also performing some creative. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Many of <strong>Alexander Calder</strong>'s greatest works have their genesis in children&rsquo;s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for play<strong><br /></strong>

Many of Alexander Calder&#39;s greatest works have their genesis in children&amp;rsquo;s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for
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Many of Alexander Calder's greatest works have their genesis in children’s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for play

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Mathematics and Its Applications, A Transcendental-Idealist Perspective

2017.10.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jairo Jos&#233; da Silva, Mathematics and Its Applications, A Transcendental-Idealist Perspective, Springer, 2017, 275pp., $99.00
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2017.10.18 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jairo José da Silva, Mathematics and Its Applications, A Transcendental-Idealist Perspective, Springer, 2017, 275pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9783319630724. Reviewed by Mirja Hartimo, University of Jyväskylä, Finland Jairo José da Silva formulates a transcendental-idealist approach to mathematics. Appropriating (he is explicit about not engaging in any kind of exegesis) some central notions of Husserl's phenomenology, da Silva holds that mathematics is "intentionally posited" in the mathematical community, in communal work that has been carried out for centuries. "Intentional acts," such as intuiting or empty intending, put something with characteristic features and properties in front of the subject (28). If such positing is consistent, the intended object comes into existence (29). This allows viewing the existence of formal objects "on their own terms," as intentionally posited by the mathematicians. This. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

After a decade of hype, the <strong>digital humanities</strong> has merely confirmed what should have been obvious all along: More information is not more knowledge

After a decade of hype, the digital humanities has merely confirmed what should have been obvious all along: More information is not more
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After a decade of hype, the digital humanities has merely confirmed what should have been obvious all along: More information is not more knowledge

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Many of <strong>Alexander Calder</strong>'s greatest works have their genesis in children&rsquo;s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for play<strong>.</strong>

Many of Alexander Calder&#39;s greatest works have their genesis in children&amp;rsquo;s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for
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Many of Alexander Calder's greatest works have their genesis in children’s toys. He was an overgrown man-child with a deep affinity for play.

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

A philosophy of <strong>being at home</strong>. Consider your domestic surroundings along with Gaston Bachelard, and you will have &ldquo;unlocked a door to daydreaming&rdquo;

A philosophy of being at home. Consider your domestic surroundings along with Gaston Bachelard, and you will have &amp;ldquo;unlocked a door to
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A philosophy of being at home. Consider your domestic surroundings along with Gaston Bachelard, and you will have “unlocked a door to daydreaming”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Responsible Belief: A Theory in Ethics and Epistemology

2017.10.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rik Peels, Responsible Belief: A Theory in Ethics and Epistemology, Oxford University Press, 2017, 288 pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.10.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rik Peels, Responsible Belief: A Theory in Ethics and Epistemology, Oxford University Press, 2017, 288 pp., $78.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190608118. Reviewed by Gunnar Björnsson, Stockholm University Rik Peels provides a comprehensive, original account of intellectual duties, doxastic blameworthiness, and responsible belief. The discussions, relating to work in epistemology as well as moral responsibility, are clear and often provide useful entries into the literature. Though I disagree with some of the main conclusions, the arguments are carefully laid out and typically merit a good amount of thought, even where one remains unconvinced. After providing an overview of the contents, I will specifically suggest that Peels' theory fails to account for one important kind of doxastic obligation and doxastic blame. In Chapter 1, Peels defends his understanding of the phenomena that are central to his inquiry. In line. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News