Free Time

2017.05.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Julie L. Rose, Free Time, Princeton University Press, 2016, 169pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691163451. Reviewed by Eric
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2017.05.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Julie L. Rose, Free Time, Princeton University Press, 2016, 169pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691163451. Reviewed by Eric Rakowski, University of California at Berkeley Liberal egalitarian theories of distributive justice focus predominantly on what it means for a society to treat people as equals in allocating material resources and discrete opportunities, such as the chance to obtain an education, to secure employment, to buy insurance, and to participate in civic life. They tend to say nothing directly about the time people have available to pursue ends they choose. Julie L. Rose's book spotlights this omission. Her specific concern is free time, defined as "the time beyond that which it is objectively necessary for one to spend to meet one's own basic needs, or the basic needs of one's dependents, whether with necessary paid work, household labor, or personal care." (58) Rose argues forcefully that free. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

There will be cats. <strong>Murakami</strong> novels feature felines, detective heroes, and creepy sex. Readers are so hooked on the formula that the variations hardly matter

There will be cats. Murakami novels feature felines, detective heroes, and creepy sex. Readers are so hooked on the formula that the variations hardly
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There will be cats. Murakami novels feature felines, detective heroes, and creepy sex. Readers are so hooked on the formula that the variations hardly matter

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Margaret Wise Brown</strong> avoided witches, trolls, glass slippers, and sleeping beauties. Instead she revolutionized picture books, even prompting Gertrude Stein to write one

Margaret Wise Brown avoided witches, trolls, glass slippers, and sleeping beauties. Instead she revolutionized picture books, even prompting Gertrude Stein to write
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Margaret Wise Brown avoided witches, trolls, glass slippers, and sleeping beauties. Instead she revolutionized picture books, even prompting Gertrude Stein to write one

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Compositionality

[Revised entry by Zolt&#225;n Gendler Szab&#243; on May 24, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Anything that deserves to be called a language must contain meaningful expressions built up
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[Revised entry by Zoltán Gendler Szabó on May 24, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Anything that deserves to be called a language must contain meaningful expressions built up from other meaningful expressions. How are their complexity and meaning related? The traditional view is that the relationship is fairly tight: the meaning of a complex expression is fully determined by its structure and the meanings of its constituents - once we fix what the parts mean and how they are put together we have no more leeway regarding the meaning of the whole. This is the principle of compositionality, a fundamental...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

It used to be simple: dark suit, white shirt, discreet tie, black oxfords. Then came "<strong>casual Fridays</strong>" &mdash; and all we lost by dressing down

It used to be simple: dark suit, white shirt, discreet tie, black oxfords. Then came &quot;casual Fridays&quot; &amp;mdash; and all we lost by dressing
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It used to be simple: dark suit, white shirt, discreet tie, black oxfords. Then came "casual Fridays" — and all we lost by dressing down

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Sources of Knowledge: On the Concept of a Rational Capacity for Knowledge

2017.05.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Andrea Kern, Sources of Knowledge: On the Concept of a Rational Capacity for Knowledge, Daniel Smyth (tr.), Harvard University
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2017.05.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Andrea Kern, Sources of Knowledge: On the Concept of a Rational Capacity for Knowledge, Daniel Smyth (tr.), Harvard University Press, 2017, 295pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674416116. Reviewed by Allan Hazlett, University of New Mexico In this impressive book, Andrea Kern offers a response to philosophical skepticism and an account of the nature of knowledge. Her leading idea is that knowledge is an act of a "rational capacity for knowledge," the exercise of which provides the knower with "truth-guaranteeing grounds" for belief, such as your perceiving that there is a tree in the quad, which grounds your knowledge that there is a tree in the quad. Kern presents her argument as a series of Kantian insights, which makes the book an important one, representing an admirable effort to bring Kant's epistemology into dialogue with contemporary analytic epistemology, on which Descartes and Hume have (you might think). . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

2017 Sumer School: Global Bioethics, Human Rights & Public Policy

Conference Name: 2017 Sumer School: Global Bioethics, Human Rights &amp;amp; Public Policy Conference Date: June 19–30, 2017 Submission Deadline: June 15, 2017 Location: Pace University, College of
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Conference Name: 2017 Sumer School: Global Bioethics, Human Rights & Public Policy Conference Date: June 19–30, 2017 Submission Deadline: June 15, 2017 Location: Pace University, College of Health Professionals Website: Summer School Global Bioethics Flyer: Brochure

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David Hartley

[Revised entry by Richard Allen on May 23, 2017. Changes to: Bibliography] David Hartley (1705 - 57) is the author of Observations on Man, his Frame, his Duty, and his Expectations (1749) - a
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[Revised entry by Richard Allen on May 23, 2017. Changes to: Bibliography] David Hartley (1705 - 57) is the author of Observations on Man, his Frame, his Duty, and his Expectations (1749) - a wide-ranging synthesis of neurology, moral psychology, and spirituality (i.e., our "frame," "duty," and "expectations"). The Observations gained dedicated advocates in Britain, America, and Continental Europe, who appreciated it both for its science and its spirituality. As science,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Assistant Director

Job List:&amp;nbsp; Europe Name of institution:&amp;nbsp; APRA Foundation Berlin
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
APRA Foundation Berlin
Town: 
Berlin
Country: 
Germany
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

Africana Philosophy

[Revised entry by Lucius T. Outlaw Jr. on May 23, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] &quot;Africana philosophy&quot; is the name for an emergent and still developing field of ideas and idea-spaces,
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[Revised entry by Lucius T. Outlaw Jr. on May 23, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] "Africana philosophy" is the name for an emergent and still developing field of ideas and idea-spaces, intellectual endeavors, discourses, and discursive networks within and beyond academic philosophy that was recognized as such by national and international organizations of professional philosophers, including the American Philosophical Association, starting in the 1980s. Thus, the name does not refer to a particular philosophy, philosophical system,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy