For want of a comma

The Oxford Comma, so named because it first appeared in the 1905 Oxford University Press Style Guide, is the comma that comes before the word and in a series of three or more listed items. Also
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The Oxford Comma, so named because it first appeared in the 1905 Oxford University Press Style Guide, is the comma that comes before the word and in a series of three or more listed items. Also known as the serial comma, it’s the often ironic rallying cry of a certain type of language aficionado. And it’s in the news after a federal appeals court mentioned it in a court decision recently. The court case was O’Connor v. Oakhurst Dairy, a lawsuit filed by truck drivers seeking overtime pay that they had been denied under a Maine law. Maine labor law requires time-and-a-half for overtime, but makes some exceptions, specifically for workers involved in: The canning, processing, preserving, freezing, drying, marketing, storing, packing for shipment or distribution of: (1) Agricultural produce; (2) Meat and fish products; and (3) Perishable foods. “Oakhurst Dairy, Portland Maine” by John Phelan. CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons. Here is the question. Were the. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

What is social justice?

Notions of social justice generally embrace values such as the equal worth of all citizens, their equal right to meet their basic needs, the need to spread opportunity and life chances as widely as
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Using a social justice lens helps organizations to reframe issues generally viewed as individual in origin to include broader social, political, economic, and cultural understandings. In the following excerpt from the Encyclopedia of Social Work, Janet L. Finn and Maxine Jacobson explore the meanings and principles of social justice—a term which at times can be rather elusive and unclear in its applications. How do those individuals, whose work is centrally guided by the values of social justice, think about the concept? How does Western philosophy and political theory influence our understandings of social justice? The meanings of social justice are far reaching and ambiguous; translation into concrete practice is fraught with challenges. Social justice is a contextually bound and historically driven concept. Political theorists, philosophers, and social workers alike have explored what it means to be in the “right relationship” between and among persons, communities,. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

The difficulty of <strong>Cy Twombly&rsquo;s literariness</strong>. His work is about sentiment, not ideas -- and yet Romantic poetry and classical texts often populate his work

The difficulty of Cy Twombly&amp;rsquo;s literariness. His work is about sentiment, not ideas -- and yet Romantic poetry and classical texts often populate his
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The difficulty of Cy Twombly’s literariness. His work is about sentiment, not ideas -- and yet Romantic poetry and classical texts often populate his work

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

In the mid-1930s, when Nazi jurists and politicians looked for <strong>innovations in racism</strong> and a guide on how to discriminate, they looked to America

In the mid-1930s, when Nazi jurists and politicians looked for innovations in racism and a guide on how to discriminate, they looked to
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In the mid-1930s, when Nazi jurists and politicians looked for innovations in racism and a guide on how to discriminate, they looked to America

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Even Miltonists know that almost no one reads <strong><em>Paradise Lost</em></strong> anymore. But Wordsworth is still right: &ldquo;Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour&rdquo;

Even Miltonists know that almost no one reads Paradise Lost anymore. But Wordsworth is still right: &amp;ldquo;Milton! thou shouldst be living at this
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Even Miltonists know that almost no one reads Paradise Lost anymore. But Wordsworth is still right: “Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

On Sympathy: A Dream Dialogue

Robert R. Clewis dreams about
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Robert R. Clewis dreams about sympathy.

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News source: Philosophy Now

Hybrid Logic

[Revised entry by Torben Bra&#252;ner on March 24, 2017. Changes to: Main text] Hybrid logics are logics that result by adding further expressive power to ordinary modal logic. The most basic hybrid
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[Revised entry by Torben Braüner on March 24, 2017. Changes to: Main text] Hybrid logics are logics that result by adding further expressive power to ordinary modal logic. The most basic hybrid logic is obtained by adding so-called nominals which are propositional symbols of a new sort, each being true at exactly one possible world. The history of hybrid logic goes back to Arthur N. Prior's work in the 1960s....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Derek Parfit (1942-2017)

Jeff McMahan says farewell to a
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Jeff McMahan says farewell to a friend.

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News source: Philosophy Now