Are you a philosophical parent? [quiz]

Some people are both parents and philosophers, but aren’t philosophical parents. Conversely, some people aren’t philosophers, or at least aren’t academic philosophers, but are nevertheless
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Some people are both parents and philosophers, but aren’t philosophical parents. Conversely, some people aren’t philosophers, or at least aren’t academic philosophers, but are nevertheless philosophical parents. So who are the philosophical parents? Are you one? Take the quiz below and find out! (Pretend, for purposes of the quiz, that you’ve experienced every stage of parenthood and that you’ve had both a boy and a girl.) Now that you know whether you’re a philosophical parent or not, you might be wondering whether it’s good or bad if you are. It’s good, I think—both beneficial and enjoyable—so long as being philosophical doesn’t crowd out other beneficial and satisfying stances. I’ll leave it to others to construct quizzes that determine whether you’re a loving parent, a fun parent, a well-informed parent. It takes all these things and more to be a good parent and to make parenthood meaningful and satisfying. For more, read the illustrated discussion guide to The Philosophical. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

<strong>Thoreau</strong> was a critic of triviality, gossip, and distraction. He preferred communing with dead authors to chatting with his neighbors. What would he have made of Twitter?

Thoreau was a critic of triviality, gossip, and distraction. He preferred communing with dead authors to chatting with his neighbors. What would he have made of
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Thoreau was a critic of triviality, gossip, and distraction. He preferred communing with dead authors to chatting with his neighbors. What would he have made of Twitter?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Sartre</strong> compared human freedom to skiing, but he really meant surfing. The action of imposing our will on the world is like riding a wave

Sartre compared human freedom to skiing, but he really meant surfing. The action of imposing our will on the world is like riding a
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Sartre compared human freedom to skiing, but he really meant surfing. The action of imposing our will on the world is like riding a wave

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

<strong>Friedrich Hayek</strong>, an obscure young Viennese technocrat, was called &ldquo;Mr, Fluctooations&rdquo; behind his back. How did neoliberalism, his big idea, gain sway?

Friedrich Hayek, an obscure young Viennese technocrat, was called &amp;ldquo;Mr, Fluctooations&amp;rdquo; behind his back. How did neoliberalism, his big idea, gain
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Friedrich Hayek, an obscure young Viennese technocrat, was called “Mr, Fluctooations” behind his back. How did neoliberalism, his big idea, gain sway?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Inconsistent Mathematics

[Revised entry by Chris Mortensen on August 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Inconsistent mathematics is the study of the mathematical theories that result when classical
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[Revised entry by Chris Mortensen on August 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Inconsistent mathematics is the study of the mathematical theories that result when classical mathematical axioms are asserted within the framework of a (non-classical) logic which can tolerate the presence of a contradiction without turning every sentence into a theorem....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Reasons for Action: Internal vs. External

[Revised entry by Stephen Finlay and Mark Schroeder on August 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Often, when there is a reason for you to do something, it is the kind of thing to
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[Revised entry by Stephen Finlay and Mark Schroeder on August 18, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Often, when there is a reason for you to do something, it is the kind of thing to motivate you to do it. For example, if Max and Caroline are deciding whether to go to the Alcove for dinner, Caroline might mention as a reason in favor, the fact that the Alcove serves onion rings the size of doughnuts, and Max might mention as a reason against, the fact that it is so difficult to get parking there this time of day. It is some sign - perhaps not a perfect sign, but...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Eubulides and his paradoxes

Who was the greatest paradoxer in Ancient Western Philosophy? If one were to ask this question of a person who knows something of the history of logic and philosophy, they would probably say Zeno of
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Who was the greatest paradoxer in Ancient Western Philosophy? If one were to ask this question of a person who knows something of the history of logic and philosophy, they would probably say Zeno of Elea (c. 490-460 BCE). (If one were to ask the same question about Ancient Eastern Philosophy, the person might well say Hui Shi (c. 370-310 BCE). However, my story here is about the Western side of the Euphrates.) According to Plato in the Parmenides, Zeno wrote a book in defence of Parmenides, containing many paradoxical arguments. Sadly, most of these paradoxes have not survived, with one notable exception: the famous paradoxes of motion, reported to us by Aristotle. With arguments such as Achilles and the Tortoise, and the Arrow, Zeno argued that motion was impossible. Zeno’s arguments have been much discussed through the history of Western philosophy, and — arguably — were finally laid to rest thanks to developments in mathematics in the 19th Century. However, for my money, the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Mr. Electrico, a magician, shouted &ldquo;Live forever!&rdquo; and electrified 12-year-old <strong>Ray Bradbury</strong>. The sci-fi writer is gone, but his work will last

Mr. Electrico, a magician, shouted &amp;ldquo;Live forever!&amp;rdquo; and electrified 12-year-old Ray Bradbury. The sci-fi writer is gone, but his work will
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Mr. Electrico, a magician, shouted “Live forever!” and electrified 12-year-old Ray Bradbury. The sci-fi writer is gone, but his work will last

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Why do we act the way we do? Go into the weeds of <strong>human behavior </strong>and you'll arrive at a definitive conclusion: It's complicated

Why do we act the way we do? Go into the weeds of human behavior and you&#39;ll arrive at a definitive conclusion: It&#39;s
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Why do we act the way we do? Go into the weeds of human behavior and you'll arrive at a definitive conclusion: It's complicated

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Train stations were <strong>Tony Judt's cathedrals</strong>; timetables were his Bible. The two trains he cared about most took him to places where he could avoid history

Train stations were Tony Judt&#39;s cathedrals; timetables were his Bible. The two trains he cared about most took him to places where he could avoid
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Train stations were Tony Judt's cathedrals; timetables were his Bible. The two trains he cared about most took him to places where he could avoid history

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily