Gaming Newcomb’s Paradox I: Problem Solved

One of the many annoying decision theory puzzles is Newcomb’s Paradox. The paradox was created by William Newcomb of the University of California’s Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The dread
One of the many annoying decision theory puzzles is Newcomb’s Paradox. The paradox was created by William Newcomb of the University of California’s Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The dread [More]

IAI Video: The Limits of Logic

Logicians don't rule the world or get the most done. Could it be that a consistent world view is neither desirable nor achievable? If we abandon the straightjacket of rationality might this lead to a more powerful and exciting future, or is it a heresy that leads to madness?
Logicians don't rule the world or get the most done. Could it be that a consistent world view is neither desirable nor achievable? If we abandon the straightjacket of rationality might this lead to a more powerful and exciting future, or is it a heresy that leads to madness? [More]

Press Release: Philosophy and Music Festival

Announcing HowTheLightGetsIn, the world's largest philosophy festival, featuring thought-provoking debates, talks and courses to bring big thinking back into public life. Purchase early-bird tickets now!
Announcing HowTheLightGetsIn, the world's largest philosophy festival, featuring thought-provoking debates, talks and courses to bring big thinking back into public life. Purchase early-bird tickets now! [More]

IAI Interview: Logic and the Linguistic Turn

Michael Potter is Professor of Logic in the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge, and has been a Fellow of Fitzwilliam College since 1989. His forthcoming book, Wittgenstein 1916, will be a study of Wittgenstein's views on ethics and religion during the First World War, during the time he was writing his famous Tractatus. Our friends at IAI spoke to him about Wittgenstein, the linguistic turn and the importance of logic to the study of language. [More]

Education & Negativity Bias

In general, people suffer from a wide range of cognitive biases. One of these is known as negativity bias and it is manifested by the tendency people have to give more weight to the negative than to
In general, people suffer from a wide range of cognitive biases. One of these is known as negativity bias and it is manifested by the tendency people have to give more weight to the negative than to [More]

You Mad Bro? Philosophers Have No Answer

The world is experiencing a growing and disturbing trend of unsportsmanlike conduct by professional athletes. The philosophical community isn't outraged.
The world is experiencing a growing and disturbing trend of unsportsmanlike conduct by professional athletes. The philosophical community isn't outraged. [More]

The Daily Owl 10-25-2013

Provided we have the right type of rigor, we need randomness, mess, adventures, uncertainty, self-discovery, near-traumatic episodes--all these things that make life worth living--compared to the structured, ineffective life of an empty-suit CEO with a pre-set schedule and an alarm clock. (Taleb )
Provided we have the right type of rigor, we need randomness, mess, adventures, uncertainty, self-discovery, near-traumatic episodes--all these things that make life worth living--compared to the structured, ineffective life of an empty-suit CEO with a pre-set schedule and an alarm clock. (Taleb ) [More]

The Daily Owl 10-23-2013

We are generally the better persuaded by the reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others. (Pascal)
We are generally the better persuaded by the reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others. (Pascal) [More]

Beyond Logic: Why Do We Disagree?

A recent paper by Helen de Cruz talks about why two educated people who are exposed to the same evidence disagree on the conclusion of an argument. The reasons aren't all that simple.
A recent paper by Helen de Cruz talks about why two educated people who are exposed to the same evidence disagree on the conclusion of an argument. The reasons aren't all that simple. [More]

The Daily Owl 9-30-2013

"To conduct an argument in the traditional sense, it is essential that there be some common ground. Unless the participants agree on the premises, there is no point in trying to derive a conclusion."
"To conduct an argument in the traditional sense, it is essential that there be some common ground. Unless the participants agree on the premises, there is no point in trying to derive a conclusion." [More]