Routledge Philosophy Journal Updates

Routledge Philosophy is celebrating the 90th volume of Australasian Journal of Philosophy with a virtual special issue, which includes a selection of articles and Editorial by Stewart Candlish.
Routledge Philosophy is celebrating the 90th volume of Australasian Journal of Philosophy with a virtual special issue, which includes a selection of articles and Editorial by Stewart Candlish. [More]

Week in Review: June 11, 2012

Some stuff of fun and interest. What can you do with a philosophy degree? Krauss' dismissal of philosophy. Guy Harrison's new book. Lingerie on a virtual woman. A hierarchical list of disagreements. What is tolerance? Socrates, the dialectic, and the US Supreme Court.
Some stuff of fun and interest. What can you do with a philosophy degree? Krauss' dismissal of philosophy. Guy Harrison's new book. Lingerie on a virtual woman. A hierarchical list of disagreements. What is tolerance? Socrates, the dialectic, and the US Supreme Court. [More]

Evolution and Religious Belief

Does an evolutionary theory of religious belief undermine faith? This podcast explores that question.
Does an evolutionary theory of religious belief undermine faith? This podcast explores that question. [More]

March 19 2012: Week in Review

New and noteworthy philosophy from around the web. Global atheism, religious humans, faith as a delusion, slippery slopes, republicans and linguistics, evidence for bigfoot, moral monsters, JFK, existential psychology.
New and noteworthy philosophy from around the web. Global atheism, religious humans, faith as a delusion, slippery slopes, republicans and linguistics, evidence for bigfoot, moral monsters, JFK, existential psychology. [More]

The Moral Monster in All of Us

How do you help those in need? What is your responsibility? Peter Singer argues that the well-to-do should give a fair percentage of their income away and that failure to do so makes you a bad person. But things aren't always that simple.
How do you help those in need? What is your responsibility? Peter Singer argues that the well-to-do should give a fair percentage of their income away and that failure to do so makes you a bad person. But things aren't always that simple. [More]

Conspiracy Theory

Who killed JFK? Was it a conspiracy executed by top government officials or the lone act of a single man? Epistemology is an especially valuable discipline to utilize when examining conspiracy theories. Some may think it is an epistemic duty to dismiss conspiracy theories. However, if a cursory examination of the evidence suggests that a given theory is plausible, then intuition seems to dictate that we have an epistemic duty to examine the theory. [More]

Northwestern Epistemology Brownbags

For those epistemologists whose plans take you to Chicago on a Wednesday during the academic year, consider coming to present an epistemology paper of yours at our brownbag series.
For those epistemologists whose plans take you to Chicago on a Wednesday during the academic year, consider coming to present an epistemology paper of yours at our brownbag series. [More]

Becoming a Better Knower

Philosophers have been been trying to better understand how knowledge works for centuries. Progress has been slow and comes in fits and starts but it does come. Every so often new philosophical innovations shed light on intractable problems and things move forward. Dr. Jason Baehr is a philosopher who may be at the cusp of one of those innovations working in the field of virtue epistemology that attempts to focus on the role and attitudes of the knower in the knowledge game. [More]

United States in Denial?

Geoffrey Wheatcroft tackles what he sees as a national epistemic crisis in the United States in a recent article for the New York Times. People in the US suffer from the problem of “unknown knows”: facts citizens should know about but choose to reject.
Geoffrey Wheatcroft tackles what he sees as a national epistemic crisis in the United States in a recent article for the New York Times. People in the US suffer from the problem of “unknown knows”: facts citizens should know about but choose to reject. [More]

Epistemology at the APA Central Meeting

Reposted from Certain Doubts: Since there are wicked rumors out there that Chicago is not a place to visit in February, below the fold [N.B see link above for the schedule] I have collected the various epistemology-relevant goings-on at the 2012 APA Central Division meeting, which is taking place F... [More]