The Ties That Bind . . . are Tribal

When we're confronted with new ideas, we have a strong tendency to retreat to the beliefs we're comfortable with. This cognitive bias keeps us safe but also prevents us from seeing the errors in our own thinking and makes our world smaller than it should be. It's time to leave the cave of tribalism and embrace the unknown. It's risky and potentially painful but absolutely necessary. [More]

The Third Man Argument: Part 1

What is the difference between myself and the desk at which I sit? Neither are anything but a simple assembly of atoms, floating about a universe of others. Where do I cease, in wake of something else? The aim of this essay is to defend the Theory of the Forms, and argue against the Third Man Argument’s criticisms—to effectively defend Plato from both himself and those who took up arms provided by the arguments posed by the Parmenides. [More]

The Third Man Argument: Part 2

What is the difference between myself and the desk at which I sit? Neither are anything but a simple assembly of atoms, floating about a universe of others. Where do I cease, in wake of something else? The aim of this essay is to defend the Theory of the Forms, and argue against the Third Man Argument’s criticisms—to effectively defend Plato from both himself and those who took up arms provided by the arguments posed by the Parmenides. [More]

The Third Man Argument: Parts 3 & 4

What is the difference between myself and the desk at which I sit? Neither are anything but a simple assembly of atoms, floating about a universe of others. Where do I cease, in wake of something else? The aim of this essay is to defend the Theory of the Forms, and argue against the Third Man Argument’s criticisms—to effectively defend Plato from both himself and those who took up arms provided by the arguments posed by the Parmenides. [More]